Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Blue Stone Project
. . . .

Blue Stone Project

Kristi Kates - June 21st, 2010
Blue Stone Project brings Native American music to Petoskey
By Kristi Kates
He’s been nominated for a Grammy Award (2003, Best Native American
Recording) and has won a Native American Music Award for Group of the
Year (2004.) He’s half Navajo and half Northern Ute. He has
collaborated musically with John Densmore of The Doors as well as with
a plethora of other musicians on his own projects. The flutes that he
makes by hand are known world-wide.
And this is only scratching the surface of Native American musician
Aaron White’s story.

BURNING SKY
White, whose Blue Stone Project will be performing live in Petoskey at
the Odawa Casino Resort on Tuesday, June 22, says he’s been involved
with music his whole life in one form or another; Blue Stone is only
the latest of his musical endeavors.
“I started playing Native American music in 1993,” White explains, “I
started a group called Burning Sky with two other people. We were
pioneers of a new sound - mixing acoustic guitar with Native American
flute and percussion. I played guitar and also some flute in the band;
with the Blue Stone Project, I do the same, but not at the same time.”
After White’s first band dissolved in 2004, he became a solo artist,
performing all over the country, everywhere from Denver, Colorado to
New York City.
“Anywhere I could gig,” White says.
 As for working with Densmore, White met The Doors’ legendary drummer
at an awards show, and their connection continues to this day.
“At the show, we talked and ended up exchanging numbers,” White
remembers, “I was working on a project, so I called him and asked if
he would be interested in working with me. He said ‘yes,’ and we ended
up doing a workshop and a benefit concert. We have done various
benefits for cultural and environmental awareness, and we are still
collaborating on projects.”

RENOWNED INSTRUMENTS
Meanwhile, yet another of White’s talents was taking form, one that
would both further express his love of music, and also delve more into
his Native American heritage.
“I come from two different tribes,” White explains, “the Utes are from
the northeastern part of Utah, and the Navajos are from the Four
Corners region of northern Arizona.” (This is the only place in the
U.S. where the corners of four states - Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, and
Colorado - meet precisely together at one spot.) “I started making
Native American flutes 14 years ago,” he continues, “I wanted to make
my own instruments, and was curious how they worked.”
White says that the process of making flutes, while rewarding, is
“sometimes tedious.”
“The old way was to find a good branch, split it in half, hollow the
inside out and make your holes, and put it back together using tree
sap or pine pitch,” he explains, “now we have modern tools, so we use
good old wood glue.”
White’s handcrafted flutes are now purchased by a wide variety of
people around the globe, and have become a favorite collector’s item.
White also takes everything that he’s learned about the instruments
and shares that information with others.
“I give flute lectures at the Enchantment Resort in Arizona,” he says,
“I talk about the history of the flute and how the instrument has
evolved from the traditional to the contemporary music we hear today.”

BLUE STONE LIVE
Today, White’s music has taken the shape of the aforementioned Blue
Stone Project, which White began at the end of 2006.  Described as “a
rock oriented sound flavored by contemporary Native American life in
America,” the band’s first eponymous CD was recorded in 2007, and the
trio of experienced musicians has progressed steadily since then.
“I met Gary Rasmussen (bass/vocals) and Ed Michaels (drums/hand
percussions/vocals) at a festival in Silverton, Colorado,” White
explains, “I was on the bill, and they were on a tour with Alvin
Youngblood Hart. They are both very accomplished musicians and have
played with many performers - Gary with Iggy Pop, Fred “Sonic” Smith’s
Sonic Rendezvous Band, Patti Smith’s Band, and more; he is a Detroit
homeboy. Ed hails from Minnesota, and he has also been in good
company, working with Roy Rogers’ Blues Band, Buddy Miles, Marty Balin
(Jefferson Airplane), Derek Trucks - the list goes on and on.”
The Blue Stone Project performs mostly originals in their concerts,
plus a few surprises.
“We may also play a few songs people may recognize - with a touch of
Blue Stone flavor to them,” White says.
Native American culture will be additionally showcased through some of
the concert’s other special features.
“Our mix of music has a real down-to-earth feel to it,” White
continues, “and you can expect to be enlightened with stories and
culture as well. I always look forward to playing in Michigan every
year. It’s such a beautiful place - especially Up North in Petoskey.
We plan on having a good time.”

Aaron White/Blue Stone Project will be performing at the Odawa Casino
on June 22 at 7 p.m. For additional info, visit www.odawacasino.com or
call
877-442-6464 (toll free) or locally at 231-439-6100.  For more info on
Aaron White, visit www.whistlingwind.com; for more info on The Blue
Stone Project, visit
www.myspace.com/bluestoneproject.

 
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