Letters

Letters 02-01-2016

Real Contamination In 1968, Chicago (its Mayor Richard Daley in particular) felt menaced by anti-war protesters (Abbie Hoffman in particular) threatening to put the hallucinogenic LSD into Chicago’s water supply. In reaction to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., we reacted vigorously to a perceived threat of chemical or biological terrorist attacks on our water supply. A religious cult contaminating a city water tank with salmonella in Oregon, sickening about 700, was the only such attack in our country until now. The water supply of Flint, Mich., was attacked and contaminated, not by terrorists or protesters, but by our own government...

Why The Muslim Debate? I was passing through your fine town last week and picked up a couple copies of Northern Express. There I noted a discourse concerning the Muslim situation in Dearborn. It is interesting to note that I see similar conversations in newspapers and blogs throughout the country and, in fact, throughout the world...

Kachadurian Has It All Wrong Thank you for continuing to publish Thomas Kachadurian’s bigoted editorials. If not for this publication, I wouldn’t know that such people lived in my sweet northern Michigan...

Over The Line I felt Sarah Palin crossed the line when she indicated our president did not care about those like her son who came home wounded. No one challenges her on these remarks; to me it is shameful...

Flints’ Man-made Disaster Governor Snyder’s Financial Emergency Manager Law has created a State of Emergency in Flint. In 2011, newly elected Governor Snyder signed Public Act 4, giving him the freedom to take over any city government his office found financially bankrupt, with power to override any decision of elected city officials. This law showed his primary motive — money before people. In November 2012, the People of Michigan voted down his Financial Emergency Manager Law, as they resented losing control of their cities. In December 2012, he showed his contempt for the people’s vote and signed a revised version, one that did not give power back to the people...

Defending the AR15 And Gun Rights I was amazed to read David Downer’s recent letter. He admits he is a gun owner but he expresses his ignorance of what an “assault rifle” really is, and thereby spreads the antigun position that an AR15 is an assault rifle...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Hockey through the ages
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Hockey through the ages

Glen Young - October 5th, 2009
Hockey through the ages
NHL Star Craig Coxe passes on his skills in Petoskey
By Glen Young 10/5/09




School has been in session long enough again now that some students are starting to feel restless. That first holiday break cannot come early enough.

For another group back in their icy classroom, however, class is anything but a bore.

For the fifth year running, former National Hockey League standout Craig Coxe is conducting a skills clinic for adult players at Petoskey’s Griffin Arena.

Coxe, drafted in 1982 by the Detroit Red Wings at the tender age of 18, spent nearly two decades playing professionally and now those who attend his clinics can take advantage of that store of hockey knowledge.

Every Thursday and Sunday for six weeks from mid-September through late October, the group of 20 or so adults skates with Coxe, running through timing drills, shooting practice, and stick handling maneuvers.

Jerry Timm, a third year player, sees improvement in his play as result. “I’ve never been coached before. The timing drills finally make sense now,” he says.



ADULT LEAGUE

For most, this is a run-up to the regular season in the Char Em Adult Hockey League. For all it is a chance to rub elbows with a guy who will always be the first-ever goal scorer in franchise history for the San Jose Sharks.

Tom Cooper, a 45-year-old Harbor Springs resident who has played in the adult league three years and attended the camp last year as well, says he appreciates that Coxe does not play favorites. “He spends just as much time with the new guys as the with the guys who are experienced.” Cooper says Coxe’s coaching style is extremely helpful for new skaters. “He tells you, then he shows you.”

For Great Lakes freighter sailor Andy McGinn of Onaway, getting to the clinic involves a lengthy drive. McGinn, who used to play closer to home in Cheboygan, says the new commute is worth it. “For a new skater, this clinic is phenomenal.” McGinn believes the coaching will make him more ready when league play begins in late October.

Indian River auto shop owner Dan Nivelt, who has attended all five pre-season sessions, says the clinic helps him get ready for the regular season. And while Coxe is fond of saying he can’t improve skating for adults like he can for juniors, Nivelt is sure his skating prowess has improved as a result of time spent on the ice at the clinics.


SET IN THEIR WAYS
Coxe, a California native who saw ice time in the NHL with Calgary, Vancouver and St. Louis as well as San Jose, welcomes the opportunity to work with adults. “Sometimes it’s tough to teach adults because they’re set in their ways,” he says. “But they play because they enjoy the game. They become almost child-like.”

He plays off that enthusiasm in his instruction. Whether joking that, “we’re not chopping wood here,” while demonstrating a stick handling technique, or quipping, “It looks easy on paper,” while drawing up a break out drill, Coach Coxe infuses ample amounts of laughter and humor into his instruction.

Jim Murray, a 48-year-old Petoskey lawyer who has attended all five pre season clinics, appreciates this low-key approach. “Coxe is one of the nicest and most sincere guys you will ever meet. He has an amazing ability to improve all levels of hockey players and also make them feel good about their game,” he says.

Coxe came to Northern Michigan to coach the Northern Michigan Predators, a now-defunct minor league team. He was coaching in Texas at the time, in the Central Hockey League. When the team and the league folded, Coxe moved down the road to Griffin Arena, where he is now Director of Hockey. His duties include everything from driving the zamboni to scheduling locker rooms.


DOWN-TO-EARTH
What he enjoys most is working with players, whatever the age. “I’m fortunate to be able to give back something I love,” he says of his coaching. Coxe believes the only drawback coaching brings is the limited time he has to work with players. “There’s no frustration, really, because they want to learn.”

Another player who values Coxe’s relaxed style is 35-year-old Petoskey engineer Dario Primo, who says the clinic is “a gem.” “Craig is very approachable, down to earth, and funny,” he says. “Where else can you go in Northern Michigan and be taught by a former NHL player?”

Barb Greene, one of Griffin Arena’s owners, sums up the sentiment of players of all ages. “We just love Craig,” she says.



Craig Coxe runs clinics for adults, as well as youth players of all ages throughout the fall. For more information about the clinics, or for details about other Griffin Arena skating programs, contact Coxe at 231-487-1843, or visit griffinarena.net





 
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