Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Earth Day Parade
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Earth Day Parade

Erin Crowell - April 19th, 2010
Earth Day Parade offers environmental fun for families
By Erin Crowell
“We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.” ~Native American Proverb
On April 24, Northern Michigan residents will take to the streets of Traverse City for the Earth Day Parade. The route begins at Central Grade School at 1 p.m. and will continue on Seventh Street to Eighth, then on to State Street, ending at Park Street.
The Earth Day Parade is coordinated by Penny Krebiehl, founder of Little Artshram – a non-profit community of artists, musicians and environmentalists committed to learning, celebrating and co-creating with area youth and their families in the Grand Traverse region.
“We’ve always had a large caring environmental community,” says Krebiehl, “and I think the net is reorganizing itself in a much needed way. There is still a little bit of work to be done as far as pulling people into the same agenda.
“For me, Earth Day is that. I did a mentoring program in Minneapolis before I moved to the area where people would come together and talk about what they were concerned about, as far as the environment goes. Their May Day Parade focused on those concerns, so when I moved to Northern Michigan, I thought, ‘this is the way we can get kids involved with the environment.’”
Today, the Earth Day Parade encourages children, adults and families to express their concerns through story-telling. Each year, the parade has a unique theme. This year’s is “pedal power.”
Preparation starts four months in advance, with area schools helping with decorations and costumes. “We’ve worked with a variety of kids in the five-county area,” says Krebiehl.

GRASSROOTS
Earth Day was born from a political demonstration. Its parent was the Vietnam War “teach-ins” during the late 1960s, where college students across the nation expressed their discontent with the government’s handling of foreign affairs.
Earth Day began in much the same way, with the announcement of a grassroots demonstration that would happen during the spring of 1970. However, this demonstration would be about the war on planet Earth – and the apparent lack of effort on behalf of politicians to do anything about it.
Its founder, Senator Gaylord Nelson, announced the idea at a Seattle conference in 1969 and word quickly spread. Before the first Earth Day, millions of people were already abuzz with excitement.
In an article posted on wilderness.org, Nelson wrote:

The response was electric. It took off like gangbusters. Telegrams, letters, and telephone inquiries poured in from all across the country. The American people finally had a forum to express its concern about what was happening to the land, rivers, lakes, and air - and they did so with spectacular exuberance… Earth Day worked because of the spontaneous response at the grassroots level. We had neither the time nor resources to organize 20 million demonstrators and the thousands of schools and local communities that participated. That was the remarkable thing about Earth Day. It organized itself.

Nelson passed away in July 2005 at the age of 89, but his vision continues, thanks to events such as the Earth Day Parade.
Krebiehl says, “For me, Earth Day is about growth – how we’re taking care of ourselves, our community, all species…not just ‘recycle, reuse.’ I feel the greatest costume I can wear is of myself.”

For information on how to volunteer for next year’s parade, call Penny Krebiehl at 231-510-3491. More information on the Earth Day Parade, as well as Little Artshram, can be found at www.littleartshram.org.

 
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