Letters

Letters 02-01-2016

Real Contamination In 1968, Chicago (its Mayor Richard Daley in particular) felt menaced by anti-war protesters (Abbie Hoffman in particular) threatening to put the hallucinogenic LSD into Chicago’s water supply. In reaction to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., we reacted vigorously to a perceived threat of chemical or biological terrorist attacks on our water supply. A religious cult contaminating a city water tank with salmonella in Oregon, sickening about 700, was the only such attack in our country until now. The water supply of Flint, Mich., was attacked and contaminated, not by terrorists or protesters, but by our own government...

Why The Muslim Debate? I was passing through your fine town last week and picked up a couple copies of Northern Express. There I noted a discourse concerning the Muslim situation in Dearborn. It is interesting to note that I see similar conversations in newspapers and blogs throughout the country and, in fact, throughout the world...

Kachadurian Has It All Wrong Thank you for continuing to publish Thomas Kachadurian’s bigoted editorials. If not for this publication, I wouldn’t know that such people lived in my sweet northern Michigan...

Over The Line I felt Sarah Palin crossed the line when she indicated our president did not care about those like her son who came home wounded. No one challenges her on these remarks; to me it is shameful...

Flints’ Man-made Disaster Governor Snyder’s Financial Emergency Manager Law has created a State of Emergency in Flint. In 2011, newly elected Governor Snyder signed Public Act 4, giving him the freedom to take over any city government his office found financially bankrupt, with power to override any decision of elected city officials. This law showed his primary motive — money before people. In November 2012, the People of Michigan voted down his Financial Emergency Manager Law, as they resented losing control of their cities. In December 2012, he showed his contempt for the people’s vote and signed a revised version, one that did not give power back to the people...

Defending the AR15 And Gun Rights I was amazed to read David Downer’s recent letter. He admits he is a gun owner but he expresses his ignorance of what an “assault rifle” really is, and thereby spreads the antigun position that an AR15 is an assault rifle...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Small planet, big hearts
. . . .

Small planet, big hearts

Erin Crowell - March 1st, 2010
Small planet, Big Hearts
By Erin Crowell
In Northern Michigan, you get kudos for shopping local – and are
encouraged to do so. After all, by supporting local businesses, you
support your neighbors, community and, in turn, yourself. Everybody
wins.
So what about imports? Is it wrong to purchase products from Vietnam,
Hong Kong and the Philippines? Well, it all depends on where you buy
them.
Small Planet of Traverse City is a locally-owned retail shop that
carries imported goods from over 50 countries – all sweatshop-free and
fairly traded, meaning the producers of that good have been paid a
fair wage.
Tucked behind the City Opera House in a small, narrow building off a
one-way alley, Small Planet is proudly owned and operated by Vicki and
Art Kinney, with the help of son Caleb and daughter Daisy.

A FAIR START
Four years ago, Vicki got onboard when a friend presented the idea of
a fair trade shop.
“I was very interested when she talked about the idea,” says Kinney.
“A trip to India in college sparked my interest – just seeing an
impact of when people were provided an opportunity to start a little
business, what impact it had on their families. For me, the idea of
fair trade started 20 years ago.”
The two friends started the business together, but in November 2007,
Kinney was offered to purchase the business and take it on herself –
which she did, with the help of Art.
“He kind of got—I don’t want to say ‘got drug into it,’” Vicki laughs,
“but he got onboard. Art is totally my right-hand-man, QuickBooks kind
of guy.”

FAIR TRADE, LOCAL AND ABROAD
Small Planet carries products from all over the world including:
natural fiber (and sometimes organic) clothing; pure ingredient body
care products, bags, ceramics and linens; books on peace, social
injustice and environmental sustainability; housewares, incense, made
with natural resins and essential oils; pet items, peace flags and
food, including coffee, tea, chocolate and olive oil.
“Sometimes it’s easier import-wise to get something from a certain
region,” says Kinney. “We get a lot of clothing and jewelry from India
and that region in general… Southeast Asia, Bangladesh, Vietnam…we get
quite a bit. We get nice textiles from Guatemala; and a lot of our
instruments and baskets come from West Africa. Those are probably some
of our bigger sellers.”
Small Planet also carries music, both world and local.
“We do support local artists. We have a lot of local music and some
clothes by a local clothing designer,” says Kinney. “We’re a local
family. We live a mile away from the shop and ride our bikes. So we
are very involved in the community. We shop at local stores here and
support whatever we can locally. So it all just keeps getting
circulated.
“People get concerned about the economy in the U.S. and shopping at an
import store; but then I point out to people if they go to Wal-Mart—or
wherever they mostly shop—if they look at the labels, most of what
they buy is imported anyway. So this is an assurance that the people
who made it are being paid fairly.”

LOTS OF RESEARCH
Before Kinney finalizes a fair trade deal, she does her share of research.
“I start by going and looking at members of the Fair trade
Organization and read their stories and see who stands out to me.
There are a lot of people importing in the fair trade world.
“I want to be able to ask those questions of the people I’m buying
from and how and what they’re putting back into their own community.”
When it comes to pay, Kinney says the process is personal.
“Because it’s so culturally different from region to region, it has to
be very personalized. It’s really based on respect. If I was someone
who wanted to import something, I would go and meet with a cooperative
of, let’s say weavers, and they would talk and negotiate that process
of what their costs are, what they need to make. So it’s a real direct
relationship-based process. Part of fair trade, too, is that the goal
is to create sustainable income, so it’s not just a fly-by-night kind
of thing.”
Does Kinney believe Northern Michigan has fully embraced the idea of
fair trade or could we be doing more?
“Both,” she says. “I think that once people hear about it, they’re
very eager to embrace it. It’s still just not very mainstream in this
part of the country. Some people come in during the summer saying, ‘Oh
this looks like it could be in California,’ you know? Where people get
information more quickly than we do.
“Even though we’re not a nonprofit, I’m looking at having a community
outreach program. Getting out and talking with people about fair trade
and what it is. We want to be sustainable so we can educate people;
and it’s just an easy way to do something good.”

Small Planet is located at 113 East State Street, behind Union Street
Station and the City Opera House, in Traverse City. Their winter hours
are Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Thursday; and
closed on Sunday. Call 929-4228 or visit them online at
SmallPlanetFairTrade.com.

 
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