Happy Hour

A weekly snapshot of Happy Hours around the region…


FireFly
Everyday, open-7 p.m., $1.75 highballs, $2.50 house chardonnay, $2.00 drafts, $1.00 off everything else.
310 Cass St., Traverse City

Fred's
Sunday-Thursday, 3-6 p.m., $1 off all drinks.
422 North 5th St., Roscommon

Lulu's Bistro
Thursdays, 5-9 p.m., $3 wells, $2 off drafts, select $5 wines.
213 N. Bridge St., Bellaire

Boyne River Inn
Everyday, 3-6 p.m., 1/4 off drinks.
229 Water St., Boyne City
 
Rendezvous Lounge, Odawa Casino
Thursday & Friday, $2.25 domestic drafts, $3.25 well drinks, $3.25 house wine.
1760 Lears Rd., Petoskey

Choice Bits!

Round-the-region snapshots of the dining scene. 

RUTHIE'S CHICKEN & DAIRY TWIST: Roasted chicken and ice cream, malts and shakes.
201 N. Bridge Ln., Bellaire. 213­-533­-8538.

MONEY'S PLATTE RIVER INN:
Practically an Up North institution, the place to find out the latest fishing or snowmobile news from the locals and visitors who gather for their hearty breakfasts, steaks, burgers, soup & salad bar, & homemade desserts.
10921 Main St., Honor. 231­ 352­6585.

BC LANES FAMILY ENTERTAIMENT CENTER:
When you've worked up an appetite from all the bowling and karaoke that Boyne City Lanes has to offer, you'll find a selection of hearty fare to choose from, including homemade soups & desserts. Cocktails are served at the Lanes,with live entertainment and glow ­bowling nights.
1199 West Boyne Road, 231-­582­-6353.

CHINA ONE:
Open 7 days a week for lunch & dinner. Full Chinese menu, as well as Hunan & Szechuan entrees.  Daily specials, special combination plates,  a lunch & dinner All You Can Eat Buffet. 
616 S. Mitchell St., Cadillac, 231­-876­-8888.

A&W:
Take a trip back to the '50s where chili dogs & frosted mugs of root beer are still served up by carhops at this All ­American institution. Elvis has been known to make an appearance during their annual summer “A&W Cruise Night” in August, as do cars from the 50’s and 60’s that we remember well.
At the bottom of the hill, 21 Lake St., Frankfort,  231-­352-­9021.

BIG BUCK BREWERY & STEAKHOUSE:
From Antler Ale to Wolverine Wheat, Big Buck specializes in microbrewed beers. Offering the usual beef and buffalo burgers, steaks, and ribs, plus more unusual fare, like their portabella sandwich with red onion marmalade and provolone cheese.
550 S. Wisconsin Avenue, Gaylord, 989­-732-­5781.

THE NEW YORK RESTAURANT:
A refined atmosphere, subdued lighting, and an appetizing selection of epicurean treats awaits the diner at this Harbor Springs corner landmark. Menu selections range from their smoked whitefish ravioli appetizer to their Atlantic salmon, baked polenta and eggplant, tomato basil fettuccine, or filet mignon ­ and their brunches include one of the best versions of Eggs Benedict around.
101 State Street, downtown across from Bar Harbor, 231­-526-­1904.

EMPIRE VILLAGE INN: 
Pool tables, a full bar, friendly service and a varied menu make the Village Inn popular with families and locals.  Dinners include Lamb Skewers, Blue Corn Enchiladas, Charbroiled Whitefish, Lasagna and Ribeye.  Also burgers, sandwiches, salads, appetizers and pizza.  Lunch and Dinner.
Just north of the blinking light 116601 Lacorre Ave. on M­22,  Empire. 231-326­-5101.

JESPERSON'S:
One of Petoskey's first restaurants, Jesperson's is famous for homemade pies and fresh turkey. Breakfast and lunch.
312 Howard, Petoskey, 231­-347­-3601.
 
CUPPA JOE:
Located in Building 50, grilled panini's, soups, wraps, baked goods, specialty coffees and teas.
1200 W. 11th St., Traverse City, 231-­947­-7740.

Home · Articles · News · Dining · Mead: Tha ale of wine
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Mead: Tha ale of wine

Danielle Horvath - August 24th, 2009
Mead: The “Ale of Wine”
combines honey & cherries

By Danielle Horvath 8/24/09

Mead -- made from local honey and cherries and formulated with green tea, hops and spices -- is making its debut at several area establishments. Hand-crafted in Lake Ann, it is like a wine cooler, but not as sweet or artificial tasting, and packs more punch.
Bruce Grossman, Acoustic Brewing Company owner, musician and zymurgist (one who takes care of fermentation), landed on the product after years of brewing beer and decided to experiment with mead, or honey-wine. Grossman began with small batches over the past several years. He has a small circle of friends and family that tried it and understood what he was going for.
The end result is Acoustic Cherry Draft Mead, a honey-cherry wine that is fermented and flavored with natural fruit and spices, carbonated and served chilled. “I wanted something quaffable like a beer but made out of wine. It’s the closest I could come to making beer under a wine license. I call it ‘the ale of wine.’”
Grossman originally was going to pursue opening a small microbrewery but along the way saw the advantage of a wine maker’s license as opposed to a brewery. He purchased brewing equipment a few years ago and went about converting his garage into a home-based business.

STRANGLEHOLD
“The regulations in Michigan on micro-breweries prohibit self-distribution and do not allow for an off-site retail store,” he says. “That puts a stranglehold on start-up entrepreneurs. In my opinion, it is an antiquated, over-lobbied system of regulation that should be changed.”
He also realized that there is a lot of great beer already being brewed in the area, but saw an opportunity for experimenting with wine-based drinks.
“I experimented a lot in the kitchen with hard ciders, perry (cider made from pears,) and fruit wines. Honey is a natural preservative, requires no special refrigeration and has great healing qualities. It lacks acid, so to balance that, I added local tart cherries which are naturally acidic and balanced it with hops and green tea to get the tannins,” Grossman says.
Draft mead is available at a few establishments around the area, including the Mayfair Tavern in Elberta, the Betsie Bay Inn in Frankfort, the Loading Dock in Traverse City, the Village Inn in Empire, Mistwood Golf Course in Beulah, and O’Keefe’s in Suttons Bay. A nice touch is the use of mini-guitars for tap-pulls on the draft product, which have been a hit with bar owners and customers alike.
Grossman is planning to begin bottling the product this fall, and it will be available in limited supply at some area retail stores. For more information, contact him at 231-883-2012 or check out the website at drinkacoustic.com.




All About Mead

Mead or honey-wine is the oldest adult beverage on the planet, older than wine made from grapes.
Mead comes in a dazzling array of flavors, depending on the type of honey, the brewing process used, and the added things like fruit, herbs, spices, even peppers.
Great quantities of mead were made and drunk during the 1,000 or so years from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Reformation.
The importance of using good-quality water was also recognized early, and many old recipes call for rainwater. In medieval Russia, snow was often used.
The national drink of Ethiopia is T’ej, a golden sweet honey-wine; it is made in private homes for family consumption and is not sold commercially. Each household has its own family recipe and variations in taste result from the type of honey used, temperature, climate, materials and utensils and the time involved.



 
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