Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Ready to make your home a...
. . . .

Ready to make your home a little greener?

Anne Stanton - February 22nd, 2010
Ready to Make Your Home a Little greener?
The government has made it very affordable
By Anne Stanton
 After getting a $300 bill from DTE Energy for two months in a row, I
decided to toughen up. I turned the thermostat down from 70 degrees to a
bracing 62 degrees.
The next day, my 17-year-old son came downstairs and was a little shocked
to see his breath. “Brrrr! Mom! What happened to the heat?!” I announced
our new energy policy: bundle up or freeze.
But the change was too drastic. Everyone caught colds. Our savings went
toward Kleenex, doctor appointments, and antibiotics for sinus infections.
I turned the thermostat up to 66 and decided on a different approach.
Enter Ric Evans, a nationally certified RESNET/BPI energy auditor, who
agreed to do an audit of our 47-year-old home.
Evans,  the personable and very tall owner of Paradigm Energy Services,
teaches energy savings to the construction trade and homeowners alike at
Northwestern Michigan College. From his Charlevoix based office he
performs energy audits all across Northern Michigan.
Evans brought me some bad news and good news. The bad news was my house is
profoundly under-insulated and leaky. He made an audible gasp as he shone
his flashlight into our attic. “Whoa!  Only three-inches of insulation!”
There should be a minimum of eight inches, preferably 18. He made a
similar gasp when shining his light on the rim and band joist—the 8-inch
wooden band encircling the basement foundation upon which the house sits.
There was no insulation there, and apparently it’s a notorious major heat
loss area. I asked for a ballpark estimate to insulate and seal. He
guessed about $3,000. It was my turn to gasp.
REIMBURSEMENT
So now the good news. We wouldn’t need money in the bank to make the
necessary upgrades.
First, Evans’ energy audit was going to be almost free, and not just
because I was writing this article. Cherryland Electric Cooperative and
DTE Energy will reimburse customers for all or most of the energy audits
cost in exchange for proof of actually getting some work done. (Traverse
City Light and Power offers a $10 energy audit to customers, but it’s less
comprehensive - no blower door test or infrared scan.)
Additionally,  DTE Energy has the best rebates with up to $2,100 available
for an audit, new furnace, and weatherization improvements. As with most
electrical providers, Cherryland Rural Electric has a much more modest
rebate program, but offers a free audit for the first 50 people who sign
up for a pilot program.
I thought, rebates are fine, but who has thousands of dollars in upfront
cash—especially now—to pay for audits and improvements? More good news. If
you are a Cherryland Electric customer, it’s possible to get a
low-interest loan for energy improvements and a free energy audit through
a pilot program with MichiganSaves.org - a program that aims to go
statewide soon.  DTE Energy does not offer financing, but you can go to
Members Credit Union for an energy efficiency improvement loan (and you
don’t have to be a credit union member). 
And poor to low-middle income homeowners are eligible for an average of
$6,500 in energy saving improvements thanks to the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act, locally available through the Northwest Michigan
Community Action Agency.
“Obama almost quintupled the money in the weatherization program through
his ARRA stimulus package, but I tell people they better take advantage of
it fast before the money runs out. And that goes for the various utility
rebate programs, too.” Evans said.

BIGGEST BANG
Evans will happily guide you toward the various programs—and there are
plenty out there. His final report specifies exactly how the energy
upgrades should be made and where to get the biggest bang for your buck.
Bottom line, it’s hard to go wrong—energy efficiency adds comfort and
saves money.
Looking at my home through Evans’ eyes proved to be a humbling experience.
Why had I never noticed the one-foot ice dam along the back roofline, or
the frigid air blowing through my can lights in the wall, fluttering a
maze of cobwebs?  Speaking of cobwebs, that’s nature’s sign of a leaky
light fixture—the spiders find the insects easy pickings as they are blown
to and fro.
Some fixes were unbelievably easy. Both my backdoors were partially
opened. As Evans gave them an extra push, I heard a satisfying
whoomph-click.  He closed the flue on my fireplace. A $20 blanket on my
water heater would pay for itself within months.  A solar hot water heater
is the “biggest no-brainer,” even in Northern Michigan, he said.
The upstairs windows were letting in vast amounts of cold air. He
suggested caulking around the edges of the trim and weather stripping
where the bottom of the window meets the frame. New windows usually don’t
make financial sense. He pointed out gaps in my storm windows; even a
1/8-inch gap causes intense leakage. Plastic on the windows can make a big
difference, and is considerably cheaper than new windows.
More suggestions: Keep the blinds down when we don’t need the sunshine. A
humidifier makes the home seem more comfortable, and a fan will circulate
the air. The best insulation choice is cellulose or spray foam, which
insulates and seals.
I learned we have a good furnace, but a lot of warm air was escaping
through part of a pipe thanks to dried out and sagging duct tape. “The
irony of duct tape is it’s useless for ducts,” he said. Use mastic
instead.

GET BUSY
I’m anxious to see Evans’ report and find out what to do next. He said a
lot of people love to talk about saving energy, but few actually do
anything. So how’s this for inspiration? Thirty to 40 percent of all
energy used in this country goes to heating and powering buildings.
“If enough of us took action, we wouldn’t need any new power plants. We
really wouldn’t. This is almost free energy,” he said.

To reach Ric Evans, call 231-237-9293. Other energy auditors include
Jeremy Truog at 922-5907,  Max Strickland at 632-0930, and Burkholder
Construction. If you live out of the area, check out www.resnet.us and
www.bpi.org. Burkholder Construction and Brown Lumber can do the follow-up
work.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close