Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play: Big Phony, Field Music, FM...
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4Play: Big Phony, Field Music, FM Belfast, Juliana Hatfield

Kristi Kates - May 3rd, 2010
Big Phony - Kicking Punching Bags - BPM
Big Phony, aka NYC-Los Angeles coast-hopper Bobby Choy, has quietly stayed under the radar, crafting folk-pop tracks overloaded with catchy melody after catchy melody, all equally understated via Choy’s carefully wistful, mellow performance skills. Songs like the concise “Short Intermission,” “Talk of the Town,” and live, self-deprecating favorite “Girls Like You Don’t Go For Guys Like Me” recollect the folk-pop stylings of Elliott Smith, while his voice echoes that of Sean Lennon or Smith himself; he probably won’t remain under the radar for long.





Field Music - (Measure) - Memphis Recordings
Technically an eponymous set with the “Measure” subtitle (to separate it from the band’s eponymous debut), Field Music’s latest offers up 20 tracks of the quartet’s guitar-focused English art-rock, complete with snippets of influence from Fleetwood Mac, Roxy Music, and The Smiths, among others. Blues-inflused “Each Time is a New Time” is one of the disc’s more notable tracks, as are the more poppy “The Rest is Noise,” “See You Later,” and the slacker anthem “Them That Do Nothing,” all flourished with plenty of FM’s subtle guitar work.




FM Belfast - How to Make Friends - Kimi Records
The second “FM” of this week’s column, this particular one hails from Iceland (despite the Irish-referential band name) and crafts a sound best described as earthy electronica. From quirky songs about getting new eyeglasses (“Optical”) to the more serious, cold synths of tracks like “President” and “VHS,” the band - whose members constantly change number based on “who happens to be around” - have a little more than the usual sense of humor, too - as evidenced by their mellow interpretation of Technotronic’s “Pump Up the Jam.”




Juliana Hatfield - Peace and Love - Ye Olde Records
Former Blake Babies bandmate and ongoing Evan (Lemonheads) Dando muse Hatfield set forth to track her latest album all by herself - literally - writing, performing, producing, engineering, and mixing the album alone. The evolution of her latest crop of songs might seem to be relationship-focused at first, but is actually as much about randomly pensive moments, from the crunchy-guitar’d “What Is Wrong” to the reflective “Why Can’t We Love Each Other” and Hatfield’s ode to Dando himself (“Evan”.) It’s both accomplished and personal.

 
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