Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Isadora‘s Secret by Mardi...
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Isadora‘s Secret by Mardi Link

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli - October 19th, 2009
A Nun Meets a Tragic End in Isadore’s Secret
Isadore’s Secret
Mardi Link
U of M Press
$22.95

By Elizabeth Buzzelli 10/19/09

In 1907 a young nun was murdered and buried beneath Holy Rosary Church in the Leelanau County village of Isadore. Isadore’s Secret, by true-crime writer, Mardi Link, captures the despicable crime, and extends the fascination, disgust, and sadness to yet another generation.
It was the summer of 1907. Sister Janina, 33, disappeared from the convent in the bucolic village of Isadore, a town of Polish immigrants devoted to family, priest, and their church. At that time the clergy held sway over people who were superstitious, uneducated, and—like small towns everywhere—inundated with gossip. Rumors ran through town. It was said the nun had run off, leaving the convent because she was unhappy with her life there. Soon it was rumored that she was pregnant.
Father Andrew, the parish priest, searched frantically for her. He hired a bloodhound and a detective. He went from house to house. He contacted anyone who might know of her whereabouts. From that day onward, Father Andrew acted like a man possessed; like a man unable to believe what had happened in his own parish, and like a man with secrets so huge one lifetime wouldn’t be enough to contain them.
Years later. A new priest has been assigned to Holy rosary, Father Edward—with moral lapses of his own. Father Andrew has been sent off into one of the limbos of the Catholic Church—passed from parish to parish, not settling into his own church for years, and never able to shrug off the scandal of Holy Rosary and Isadore. The new priest wanted to build a tall, red brick edifice that would do him and the community proud. There was one problem. Another priest whispered to him, “What will you do about the bones buried in the basement?”

UNRAVELING SECRET
With that the secret of Isadore began to unravel. A poor woman’s live burial came to light, and the sins and omissions of the Church and the men and women who were a part of it slowly surfaced.
What Link has shown so well is that there isn’t one person to be blamed in this crime. Although someone was arrested, tried, and convicted—it wasn’t the work of only that woman. At least not morally. Certainly Father Andrew, the tortured priest, has his share to answer for; also the priest who gossiped about a confession which should have been sealed in the confessional; also the daughter who lied on the witness stand, and members of law enforcement who might have tortured the accused—or not. And then there are lawyers who should have been devoted to truth rather than to the man who paid them.
The nuns, who were at the convent when Sister Janina disappeared, were never called to testify as to what the church, and the charged housekeeper, were like at the time; what they knew of an affair between Father Andrew and the nun. Since Father Andrew paid for his housekeeper’s legal defense, and eventually got her sentence commuted with the kind of fervor only a man with a heavy conscience might display, it is still a mystery what he knew, when he knew it, and if he could have stopped any of the events.

RUINED LIVES
Lying and hiding the truth helped no one—not in the end. The lives of two priests were ruined—and probably for good cause. A murderer paid only a small part of her sentence for her heinous crime. Questions were left unanswered which haven’t gone away. It seems Sister Janina’s soul is not at rest despite the moment in the courtroom when a nun demanded attention.
“Judge,” said a female voice from the gallery, “may we have a moment with our Sister?” With every pair of eyes upon her, Mother Antonia stood and faced Judge Mayne. Following the quiet sister came others. Sixteen of her Sisters stood and filed silently to the front of the room, circled the table where the skeleton lay, and clasped each other’s hands. Their shoulders heaved with silent weeping, and Mother Antonia led them in the recitation of their ritual prayer for the dead.
This was all the ceremony Sister Janina was ever to receive.
In the 1970s, Michigan playwright, Milan Stitt, who had once studied for the priesthood, wrote a Broadway play called The Runner Stumbles, about a priest and a nun, who fall in love. The nun is soon pregnant, then murdered. The priest was tried for her murder. Stitt admitted the play was based on a true Michigan crime. The play became a film with Dick Van Dyke playing the priest. Again, it is the priest who is charged with the crime of passion—killing the nun when she revealed her secret because he couldn’t face what he’d done and the man that he’d become.
Link, after listing the sources she consulted, the reams of records she went through, the people she talked to, has sifted through the myths and the facts, coming up with what is a credible account of the nun’s murder and the people responsible—some in small part, some in large. The story isn’t only sad, but contains much of human failing in the face of solemn vows, and much of men in power using that power in cruel and deceitful ways to protect themselves and the institution they served. But the book isn’t an indictment of the Church—the priests involved are few. It certainly isn’t an expose of the people of Isadore, who were more duped than involved with what happened there. It is more a chronicle of men, only too human, fighting demons far beyond them.
Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli can be reached at ebuzzelli@aol.com





 
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