Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Books · A Mennnonite memeoir
. . . .

A Mennnonite memeoir

Erin Crowell - March 1st, 2010
A Mennonite Memoir
By Erin Crowell
On the heels of its first comedy festival, Northern Michigan will get
another dose of humor when the National Writers Series presents “An
Evening with Rhoda Janzen,” on March 5, at the City Opera House, in
downtown Traverse City.
Janzen will present her humorous and candid memoir, “Mennonite in a
Little Black Dress,” the story of how—at the age of 43—she returned to
her conservative childhood Mennonite community after a 25-year absence
in order to recover from two traumatic experiences: a car accident
that left her with a cracked patella, two broken ribs, a fractured
clavicle and a concussion; and a divorce from a man who left her for
“Bob the Guy from Gay.com.”
The former poet laureate of UCLA, now an assistant professor of
English at Hope College in Holland, shared a phone conversation with
the Northern Express on what it’s like growing up Mennonite and
learning to handle the tough stuff with humor.
NE: You take these horrible situations and turn them into humor that
is just hilarious. Would you call it a coping mechanism?
Rhoda Janzen: I think humor is a coping mechanism, and for me it’s one
of the ways that I could work toward gratitude and clarity; but in
terms of developing it for literary style, I’m just now beginning to
do this. Since I’m new to memoir writing and everything outside of
poetry, it’s kind of a process. I’m sort of investigating.

NE: Would you call the memoir a long and tough process?
Janzen: No, actually, you know what? It was strangely easy. I wrote
the bulk of it in one month, sitting in my parent’s gazebo; and I just
wrote all day long. I had my little ritual. I ran six miles, took a
shower, went out to the gazebo and then boom, suddenly it’s dinner
time.

NE: If you had a name for it, what would you call your style of writing?
Janzen: In the memoir? I would call it wry humor.

NE: Any particular reason?
Janzen: Well, ‘wry’” in the sense that I think things are always
funnier if you’re aware of the largest implications of self and
culture. So it’s not a slapstick humor. I’m not sticking my head in
the sand because I don’t want to confront my life. Through thoughtful
confrontation with your issues in your life, you’ll find humor.

NE: Would you say you get your humor from your mother? She seems to
have this oblivious innocence and it comes off really funny.
(In the book, Janzen’s mother suggests she start dating again and
offers the notion of dating Waldemar – Janzen’s first cousin. Janzen’s
mother defends her position saying, “I think that the Lord appreciates
a man on a tractor more than a man smoking marijuana in his pajamas. I
know I do.”)
Janzen: (laughs) you know both of my parents have a great sense of
humor and I think they modeled that for us.

NE: Obviously you live a more secular life these days. Are there
still certain Mennonite principles that you still follow?
Janzen: Yeah I do, the Mennonite theology is very attractive to me.
And, I also feel as the Mennonites do – that if you want to promote
your own spiritual growth, you need to make some choices between how
you live and what you value. I deliberately don’t expose myself to
violence. I don’t like watching violent movies. I do things that
promote what I think is spiritually healthy: meditation, exercise,
things like that.

NE: What did your parents think of the book?
Janzen: Well, my mom read it before it went to press and she made some
suggestions, which I took, and she is cool with it. She is proud of me
and thinks I’m operating fully in my skill set and she’s proud of me
for that reason. She’s a little surprised at some of the controversial
reactions of the Mennonite community. When I asked my father, he said
he was proud too. He laughed, he cried.

NE: What do you mean by controversy?
Janzen: Well, it’s a memoir and so there’s going to be all kinds of
reactions. I know some Mennonites who think the humor is disrespectful
or some people who are horrified that I would publicly talk about an
issue like divorce. One of the women at my mom’s church said, “Well,
we certainly won’t be putting her book in the church library with
language like that.” There have been all kinds of reactions.

Rhoda Janzen will be the second featured speaker at the 2010 National
Writers Series. She will appear at the City Opera House, in Traverse
City, on March 5. Doors open at 6 p.m. with the event starting at 7
p.m. Following the presentation—which includes an on-stage interview
with series co-founder and New York Times best-selling author Doug
Stanton—there will be a reception with a cash bar, appetizers and book
signing. Advance tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for seniors. Tickets
at the door are $20. Cost for students is $5. For more info, visit
nationalwritersseries.com.

 
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