Letters

Letters 08-03-2015

Real Brownfields Deserve Dollars I read with interest the story on Brownfield development dollars in the July 20 issue. I applaud Dan Lathrop and other county commissioners who voted “No” on the Randolph Street project...

Hopping Mad Carlin Smith is hopping mad (“Will You Get Mad With Me?” 7-20-15). Somebody filed a fraudulent return using his identity, and he’s not alone. The AP estimates the government “pays more than $5 billion annually in fraudulent tax refunds.” Well, many of us have been hopping mad for years. This is because the number one tool Congress has used to fix this problem has been to cut the IRS budget –by $1.2 billion in the last 5 years...

Just Grumbling, No Solutions Mark Pontoni’s grumblings [recent Northern Express column] tell us much about him and virtually nothing about those he chooses to denigrate. We do learn that Pontoni may be the perfect political candidate. He’s arrogant, opinionated and obviously dimwitted...

A Racist Symbol I have to respond to Gordon Lee Dean’s letter claiming that the confederate battle flag is just a symbol of southern heritage and should not be banned from state displays. The heritage it represents was the treasonous effort to continue slavery by seceding from a democratic nation unwilling to maintain such a consummate evil...

Not So Thanks I would like to thank the individual who ran into and knocked over my Triumph motorcycle while it was parked at Lowe’s in TC on Friday the 24th. The $3,000 worth of damage was greatly appreciated. The big dent in the gas tank under the completely destroyed chrome badge was an especially nice touch...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Indoor farm market
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Indoor farm market

Erin Cowell - February 1st, 2010
Indoor Farm Market
Winter can’t stop shopping scene at the Mercato
By Erin Crowell
Brick and stone shelter local shoppers from frigid temps at Building
50 of the Grand Traverse Commons. Nestled in the hills on the west
side of town, the old state asylum turned trendy condo/retail site is
now home to an indoor farmers market, happening every Saturday from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. in The Village, a community of shops and restaurants
located on the garden level -- or Mercato -- of the building.
The farmers market is no longer just a summer destination. With so
much focus on buying local, it’s only a matter of accommodation –
hosting vendors year-round in an accessible location, sans weather
conditions.
“The Village is reminiscent of an old-world marketplace where people
engage in meaningful human interactions – a community gathering
place,” says Mini Minervini, marketing director at the Commons.
The winter indoor market is simply an answer to what happens to The
Village’s outdoor summer market once the weather turns south.
You’ll find the same quality goods at this indoor market, along with
all the Village shops of the Commons, including Boutique A La Vie,
Premier Floral, Silver Fox Jewelry, Creation Farm, Gallery 50 and many
more.

THE LOCAL MARKET
“It’s awesome,” says vendor Katie Kearney of Naturally Nutty in
Traverse City. “There needs to be more of this. It keeps the local
market going.”
Naturally Nutty specializes in all types of nut and seed butters
including their butter toffee peanut butter, white chocolate cherry
almond butter, mocha peanut butter and organic sunflower and pumpkin
seed butters, among others.
Kearney is one of several vendors at the Village Farmers Market. It’s
only the inaugural year, but this season has turned out big crowds and
profitable sales.
“The initial response was overwhelmingly enthusiastic… and
three-fold,” says Minervini.
She gives three reasons why.
“One, market-goers’ demands for fresh and wholesome locally-grown and
locally-produced goods, and their enthusiasm in supporting local
farmers do not diminish because of the cold weather. Two, the growing
season isn’t over simply because outdoor markets close at the end of
the summer; and three, the market generates a significant amount of
pedestrian traffic and sales for Village merchants.”
Overall, it’s a win-win situation for everyone involved.

EXTENDED SEASON
Local farms like First Fruits of Mancelona make the weekly market a priority.
Every Saturday, Ben and Jed Flynn of First Fruits make the hour-long
drive to Traverse City to sell their fruits, breads and jams.
They still have a few bushels of apples available, ranging from
Honeycrisp and Galas, to Fugis and Ida reds.
“The indoor market allows farmers to extend their season, generate
income over the winter months, and (give customers) their exceptional
winter-variety of produce and products,” says Minervini.
These include free-range chicken and emu, farm eggs, hormone-free and
grass-fed meats and dairy products, fresh baked goods, fruits,
vegetables and so much more, says Minervini.
Some vendors offer specialty products, like Dennetts Gluten Free
Creations in Buckley, who, along with their gluten-free foods, offer
almost completely dairy-free products.
Other vendors include Leelanau Cultured Veggies, Brimmers Honey, Herbs
and More, Ralph Humes Desserts, Natural Northern Foods; among multiple
Northern Michigan farms.

The Village Indoor Farmers Market runs every Saturday through May,
then will move outdoors for the summer season. It is located on the
grounds of the Grand Traverse Commons, 1200 West 11th St. in Traverse
City. For more information on the Village Farmers Market, visit
thevillagetc.com or call 941-1900.

 
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