Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Indoor farm market
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Indoor farm market

Erin Cowell - February 1st, 2010
Indoor Farm Market
Winter can’t stop shopping scene at the Mercato
By Erin Crowell
Brick and stone shelter local shoppers from frigid temps at Building
50 of the Grand Traverse Commons. Nestled in the hills on the west
side of town, the old state asylum turned trendy condo/retail site is
now home to an indoor farmers market, happening every Saturday from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. in The Village, a community of shops and restaurants
located on the garden level -- or Mercato -- of the building.
The farmers market is no longer just a summer destination. With so
much focus on buying local, it’s only a matter of accommodation –
hosting vendors year-round in an accessible location, sans weather
conditions.
“The Village is reminiscent of an old-world marketplace where people
engage in meaningful human interactions – a community gathering
place,” says Mini Minervini, marketing director at the Commons.
The winter indoor market is simply an answer to what happens to The
Village’s outdoor summer market once the weather turns south.
You’ll find the same quality goods at this indoor market, along with
all the Village shops of the Commons, including Boutique A La Vie,
Premier Floral, Silver Fox Jewelry, Creation Farm, Gallery 50 and many
more.

THE LOCAL MARKET
“It’s awesome,” says vendor Katie Kearney of Naturally Nutty in
Traverse City. “There needs to be more of this. It keeps the local
market going.”
Naturally Nutty specializes in all types of nut and seed butters
including their butter toffee peanut butter, white chocolate cherry
almond butter, mocha peanut butter and organic sunflower and pumpkin
seed butters, among others.
Kearney is one of several vendors at the Village Farmers Market. It’s
only the inaugural year, but this season has turned out big crowds and
profitable sales.
“The initial response was overwhelmingly enthusiastic… and
three-fold,” says Minervini.
She gives three reasons why.
“One, market-goers’ demands for fresh and wholesome locally-grown and
locally-produced goods, and their enthusiasm in supporting local
farmers do not diminish because of the cold weather. Two, the growing
season isn’t over simply because outdoor markets close at the end of
the summer; and three, the market generates a significant amount of
pedestrian traffic and sales for Village merchants.”
Overall, it’s a win-win situation for everyone involved.

EXTENDED SEASON
Local farms like First Fruits of Mancelona make the weekly market a priority.
Every Saturday, Ben and Jed Flynn of First Fruits make the hour-long
drive to Traverse City to sell their fruits, breads and jams.
They still have a few bushels of apples available, ranging from
Honeycrisp and Galas, to Fugis and Ida reds.
“The indoor market allows farmers to extend their season, generate
income over the winter months, and (give customers) their exceptional
winter-variety of produce and products,” says Minervini.
These include free-range chicken and emu, farm eggs, hormone-free and
grass-fed meats and dairy products, fresh baked goods, fruits,
vegetables and so much more, says Minervini.
Some vendors offer specialty products, like Dennetts Gluten Free
Creations in Buckley, who, along with their gluten-free foods, offer
almost completely dairy-free products.
Other vendors include Leelanau Cultured Veggies, Brimmers Honey, Herbs
and More, Ralph Humes Desserts, Natural Northern Foods; among multiple
Northern Michigan farms.

The Village Indoor Farmers Market runs every Saturday through May,
then will move outdoors for the summer season. It is located on the
grounds of the Grand Traverse Commons, 1200 West 11th St. in Traverse
City. For more information on the Village Farmers Market, visit
thevillagetc.com or call 941-1900.

 
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