Letters

Letters 11-24-2014

Dangerous Votes You voted for Dr. Dan. Thanks!Rep. Benishek failed to cosponsor H.R. 601. It stops subsidies for big oil companies. He failed to cosponsor H.R. 1084. There is an exemption for hydraulic fracturing written into the Safe Drinking Water Act. H.R. 1084. It would require the contents of fracking fluids to be publicly disclosed to protect the public health.

Solar Is The Answer There have been many excellent letters about the need for our region, state and nation to take action on climate change. Now there is a viable solution to this ever-growing problem: Solar energy is the future.

Real Minimum Wage In 1966, a first class stamp cost 5 cents and minimum wage was $1.25. Today, a first class stamp is 49 cents, so federal minimum wage should be $11.25.

Doesn’t Seem Warmer I enjoy the “environmentalists” twisting themselves into pretzels trying to convince us that it is getting warmer. Sure it is... 

Home · Articles · News · Features · Charged up
. . . .

Charged up

Erin Crowell - May 31st, 2010
Charged Up: Supersized solar system powers new parking deck
By Erin Crowell
“The best market for solar is out over parking lots,” architect Robert
Noble said in a May 2010 Green Tech Media article. The founder of the
California-based company, Envision Solar, realized back in 2007 that
parking lot and carport roofs were ideal for collecting solar power.
The idea has been adopted on the roof of the new Old Town parking deck
in Traverse City. Currently under construction, the $7.9 million,
four-level structure will be home to one of the largest solar arrays
north of Muskegon.
“This is a huge array,” says Matthew Vajda, owner of Voltage Electric,
the Traverse City company which received the electrical bid on the
parking deck.
The 186-panel, 40.2 kilowatt array will provide close to 15% of the
structure’s total energy needs.
“Residential solar systems typically run around 5 kilowatts, which is
still a pretty large system,” Vajda says. “The 40.2 kilowatt array is
the largest north of Grand Rapids. They’re currently building a larger
system in Muskegon.”

LOCAL BIDS
The Old Town parking deck project is managed by CWS Architects, the TC
firm responsible for such projects as the much-anticipated Grand
Traverse YMCA building on Silver Lake Road and the Cathedral Barn at
the Grand Traverse Commons.
Having worked on other projects with Voltage Electric, CWS architect
Ray Kendra was comfortable with using the company as the solar
installer. “We are one of just a few local companies that won bids on
the parking deck,” says Vajda. “It’s very exciting.”
Vajda agrees that a parking deck is an optimal location for using solar.
“For one thing, you’ve got the real estate. You’ve got the roof – a
space that you wouldn’t use for anything else. Second, the electricity
is right where you need it, versus racks upon racks in the middle of a
field. Also, because it’s a LEED certified job (an economical and
environmental standard set by the U.S. Green Building Council), you
get more return on your investment doing solar, versus planting some
trees or shrubs,” he adds.
Although solar is pricey—this particular endeavor costing around
$240,000—the return is about 20 years, “a huge payback” according to
Vajda, who also serves as a board member on the Home Builders
Association.
Currently, Michigan is limited in its solar incentives, but Vajda
believes that will change soon.
“Green building is something I’m strongly in favor of and we really
just want to be ahead of the curve,” he adds.
Vajda anticipates solar array installation on the parking deck will be
completed sometime by the end of June, beginning of July.

Contact Voltage Electric at
231-946-3678 or visit them online at
www.voltageelectric.net.

 
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