Letters

Letters 11-28-2016

Trump should avoid self-dealing President-elect Donald Trump plans to turn over running of The Trump Organization to his children, who are also involved in the transition and will probably be informal advisers during his administration. This is not a “blind trust.” In this scenario Trump and family could make decisions based on what’s best for them rather than what’s best for the country...

Trump the change we need?  I have had a couple of weeks to digest the results of this election and reflect. There is no way the selection of Trump as POTUS could ever come close to being normal. It is not normal to have a president-elect settle a fraud case for millions a couple of months before the inauguration. It is not normal to have racists considered for cabinet posts. It is not normal for a president-elect tweet outrageous comments on his Twitter feed to respond to supposed insults at all hours of the early morning...

Health care system should benefit all It is no secret that the health insurance situation in our country is controversial. Some say the Affordable Care Act is “the most terrible thing that has happened to our country in years”; others are thrilled that, “for the first time in years I can get and afford health insurance.” Those who have not been closely involved in the medical field cannot be expected to understand how precarious the previous medical insurance structure was...

Christmas tradition needs change The Christmas light we need most is the divine, and to receive it we do not need electricity, probably only prayers and good deeds. But not everyone has this understanding, as we see in the energy waste that follows with the Christmas decorations...

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS 

A story in last week’s edition about parasailing businesses on East Grand Traverse Bay mistakenly described Grand Traverse Parasail as a business that is affiliated with the ParkShore Resort. It operates from a beach club two doors down from the resort. The story also should have noted that prior to the filing of a civil lawsuit in federal court by Saburi Boyer and Traverse Bay Parasail against Bryan Punturo and the ParkShore Resort, a similar lawsuit was dismissed from 13th Circuit Court in Traverse City upon a motion from the defendant’s attorney. Express regrets the error and omission.

A story in last week’s edition about The Fillmore restaurant in Manistee misstated Jacob Slonecki’s job at Arcadia Bluffs Golf Course. He was a cook. Express regrets the error.

Home · Articles · News · Books · Meet Amy Alkon‘s Better...
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Meet Amy Alkon‘s Better Half

Anne Stanton - February 8th, 2010
Meet Amy Alkon’s Better Half
By Anne Stanton
Thanks to Gregg Sutter, the Advice Goddess is coming to town on
February 11 to dish out her saucy advice on love at the City Opera
House, and to talk about her new book, I See Rude People.
Sutter is the researcher for Elmore Leonard, the reigning king of
crime writers. Sutter came to Traverse City last summer to accompany
Elmore and his crime-writing son, Peter Leonard, both of whom spoke
at a National Writers Series event, a new year-round book festival
that showcases nationally renowned writers.
When it was discovered Sutter is also the boyfriend of Amy Alkon, the
famed Advice Goddess, well that was interesting too. Alkon was asked
to kick off the 2010 National Writers Series season with her new
book. She enthusiastically agreed.
We reached Sutter at home in Los Angeles.

NE: I wanted to ask you what it’s like to be Amy’s boyfriend.
GS: As a rule, I don’t like talking about myself. But I don’t mind
talking about Amy. What do you think I’m going to say? It’s
wonderful to be her boyfriend. It’s always an adventure! One of her
friends called her “a force of nature” and it’s true. We’ve been
together a little over seven years and she still laughs at my jokes!
Seriously, she’s the kindest person I know. She makes everybody in
the room feel good. Did I mention that she’s beautiful?

NE: Do you and Amy live together?
GS: No. We like to miss each other. We both work at home and for most
of the time our home space and workspace are indistinguishable.
When we do get together, it’s always a happy occasion and we celebrate
our love for each other.

NE: Do you work with Amy?
GS: I shot the cover of her book, so that makes me her “official
photographer.” Normally, Amy will bounce ideas off me--things she’s
working on, she’s always trying to improve her craft. I do the same
with her. We’re constantly going back and forth on the phone, on
Skype, recently we added texting. Sometimes, when she’s having trouble
ending a column, she will call me in desperation and say,
“Say something funny!” It’s not that easy.

NE: So talk about this new book she just published, I See Rude People.

GS: The book evolved over many years. From her personal experiences,
Amy was able to bring together different aspects of everyday life she
finds rude and intolerable. She exposes rude people who try to make
the public space their private space. She speaks up when no one else
will. She stands up for herself and those around her. But I See Rude
People is not some self-righteous “manners manifesto.” Amy will be
the first to tell you that she is not setting herself apart as a
paragon of virtue. She’s just observing and reacting to the things
that go on in every day life. Rude People is as entertaining as it is
instructive.

NE: I sometimes think that loud talkers on cell phones--especially
those in a business meeting--want people to know how important they
are.
GS: Those guys get no mercy from Amy. It’s their sullen ignorance
about the public space. Used to be you’d make your call in the privacy
of a phone booth, not in to the center of a gourmet restaurant. Yet
some people feel entitled to scream into their phone no matter where
they are. Not when Amy’s around. And that’s her message: “you don’t
have to take it.”

Editor’s note: For more information about the Amy Alkon event, please
go to www.nationalwritersseries.org.

 
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