Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Meet Amy Alkon‘s Better...
. . . .

Meet Amy Alkon‘s Better Half

Anne Stanton - February 8th, 2010
Meet Amy Alkon’s Better Half
By Anne Stanton
Thanks to Gregg Sutter, the Advice Goddess is coming to town on
February 11 to dish out her saucy advice on love at the City Opera
House, and to talk about her new book, I See Rude People.
Sutter is the researcher for Elmore Leonard, the reigning king of
crime writers. Sutter came to Traverse City last summer to accompany
Elmore and his crime-writing son, Peter Leonard, both of whom spoke
at a National Writers Series event, a new year-round book festival
that showcases nationally renowned writers.
When it was discovered Sutter is also the boyfriend of Amy Alkon, the
famed Advice Goddess, well that was interesting too. Alkon was asked
to kick off the 2010 National Writers Series season with her new
book. She enthusiastically agreed.
We reached Sutter at home in Los Angeles.

NE: I wanted to ask you what it’s like to be Amy’s boyfriend.
GS: As a rule, I don’t like talking about myself. But I don’t mind
talking about Amy. What do you think I’m going to say? It’s
wonderful to be her boyfriend. It’s always an adventure! One of her
friends called her “a force of nature” and it’s true. We’ve been
together a little over seven years and she still laughs at my jokes!
Seriously, she’s the kindest person I know. She makes everybody in
the room feel good. Did I mention that she’s beautiful?

NE: Do you and Amy live together?
GS: No. We like to miss each other. We both work at home and for most
of the time our home space and workspace are indistinguishable.
When we do get together, it’s always a happy occasion and we celebrate
our love for each other.

NE: Do you work with Amy?
GS: I shot the cover of her book, so that makes me her “official
photographer.” Normally, Amy will bounce ideas off me--things she’s
working on, she’s always trying to improve her craft. I do the same
with her. We’re constantly going back and forth on the phone, on
Skype, recently we added texting. Sometimes, when she’s having trouble
ending a column, she will call me in desperation and say,
“Say something funny!” It’s not that easy.

NE: So talk about this new book she just published, I See Rude People.

GS: The book evolved over many years. From her personal experiences,
Amy was able to bring together different aspects of everyday life she
finds rude and intolerable. She exposes rude people who try to make
the public space their private space. She speaks up when no one else
will. She stands up for herself and those around her. But I See Rude
People is not some self-righteous “manners manifesto.” Amy will be
the first to tell you that she is not setting herself apart as a
paragon of virtue. She’s just observing and reacting to the things
that go on in every day life. Rude People is as entertaining as it is
instructive.

NE: I sometimes think that loud talkers on cell phones--especially
those in a business meeting--want people to know how important they
are.
GS: Those guys get no mercy from Amy. It’s their sullen ignorance
about the public space. Used to be you’d make your call in the privacy
of a phone booth, not in to the center of a gourmet restaurant. Yet
some people feel entitled to scream into their phone no matter where
they are. Not when Amy’s around. And that’s her message: “you don’t
have to take it.”

Editor’s note: For more information about the Amy Alkon event, please
go to www.nationalwritersseries.org.

 
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