Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Small planet, big hearts
. . . .

Small planet, big hearts

Erin Crowell - March 1st, 2010
Small planet, Big Hearts
By Erin Crowell
In Northern Michigan, you get kudos for shopping local – and are
encouraged to do so. After all, by supporting local businesses, you
support your neighbors, community and, in turn, yourself. Everybody
wins.
So what about imports? Is it wrong to purchase products from Vietnam,
Hong Kong and the Philippines? Well, it all depends on where you buy
them.
Small Planet of Traverse City is a locally-owned retail shop that
carries imported goods from over 50 countries – all sweatshop-free and
fairly traded, meaning the producers of that good have been paid a
fair wage.
Tucked behind the City Opera House in a small, narrow building off a
one-way alley, Small Planet is proudly owned and operated by Vicki and
Art Kinney, with the help of son Caleb and daughter Daisy.

A FAIR START
Four years ago, Vicki got onboard when a friend presented the idea of
a fair trade shop.
“I was very interested when she talked about the idea,” says Kinney.
“A trip to India in college sparked my interest – just seeing an
impact of when people were provided an opportunity to start a little
business, what impact it had on their families. For me, the idea of
fair trade started 20 years ago.”
The two friends started the business together, but in November 2007,
Kinney was offered to purchase the business and take it on herself –
which she did, with the help of Art.
“He kind of got—I don’t want to say ‘got drug into it,’” Vicki laughs,
“but he got onboard. Art is totally my right-hand-man, QuickBooks kind
of guy.”

FAIR TRADE, LOCAL AND ABROAD
Small Planet carries products from all over the world including:
natural fiber (and sometimes organic) clothing; pure ingredient body
care products, bags, ceramics and linens; books on peace, social
injustice and environmental sustainability; housewares, incense, made
with natural resins and essential oils; pet items, peace flags and
food, including coffee, tea, chocolate and olive oil.
“Sometimes it’s easier import-wise to get something from a certain
region,” says Kinney. “We get a lot of clothing and jewelry from India
and that region in general… Southeast Asia, Bangladesh, Vietnam…we get
quite a bit. We get nice textiles from Guatemala; and a lot of our
instruments and baskets come from West Africa. Those are probably some
of our bigger sellers.”
Small Planet also carries music, both world and local.
“We do support local artists. We have a lot of local music and some
clothes by a local clothing designer,” says Kinney. “We’re a local
family. We live a mile away from the shop and ride our bikes. So we
are very involved in the community. We shop at local stores here and
support whatever we can locally. So it all just keeps getting
circulated.
“People get concerned about the economy in the U.S. and shopping at an
import store; but then I point out to people if they go to Wal-Mart—or
wherever they mostly shop—if they look at the labels, most of what
they buy is imported anyway. So this is an assurance that the people
who made it are being paid fairly.”

LOTS OF RESEARCH
Before Kinney finalizes a fair trade deal, she does her share of research.
“I start by going and looking at members of the Fair trade
Organization and read their stories and see who stands out to me.
There are a lot of people importing in the fair trade world.
“I want to be able to ask those questions of the people I’m buying
from and how and what they’re putting back into their own community.”
When it comes to pay, Kinney says the process is personal.
“Because it’s so culturally different from region to region, it has to
be very personalized. It’s really based on respect. If I was someone
who wanted to import something, I would go and meet with a cooperative
of, let’s say weavers, and they would talk and negotiate that process
of what their costs are, what they need to make. So it’s a real direct
relationship-based process. Part of fair trade, too, is that the goal
is to create sustainable income, so it’s not just a fly-by-night kind
of thing.”
Does Kinney believe Northern Michigan has fully embraced the idea of
fair trade or could we be doing more?
“Both,” she says. “I think that once people hear about it, they’re
very eager to embrace it. It’s still just not very mainstream in this
part of the country. Some people come in during the summer saying, ‘Oh
this looks like it could be in California,’ you know? Where people get
information more quickly than we do.
“Even though we’re not a nonprofit, I’m looking at having a community
outreach program. Getting out and talking with people about fair trade
and what it is. We want to be sustainable so we can educate people;
and it’s just an easy way to do something good.”

Small Planet is located at 113 East State Street, behind Union Street
Station and the City Opera House, in Traverse City. Their winter hours
are Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Thursday; and
closed on Sunday. Call 929-4228 or visit them online at
SmallPlanetFairTrade.com.

 
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