Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Meet Amy Alkon‘s Better...
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Meet Amy Alkon‘s Better Half

Anne Stanton - February 8th, 2010
Meet Amy Alkon’s Better Half
By Anne Stanton
Thanks to Gregg Sutter, the Advice Goddess is coming to town on
February 11 to dish out her saucy advice on love at the City Opera
House, and to talk about her new book, I See Rude People.
Sutter is the researcher for Elmore Leonard, the reigning king of
crime writers. Sutter came to Traverse City last summer to accompany
Elmore and his crime-writing son, Peter Leonard, both of whom spoke
at a National Writers Series event, a new year-round book festival
that showcases nationally renowned writers.
When it was discovered Sutter is also the boyfriend of Amy Alkon, the
famed Advice Goddess, well that was interesting too. Alkon was asked
to kick off the 2010 National Writers Series season with her new
book. She enthusiastically agreed.
We reached Sutter at home in Los Angeles.

NE: I wanted to ask you what it’s like to be Amy’s boyfriend.
GS: As a rule, I don’t like talking about myself. But I don’t mind
talking about Amy. What do you think I’m going to say? It’s
wonderful to be her boyfriend. It’s always an adventure! One of her
friends called her “a force of nature” and it’s true. We’ve been
together a little over seven years and she still laughs at my jokes!
Seriously, she’s the kindest person I know. She makes everybody in
the room feel good. Did I mention that she’s beautiful?

NE: Do you and Amy live together?
GS: No. We like to miss each other. We both work at home and for most
of the time our home space and workspace are indistinguishable.
When we do get together, it’s always a happy occasion and we celebrate
our love for each other.

NE: Do you work with Amy?
GS: I shot the cover of her book, so that makes me her “official
photographer.” Normally, Amy will bounce ideas off me--things she’s
working on, she’s always trying to improve her craft. I do the same
with her. We’re constantly going back and forth on the phone, on
Skype, recently we added texting. Sometimes, when she’s having trouble
ending a column, she will call me in desperation and say,
“Say something funny!” It’s not that easy.

NE: So talk about this new book she just published, I See Rude People.

GS: The book evolved over many years. From her personal experiences,
Amy was able to bring together different aspects of everyday life she
finds rude and intolerable. She exposes rude people who try to make
the public space their private space. She speaks up when no one else
will. She stands up for herself and those around her. But I See Rude
People is not some self-righteous “manners manifesto.” Amy will be
the first to tell you that she is not setting herself apart as a
paragon of virtue. She’s just observing and reacting to the things
that go on in every day life. Rude People is as entertaining as it is
instructive.

NE: I sometimes think that loud talkers on cell phones--especially
those in a business meeting--want people to know how important they
are.
GS: Those guys get no mercy from Amy. It’s their sullen ignorance
about the public space. Used to be you’d make your call in the privacy
of a phone booth, not in to the center of a gourmet restaurant. Yet
some people feel entitled to scream into their phone no matter where
they are. Not when Amy’s around. And that’s her message: “you don’t
have to take it.”

Editor’s note: For more information about the Amy Alkon event, please
go to www.nationalwritersseries.org.

 
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