Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · Off with their heads
. . . .

Off with their heads

Robert Downes - February 22nd, 2010
Off with their heads...?
In 1649, King Charles I placed his head on a chopping block in London and
had it removed “in one clean stroke” of a broadaxe.
Charles had made the mistake of becoming too big of a pain in the neck for
his subjects (pun intended). In addition to demanding more revenues from
Parliament under the notion that he was divinely ordained, he also
inflicted immense suffering on his people by embarking on two civil wars;
not to mention a great deal of religious meddling at a time when that
resulted in rivers of blood.
In the hubris of kings, he thought of himself as being “too big to be
allowed to fail.”
But during the second English Civil War, King Charles was captured and
tried for high treason. His execution sent a bad case of the shivvers
through the royalty of Europe; presumably they felt a curious itch around
their own collars.
Maybe it’s a stretch, but couldn’t this lesson from history be instructive
in our own troubles with the bankers who play the role of kings on Wall
Street?
Last week, President Obama made the point that 2008’s bailout of $787
billion for our biggest banks was necessary because it kept our country
from being plunged into another Great Depression. Who knows how many
people would be unemployed now if the government hadn’t taken that
politically unpopular step.
As it is, the disaster visited upon us by the irresponsible lending
practices of America’s biggest banks has been cited as being responsible
for the loss of 8.4 million jobs.
Perhaps that‘s not “high treason,” but it seems close enough for Congress
to start fetching some kind of axe.
President Obama’s remarks came on the heels of a bombshell story in the
New York Times which revealed that Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan Chase and
other banks had concealed their reckless loans to Greece, allowing that
rickety, antique country to borrow far beyond its means with no
conceivable way of paying back investors.
Now, those bad deals are coming back to haunt America because they’ve
undermined Europe’s currency: the euro. When the value of the euro goes
down, it raises the value of the dollar, which means that U.S. products
cost more overseas. This means that the actions of Wall Street bankers
have once again created a situation where American jobs are lost, and just
when a recovery seems at hand. And that undermines the entire country,
with fewer tax dollars to pay for programs such as education and Social
Security.
As a result of hiding its borrowing from investors and regulators, Greece
now owes $300 billion. Waiting in the wings are similar disasters in
Portugal, Ireland and Spain. And again, the outcome will mean another
slam at America’s unemployed.
This is not to mention all of the billions lost in the 401k retirement
plans of American workers whose investments are continually jerked around
by the irresponsible actions of firms such as Goldman Sachs.
When is someone in Congress going to step up to the plate and say “Off
with their heads!” for the royalty of Wall Street who seem to feel they
have the divine right to wreak endless harm on America?
Not in a literal sense (satisfying though that might be), but it seems
high time to consider breaking these banks up the way that the monopoly of
“Ma Bell” AT&T was splintered in 1984. Or at least, tax these bandits and
their bonuses until they‘ve got nothing left but their underwear.
The banks argued that they were literally “too big to be allowed to fail”
when they sent one-third of the world’s economic value up in smoke. But
the latest betrayal in Europe makes you wonder if they are “too big to be
allowed to exist.”
Northern Michigan offers a model for a bank that succeeded by doing things
by the book: Northwestern Bank, which has branches in 18 communities,
didn’t need any bail-out funds because they resisted the urge to make
shaky loans and dubious mortgages at a time when that was all the rage.
They held to the principles of good business practices and today are
widely considered to be the most solvent and successful bank in Northern
Michigan.
We need to demand that same integrity from the largest banks and
investment firms in America because jobs and retirement funds are on the
line here -- not to mention the ramifications for Social Security,
Medicare, education and social programs which will go begging as a result
of this continuing disaster.
***
Footnote: Getting back to good King Charles... Oliver Cromwell, who
became dictator of England after the king’s death, was so kind as to let
relatives sew Charles’ head back on his body so that he could be
presentable for his funeral. Perhaps a similar courtesy could be extended
to the kings of Wall Street.

 
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