Letters

Letters 05-23-2016

Examine The Priorities Are you disgusted about closing schools, crumbling roads and bridges, and cuts everywhere? Investigate funding priorities of legislators. In 1985 at the request of President Reagan, Grover Norquist founded Americans for Tax Reform (ATR). For 30 years Norquist asked every federal and state candidate and incumbent to sign the pledge to vote against any increase in taxes. The cost of living has risen significantly since 1985; think houses, cars, health care, college, etc...

Make TC A Community For Children Let’s be that town that invests in children actively getting themselves to school in all of our neighborhoods. Let’s be that town that supports active, healthy, ready-to-learn children in all of our neighborhoods...

Where Are Real Christian Politicians? As a practicing Christian, I was very disappointed with the Rev. Dr. William C. Myers statements concerning the current presidential primaries (May 8). Instead of using the opportunity to share the message of Christ, he focused on Old Testament prophecies. Christ gave us a new commandment: to love one another...

Not A Great Plant Pick As outreach specialist for the Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network and a citizen concerned about the health of our region’s natural areas, I was disappointed by the recent “Listen to the Local Experts” feature. When asked for their “best native plant pick,” three of the four garden centers referenced non-native plants including myrtle, which is incredibly invasive...

Truth About Plants Your feature, “listen to the local experts” contains an error that is not helpful for the birds and butterflies that try to live in northwest Michigan. Myrtle is not a native plant. The plant is also known as vinca and periwinkle...

Ask the Real Plant Experts This letter is written to express my serious concern about a recent “Listen To Your Local Experts” article where local nurseries suggested their favorite native plant. Three of the four suggested non-native plants and one suggested is an invasive and cause of serious damage to Michigan native plants in the woods. The article is both sad and alarming...

My Plant Picks In last week’s featured article “Listen to the Local Experts,” I was shocked at the responses from the local “experts” to the question about best native plant pick. Of the four “experts” two were completely wrong and one acknowledged that their pick, gingko tree, was from East Asia, only one responded with an excellent native plant, the serviceberry tree...

NOTE: Thank you to TC-based Eagle Eye Drone Service for the cover photo, taken high over Sixth Street in Traverse City.

Home · Articles · News · Music · The Energizert: Laith Al-Sadi
. . . .

The Energizert: Laith Al-Sadi

Kristi Kates - May 17th, 2010
The Energizer:Blues rocker Laith Al-Saadi gets a charge out of connecting
By Kristi Kates
Guitarist/singer/songwriter Laith Al-Saadi hasn’t had a real job since
he was 15.
“Not having a day job is a great motivator to make sure that you keep
working (on your music),” Al-Saadi explains with a chuckle. “My last
and only ‘real job’ was working at a Sbarro in Briarwood Mall in Ann
Arbor,” he continues, “but as soon as I realized that I could make
money doing what I loved, I was out of there. My high school blues
band, Blue Vinyl, built up a solid following, and I put all my
energies into booking us and writing material for the band.”
Listeners will enjoy an earful of that energy when Al-Saadi performs
this Saturday at Crooked Tree Arts Center in Petoskey.
Al-Saadi, who attended the alternative-education Community High School
in Ann Arbor (“it has an amazing jazz program, and great support for
the arts” he says), spent most of his high school years playing four
to five times a week with the school’s jazz combos as well as with his
own band. He still lives in Ann Arbor, and credits the school with
helping form the basis for what would become his career.
“It helped me get a taste of what it was like to be a working musician
- it gave me confidence that I could make my living doing the thing
that brings the most happiness to myself and others,” he explains.

CLASSIC INFLUENCES
That philosophy continues into today, with Al-Saadi now promoting his
sophomore album, In the Round (currently available on iTunes and CD
Baby.) His latest set, Al-Saadi says, is “still rooted” in the blues,
as was his first album, Long Time Coming; but the new songs are more
focused, and also feature a wider range of classic rock influences
from the ‘60s and ‘70s on tracks like “Chains,” “Before Too Long,” and
“No One Left to Blame.”
“On my first album, I used many more musicians,” Al-Saadi says, “three
bassists, two drummers, and two keyboardists, plus a cellist; on the
new record, I used the same musicians throughout the entire project.”
His band remains a constant in his life, as well, with Mark Damian on
drums and David Stearns on the bass; but Al-Saadi’s eclectic talents
are reflected in the setlist mix at his live shows, which he says will
feature a blend of “original music, blues, soul, and rock n’ roll, all
presented within a jazz sensibility.” Listeners can expect a lot of
improvisation, as well.
“Every song is different each time we play it because of that
element,” Al-Saadi enthuses.
Al-Saadi’s improvisational instincts also lend themselves to how his
audiences react, which is part of the live-performance draw for the
musician himself.
“I love to connect with my audiences,” he says, “there is nothing like
the feeling that you are all experiencing the same moment
collectively. The energy generated by a good audience can really
propel you, as an artist, to the next level. That is another reason
why we love our music to be spontaneous. It IS music of the moment,
and we can go along with how the audience makes us feel and how we
feel to make sure that each show is custom-tailored to each audience.”

LOCAL FAVORITE
His Northern Michigan audiences began to take note of Al-Saadi back in
1996 - and 14 years later, “Up North” remains a favorite place for him
to perform.
“I began playing in Traverse City in the summer of 1996 at Dill’s Olde
Towne Saloon on Union Street, which I did for two summers,” Al-Saadi
explains. “The following year, I spent the entire year up in Bellaire
where I played at Schuss Mountain/Shanty Creek as a Schussycat - and
then I got my own band to be the house band through the ski season. I
always love coming back to Northern Michigan to play - it is beautiful
and the people are great. TC will always have a big place in my heart.
It feels like a second home.”

Laith Al-Saadi will perform a BlissFest concert at the Crooked Tree
Arts Center in Petoskey on May 22 at 9 pm. For tickets, visit
www.blissfest.org or telephone 231-348-7047; for additional
information on Al-Saadi, stop by www.laithmusic.com.


 
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