Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · SOAPBOX COALITION Empowers...
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SOAPBOX COALITION Empowers Northern Michigan‘s Young People

Andy Taylor - August 26th, 2004
Few people can forget what happened in the election of 2000. Even though it has been said time and again, only after an election that was too close to call did everyone realize how important each vote was.
What was most shameful was the fact that the future leaders of this country, in the 18-30 years old category, did not show up to the polls. Less than half of the 50 million U.S. citizens in this younger age range cast their vote in November of 2000.
This November we have an election that could be just as close as that of 2000. With the help of groups like the Soapbox Coalition, the goal is to make sure that many of those 18-30-year-olds who did not vote in the last election, make it out to the polls this November.
“Soapbox’s goal is to educate, motivate and mobilize 18-to-30-year-olds in the political process and just get them involved. We want to show them different avenues to get involved in politics,” says Scott O’Leary, regional ambassador for the coalition.

NON-PARTISAN
In a time when so many groups and committees who claim to be non-partisan are anything but, it seems as though Soapbox genuinely holds to that credo. According to O’Leary, the local chapter is made up of an equal number of Democrats and Republicans.
He adds that the organizing members have even had some pretty heated debates.
“I don’t really like to talk about (my personal views) because I don’t want people to think that it might overshadow the purpose of our organization. I could tell you that mine are even different from all our members and our president and our executive director. We all have very different views but under the banner of soapbox we try to put all that aside and increase issue awareness and voter turnout,” O’Leary says.
Because of this outlook, Soapbox never takes a stance on an issue. Instead the group points out certain issues and says that they must be addressed instead of telling its members how to address the situation.
“Most young adults do not want to promote the agendas of others,” Mitchell says. “They want help transitioning into young voters -- without being told how to vote.”
The organization was started in January of 2004 by Mike Mitchell who began his career interning in the office of U.S. Sen. Paul D. Coverdell (R-GA). Mitchell found that, even though he was working in Washington, he was not being heard. “Even working in the Capital, I was getting ignored,” he says. “Other politicians would not pay attention to issues important to me until I told them I worked for Senator Coverdell.”

BRANCHING OUT
With the goal of starting a nonpartisan, political action group Mitchell spent five years prior to 2004 planning and raising funds until the group got off the ground. So far, people seem pleased with the results.
“Usually we have found that once we get people at our events, they are pretty enthusiastic. Once they come once, many of them come pretty much every event,” O’Leary says.
Currently, there are around 70 active members involved with the Traverse City chapter.
Soapbox sponsors a couple of events in the area and has plans to branch out gradually in the future. “We’re very happy to (have co-sponsored) the event at the Loading Dock with a voter registration and awareness concert as well as the following Sunday as well,” O’Leary adds.
There are also regular meetings where members can debate and discuss a multitude of issues. “We do have a weekly happy hour which we host for our active and new members. We’re actually inbetween locations right now and we’ll be letting our members know and passing out flyers as soon as we do set that up. Probably in a week or two and we usually do that on a Tuesday from about 5 or 6 until 8 p.m.,” he says.

CANDIDATE DEBATES
With awareness being one of the main goals, the organization is sponsoring debates between local candidates with the hope that young voters will have a better knowledge of the candidates running in local elections.O’Leary says general information forums are also an emphasis.
“We are in the basic planning stages of hosting a candidate debate between Barbra Budros and John Foresman who are both running for judge here locally.
We’re looking to do that with other candidates as well if they’re interested -- hosting debates or with what we did at the Dennos Museum when we had an open forum. What we did there was we had the Republican, the Democratic and the Green Party county chairs come in and it wasn’t a debate -- it was more giving them each 15 minutes to explain what their positions were, how they personally got involved in politics, that kind of thing. After that we had a question and answer session. It actually went fairly well. We had a decent turnout.”
As the election approaches, surprisingly enough, voter registration is not seen as the biggest emphasis at this point in the year for Soapbox, according to O’Leary.
“Locally, voter registration is fairly high. I’ve heard as high as in the ninety percentiles. Where I live in East Bay Township it’s right around 84 percent because of the Motor Voter law that was enacted with the driver license renewal being on the same form as voter registration,” he says.

PROBLEM REGISTERING
But there is a problem with registration that has nothing to do with getting unregistered voters to register.
“Even (those numbers) are kind of misleading because I went in knowing that I had registered to vote before, but I used the online checking program to see how accurate it was and they had no record of me being registered. I went in to the township clerk and they only had my family -- so there must have been an error in my form which actually happens a lot because I’ve been talking to other people locally and they had the exact same thing happen. So even though 85% might be high, that could even be misleading because people think they’re registered but they’re not.”
Essentially, the statistics regarding the number of registered voters should be even higher.
So, O’Leary says, it’s never a bad idea to check with your township clerk to make sure you are on the list.
“A lot of people think they’re registered but even if there is one small mistake, it throws out your ballot. So it’s always good to do the double check and make sure you have your voting card with you.”

 
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