Letters 10-05-2015

Bravo Regarding the Sept. 28 Northern Express letter “Just The Facts” by Julie Racine, opinion column “E Pluribus Unum” by Thomas Kachadurian, and Spectator column “Fear Not” by Stephen Tuttle: Bravo. Bravo. Bravo....

Right On OMG. Julie Racine’s letter “Just the Facts” in the Sept. 28 issue said everything I was thinking. I totally agree. Amen sister...

Kachadurian’s Demeaning Sham Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion piece “E Pluribus Unum” is a very ill-informed perspective of American history. He attempts to portray our past as a homogenized national experience that has transcended any ethnic and regional differences with “the understanding” that our differences shouldn’t really matter...

Opinions Disguised As Facts Freedom of speech is a founding principle upon which our country prides itself, and because of this we all have a right to our opinion. It is when opinions are disguised as facts that we allow for ignorance to spread like wildfire...

Reject Your Own Stereotypes In his “E Pluribus Unum” column of 9/28, Mr. Kachadurian starts calmly enough with a simple definition and history of that famous motto from the Great “from many, one” seal of the U.S., but soon goes off the rhetorical rails. Alas, this heritage-sharing chat with neighbors soon turns into a dirty laundry list polemic, based on an us vs. them worldview...

Thanks For Just The Facts Thank you sooooo much to Julie in Marion for laying out the laundry list of right wing fabrications in her letter last week...

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4Play: White Stripes, Slash, Jakob Dylan, Peter Wolf

Kristi Kates - May 10th, 2010
White Stripes - Under Great Northern Lights- Warner Bros.
Recorded while Jack and Meg White undertook an ambitious tour across every province and territory in Canada, this album is the audio accompaniment to the film of the same name, capturing the Stripes’ emotional performances on all levels, from bowling alley sets to legendary theater venues. You’ll get familiar and more obscure tracks, from “Seven Nation Army” through “Icky Thump,” all presented with the powerful dual attack that this duo is capable of, and that’s less frequently captured on more controlled, sterile studio recordings.

Slash - Slash - DHR
Also pulling in more than a few guest musicians, former Guns ‘N Roses lead guitarist Slash sets the pace with his distinctive guitar stylings, while collaborating on a range of rock songs for his first solo (well, kinda solo) album. While Slash did most of the songwriting and arranging, his duties, surprisingly, are mostly as album mastermind and guitarist, while his pals take the spotlight, from The Cult’s Ian Astbury (“Ghost”) to Iggy Pop (“We’re All Gonna Die”) to Fergie (“Beautiful Dangerous”) and Soundgarden’s singer-gone solo Chris Cornell (“Promise”.)

Jakob Dylan - Women and Country - Sony
Following his work with The Wallflowers, frontman Jakob Dylan struck out on his own, stepping out from behind the shadows of both his band and his famed father (yes, Bob.) Now on his sophomore set, he enlists Grammy winner T Bone Burnett on production and shares mics with such guest vocalists as Neko Case and Kelly Hogan. Dylan’s own gravelly tones stay grounded yet are beautifully melodic on tracks like the jazz-inflected “Lend a Hand,” the ‘70s-esque “Smile...” and the instant classic ballad “Nothing But the Whole Wide World.”

Peter Wolf - Midnight Souvenirs - Verve
Wolf’s seventh studio set stays in his usual vein of storytelling songs that rely on the details as much as the melodies to get across their tales of woe and/or romance. This time around, Wolf sounds a little more hopeful then before as he duets with the likes of Shelby Lynne, Neko Case (again), and Merle Haggard on songs like the country-blues lament “Tragedy,” the rootsy “Overnight Lows,” and the encouraging “There’s Still Time.” As for Haggard, “It’s Too Late For Me” finds the two music veterans commisserating through the blues.

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