Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Shoes & snacks for backpacks
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Shoes & snacks for backpacks

Erin Crowell - February 15th, 2010
“Shoe and Snacks” for Backpacks
By Erin Crowell
“Every student needs a backpack.”
It’s the reason why the Traverse Bay Sunrise Rotary Club has donated over 7,700 backpacks to area elementary and high school students.
Since 2004, the Backpacks for Kids program has become the signature event for Rotary members, providing area students with vital school supplies and the means to carry them.
This year, the Rotary Club will host its first “Shoe & Snacks for Backpacks” fundraiser on February 21 at Timber Ridge Resort in Traverse City. Participants will enjoy a snowshoe hike along the groomed trails with complimentary hot beverages and snacks. The $15 registration fee sponsors one fully supplied backpack for the 2010 Backpack for Kids program. The maximum fee for families is $25, with additional donations welcome.
Backpacks for elementary students contain supplies such as markers, crayons, craft paper, hand sanitizer, pencil boxes and scissors. The supply for high school students “gets a little heftier,” says event coordinator Jessica Luckey. “They carry more books, and calculators, notebooks, pens and pencils.”
In August, Rotary members and volunteers stuff backpacks via assembly line and then have the bags shipped to two central locations, just in time for the new school year.
The Rotary Club, partnered with Traverse Area Public Schools, provides 1,000-1,500 packs to area school children each year. Last year, the program donated 1,300 backpacks – 100 of those going to high school students, and the other half to elementary students.
Every year, TCAPS gives the Rotary a list of students eligible for the program. Although the program started with primarily TCAPS students in mind, it’s not limited to students in that school district, says program director David Payne.
“We’re reaching out to Benzie, Manistee…programs all over the region.”
Last year, the program included specific bags for the TBA ISD programs. Payne explains schools outside of the Grand Traverse area can obtain backpacks too.
Other surrounding rotary clubs have requested information on the backpack program to be implemented into their own communities, says Luckey.

MAIN FOCUS
The total cost for collecting items and distributing backpacks is around $22,000.
“We dedicate a majority of club resources, both money and manpower,” says Payne. “It’s our main focus every year.”
But why backpacks?
“Everyone needs a backpack, and with more and more people losing jobs, and economic hardships taking a strong hold in the area, it’s something we identified as one less thing for someone to worry about,” says Payne.
The event at Timber Ridge will be a first-time fundraiser for the program, something of a crapshoot, according to Payne.
“We have no idea what to expect. Are we going to make a couple dollars? Are we going to lose money and not do it again? I’m pretty sure we won’t lose money, but you just never know. For one thing, it’s another thing to keep the momentum going. It’s another way to create awareness and know who we are.”

You can help donate a stuffed backpack by participating in the snowshoe trek at Timber Ridge Resort in Traverse City, on Sunday, February 21, from 2-4 p.m. $15 fee sponsors one fully stuffed backpack, a fun trek and hot beverages and goodies. Families can participate for $25. Snowshoe rentals are available at $5/pair through GT Cycle. Advance registration is encouraged. Visit tcsunriserotary.org or call Jessica Luckey at 932-6238.
Those interested in the Backpacks for Kids Program may contact David Payne at 231-313-9653 or email: dmpayne18@yahoo.com.

 
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