Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · Reduce my taxes, cut your...
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Reduce my taxes, cut your benefits

Stephen Tuttle - February 22nd, 2010
Reduce my taxes, cut your benefits
The so-called Tea Party tax protestors are suddenly all the rage. They had
a little rally in Washington, D.C. back on September 12. Police estimated
the crowd at about 70,000 while rally organizers said more than a million
showed up.
Well, good for them. In fact, I say lets not just lower taxes, let’s do
away with them altogether. No federal or state income taxes, no sales
taxes, no property taxes. As renowned tax hater Grover Norquist once said,
let’s shrink government to the size where we can drown it in the bathtub.
There should be a small catch accompanying this policy shift. If you pay
no taxes you don’t get to avail yourself of any services or regulations
that result from the taxes the rest of us do pay.
We’ll start at home. You’ll have to figure out some way to get clean
drinking water and a way to dispose of your personal waste without
availing yourself of any services using tax dollars. You’ll probably have
to relocate, anyway – zoning is a government function paid for by taxes.
You won’t be able to live in any areas that are government zoned.
Then there’s that pesky car. You won’t be able to gas up at a typical
filling station because the gasoline your vehicle burns is regulated by
the government. Not that it particularly matters since you won’t be able
to register your vehicle, obtain a driver’s
license, or drive on any federal, state, county or city roads because they
are all paid for by taxes.
Food might be an issue, too. Despite the occasional highly publicized food
recall, billions of food items are safely consumed every day. Food safety
is a government function and there are those darned taxes, again. In
fact, plenty of food production is either regulated or subsidized by the
government and the accompanying taxes. So you can hunt and forage for your
sustenance. Just don’t do it on state or federal land. No doubt you can
find some nice tree bark and worms on your own property if you can figure
out how to own land without a deed. That’s a government function paid for
by taxes.
Employment might be troublesome. Nearly all businesses must meet some
kind of regulation so you’ll need to find a way around that. Maybe you
can work from your wilderness home. Just don’t use a telephone or
computer and no television for you rugged individualists; communications
are either regulated or licensed by the government and the taxes that
support it.
You’ll need some good luck, too. If your house catches fire or someone
tries to break in or if you or a family member has a health emergency or
accident, don’t call 9-1-1. Police and fire services are government
operations and we taxpayers would like to keep them for ourselves.
Doctors and hospitals are also licensed by the government and your taxes.
Just rub some dirt on that broken limb. You’ll be fine.
Trillions of tax dollars are collected and spent every year by various
levels of government. With that much money and that many programs there
is surely fraud, waste and duplication. It should all be rooted out and
eliminated. One can also argue there is too much government, too many
programs and too many regulations. There does seem to be some level of
government involved in virtually every aspect of our lives. Eliminating
the waste and excess could give us some welcome tax relief.
So, what should we cut? Which programs should be eliminated? Which
regulations are intrusive and unnecessary?
At the federal level the bulk of spending is for Medicare, Social Security
and national defense. At the state level it is public education, public
safety and either health care or transportation. We’ve already seen most
state and local governments hack away at their budgets as revenues crashed
during the current recession. Does that seem to be working out? Are we
better off with fewer teachers and more students in classrooms? Do we
need fewer police officers and fire fighters and ever increasing response
times for emergencies? How about less maintenance on our roads and less
plowing in the winter? Do we want fewer programs for both our children
and our parents?
That’s really the problem, isn’t it? It’s easy to yammer on about too
many taxes and too much regulation, unless the resulting cuts have a
direct impact on us. And there’s a good bet those taxes provide jobs or
lifelines for someone right down the street.
Every one of us benefits directly from the taxes we all pay and none of us
seems yet ready to forego the programs we need or want. We just want to
cut what benefits somebody else.



 
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