Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · The last daze of summer
. . . .

The last daze of summer

Robert Downes - August 31st, 2009
Random Thoughts
The Last Daze of Summer
Robert Downes 8/31/09

Remember the “Year Without A Summer”? Neither do I, because it happened in 1816. It was also called the “Year Eighteen Hundred and Froze to Death.”
Crops failed throughout the U.S. and Europe -- killed off by frost and two huge snowstorms in June. Ice was reported on the lakes and rivers of Pennsylvania in July and August, and (if Wikipedia can be believed) there were temperature swings from as high as 95 degrees to near-freezing within the space of a few hours.
It was caused by the eruption of the Indonesian volcano Tambora in 1815. The biggest earth burp in 1,600 years filled the sky with ash that dampened the sun.
Then there’s our summer, which most agree was a dud, weather-wise.
The National Weather Service (NWS) notes in its monthly Climatological Report that it was abnormally cool across Michigan this summer. In July, when the Detroit area usually gets half of its 90-degree temperatures, the thermometer never got above 86.
“Only four times in Detroit’s climate record history have we failed to reach 87 in July and that was in 1875, 1907, 1992 and now 2009,” the report states. “Our July average of 68.9 degrees was more like the tip of northern lower Michigan than the metro Detroit area.”
Mid-state, temperatures were about 6.5 degrees below normal on the average, according to the NWS. You can extrapolate from those temps what this has meant for our shivery summer in Northern Michigan. For frustrated beach-goers, it seemed like it rained 10 weekends out of 12 this summer.
About the best you can say for this summer’s weather is that it was good for business. Unable to hit the beach, tourists turned out en masse at downtown stores and restaurants and soothed their sense of deprivation by reaching into their wallets.
But at this rate, the Ice Age cometh next June...
Other pet peeves & ruminations this summer:

• The “handling charge”: Everyone hates this trend: You buy tickets to an event at nose-bleed prices and are then told there’s a “handling charge” of a couple extra bucks. For what, no one seems to know. It‘s not like you‘re getting a back rub or something.
We attended the Cherry Festival Wine event this summer, paying $10 for half a glass of Riesling and a “handling charge” of an extra dollar. It was more of an insult than an injury, but it will be hard to “handle“ going back again next year.
• Locked in ‘79: Was there a single major act that played Northern Michigan this summer outside of Kid Rock or Big & Rich that didn’t have one foot 30 years in the past? A pity you had to go to Rothbury or Detroit to see something current, like usual.

• TC’s snooty factor: It‘s a tale of two cities: again this summer we got an earful of gush about what a well-heeled, high-toned crowd in attendance at the Film Festival;; meanwhile disparaging the “low-class“ people at the Cherry Festival, who have the gall to eat down at the Open Space food court instead of at our gourmet restaurants. (Please note, I‘m paraphrasing here...)
Then there‘s the claim by some downtown merchants that Cherry Festival-goers don‘t buy much beyond ice cream cones, resulting in “the worst week of the summer.“
I wonder if this isn‘t an urban legend that‘s caught on over the years, since I‘ve talked to several downtown restaurateurs and retailers who do great business during the Cherry Festival, although admittedly, they are not high-end operations.
“Snooty” is Northern Michigan’s new “ugly,” and you don’t have to go far to find it in upscale communities around the region, even in a recession. But it‘s hard to imagine that the elitists taking shots at the hoi polloi didn‘t come from working class roots themselves. Or at least their parents did. Let‘s play nice next year.

• The Mayonnaise Rule: Does this ever happen to you?
You tell your glaze-eyed waitperson that you don’t want any mayonnaise on your sandwich.
You (lying): “I’m deathly allergic to mayonnaise; it’s like a mix of anthrax and bird poop with a serious spider phobia thrown in.”
Waitperson: “Right, no mayonnaise.”
You (as the waitperson is walking away): “Oh, and did I mention no mayonnaise? Can’t remember if I said that...”
Waitperson: “Oh yeah, got it.”
You: “You sure you don’t want to write that down? It’s a lot to remember.”
Waitperson, looking irritated: “I got it. No mayonnaise!”
You: “Yeah, good, no mayonnaise. Thanks.”
Sandwich arrives... with mayonnaise.

Back in Biz: The credit crunch and banking crisis put many high-profile developments in the ditch over the past year or so: hotel schemes, condos and new retail developments in Petoskey, Suttons Bay and Traverse City were shelved for lack of capital.
Few were sorry to hear of a proposed 130-room hotel being put on hold in TC‘s Warehouse District, which is percolating with creative energy with the InsideOut Gallery, Right Brain Brewery, and the Cuppa‘ Joe Warehouse restaurant. Many believe a hotel on West Bayshore would ruin the Warehouse District, which might be better developed as something similar to Detroit‘s Greektown.
But now that the Obama Administration is declaring the credit crisis to be over, one can only wonder how many of these developments are shovel-ready once financing becomes available. At the Grand Traverse Commons in TC, for instance, a new luxury hotel is moving forward, along with a possible new brewpub. Northern Michigan is on the verge of a new spurt of growth.

Hostel Takeover? Various (bad) schemes have been tossed around for the renovation of the 61-room Whiting Hotel in downtown TC, including as a luxury “boutique” hotel, or for low-income housing. None have gained much traction so far, even though there is apparently funding available from the State for the makeover of the 115-year-old hotel.
So why not a hostel? A low-cost place that would welcome everyone from backpacking young adults to families on a budget, with wi-fi, a communal kitchen and bikes for loan in the heart of a vibrant city. Hostels welcome visitors in almost every city in the world at rates from $10-$50, yet they are lacking in Northern Michigan. At the very least, we need hostels in TC and Petoskey.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close