Letters

Letters 07-28-14

Worry About Legals

I can’t figure out what perplexes me more, the misinformation everywhere in the media or those who believe it to be true. Take the Hobby Lobby case; as a company that is primarily owned by a religious family, they felt their First Amendment rights were infringed upon by the “Affordable” Care Act...

Stop Labeling and Enjoy

I have been struggling to find a simple way of understanding for myself the concepts of conservative, liberal, and moderation as it relates to our social interactions with each other...

Proposal One & The Public Good

Are you kidding me? Another corporate giveaway with loopholes for large corporations who rule us? Hasn’t our corrupt and worthless governor done enough to raise taxes, provide corporate welfare, unjustly tax pensions, and shut down elected officials with his emergency manager racket...

The Truth About Road Workers

Apparently Mr. Kachadurian did not catch on to the fact that the MDOT Employee Memorial in Clare is a tribute to highway workers who lost their lives building our transportation systems. It was paid for by current and former MDOT employees who likely knew some of these people personally...

Idiotic and Misguided

As a seasonal resident, I always look forward to reading your paper, if only because of the idiotic letters to the editor and off the wall columns...


Home · Articles · News · Books · A Mennnonite memeoir
. . . .

A Mennnonite memeoir

Erin Crowell - March 1st, 2010
A Mennonite Memoir
By Erin Crowell
On the heels of its first comedy festival, Northern Michigan will get
another dose of humor when the National Writers Series presents “An
Evening with Rhoda Janzen,” on March 5, at the City Opera House, in
downtown Traverse City.
Janzen will present her humorous and candid memoir, “Mennonite in a
Little Black Dress,” the story of how—at the age of 43—she returned to
her conservative childhood Mennonite community after a 25-year absence
in order to recover from two traumatic experiences: a car accident
that left her with a cracked patella, two broken ribs, a fractured
clavicle and a concussion; and a divorce from a man who left her for
“Bob the Guy from Gay.com.”
The former poet laureate of UCLA, now an assistant professor of
English at Hope College in Holland, shared a phone conversation with
the Northern Express on what it’s like growing up Mennonite and
learning to handle the tough stuff with humor.
NE: You take these horrible situations and turn them into humor that
is just hilarious. Would you call it a coping mechanism?
Rhoda Janzen: I think humor is a coping mechanism, and for me it’s one
of the ways that I could work toward gratitude and clarity; but in
terms of developing it for literary style, I’m just now beginning to
do this. Since I’m new to memoir writing and everything outside of
poetry, it’s kind of a process. I’m sort of investigating.

NE: Would you call the memoir a long and tough process?
Janzen: No, actually, you know what? It was strangely easy. I wrote
the bulk of it in one month, sitting in my parent’s gazebo; and I just
wrote all day long. I had my little ritual. I ran six miles, took a
shower, went out to the gazebo and then boom, suddenly it’s dinner
time.

NE: If you had a name for it, what would you call your style of writing?
Janzen: In the memoir? I would call it wry humor.

NE: Any particular reason?
Janzen: Well, ‘wry’” in the sense that I think things are always
funnier if you’re aware of the largest implications of self and
culture. So it’s not a slapstick humor. I’m not sticking my head in
the sand because I don’t want to confront my life. Through thoughtful
confrontation with your issues in your life, you’ll find humor.

NE: Would you say you get your humor from your mother? She seems to
have this oblivious innocence and it comes off really funny.
(In the book, Janzen’s mother suggests she start dating again and
offers the notion of dating Waldemar – Janzen’s first cousin. Janzen’s
mother defends her position saying, “I think that the Lord appreciates
a man on a tractor more than a man smoking marijuana in his pajamas. I
know I do.”)
Janzen: (laughs) you know both of my parents have a great sense of
humor and I think they modeled that for us.

NE: Obviously you live a more secular life these days. Are there
still certain Mennonite principles that you still follow?
Janzen: Yeah I do, the Mennonite theology is very attractive to me.
And, I also feel as the Mennonites do – that if you want to promote
your own spiritual growth, you need to make some choices between how
you live and what you value. I deliberately don’t expose myself to
violence. I don’t like watching violent movies. I do things that
promote what I think is spiritually healthy: meditation, exercise,
things like that.

NE: What did your parents think of the book?
Janzen: Well, my mom read it before it went to press and she made some
suggestions, which I took, and she is cool with it. She is proud of me
and thinks I’m operating fully in my skill set and she’s proud of me
for that reason. She’s a little surprised at some of the controversial
reactions of the Mennonite community. When I asked my father, he said
he was proud too. He laughed, he cried.

NE: What do you mean by controversy?
Janzen: Well, it’s a memoir and so there’s going to be all kinds of
reactions. I know some Mennonites who think the humor is disrespectful
or some people who are horrified that I would publicly talk about an
issue like divorce. One of the women at my mom’s church said, “Well,
we certainly won’t be putting her book in the church library with
language like that.” There have been all kinds of reactions.

Rhoda Janzen will be the second featured speaker at the 2010 National
Writers Series. She will appear at the City Opera House, in Traverse
City, on March 5. Doors open at 6 p.m. with the event starting at 7
p.m. Following the presentation—which includes an on-stage interview
with series co-founder and New York Times best-selling author Doug
Stanton—there will be a reception with a cash bar, appetizers and book
signing. Advance tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for seniors. Tickets
at the door are $20. Cost for students is $5. For more info, visit
nationalwritersseries.com.

 
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