Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Small planet, big hearts
. . . .

Small planet, big hearts

Erin Crowell - March 1st, 2010
Small planet, Big Hearts
By Erin Crowell
In Northern Michigan, you get kudos for shopping local – and are
encouraged to do so. After all, by supporting local businesses, you
support your neighbors, community and, in turn, yourself. Everybody
wins.
So what about imports? Is it wrong to purchase products from Vietnam,
Hong Kong and the Philippines? Well, it all depends on where you buy
them.
Small Planet of Traverse City is a locally-owned retail shop that
carries imported goods from over 50 countries – all sweatshop-free and
fairly traded, meaning the producers of that good have been paid a
fair wage.
Tucked behind the City Opera House in a small, narrow building off a
one-way alley, Small Planet is proudly owned and operated by Vicki and
Art Kinney, with the help of son Caleb and daughter Daisy.

A FAIR START
Four years ago, Vicki got onboard when a friend presented the idea of
a fair trade shop.
“I was very interested when she talked about the idea,” says Kinney.
“A trip to India in college sparked my interest – just seeing an
impact of when people were provided an opportunity to start a little
business, what impact it had on their families. For me, the idea of
fair trade started 20 years ago.”
The two friends started the business together, but in November 2007,
Kinney was offered to purchase the business and take it on herself –
which she did, with the help of Art.
“He kind of got—I don’t want to say ‘got drug into it,’” Vicki laughs,
“but he got onboard. Art is totally my right-hand-man, QuickBooks kind
of guy.”

FAIR TRADE, LOCAL AND ABROAD
Small Planet carries products from all over the world including:
natural fiber (and sometimes organic) clothing; pure ingredient body
care products, bags, ceramics and linens; books on peace, social
injustice and environmental sustainability; housewares, incense, made
with natural resins and essential oils; pet items, peace flags and
food, including coffee, tea, chocolate and olive oil.
“Sometimes it’s easier import-wise to get something from a certain
region,” says Kinney. “We get a lot of clothing and jewelry from India
and that region in general… Southeast Asia, Bangladesh, Vietnam…we get
quite a bit. We get nice textiles from Guatemala; and a lot of our
instruments and baskets come from West Africa. Those are probably some
of our bigger sellers.”
Small Planet also carries music, both world and local.
“We do support local artists. We have a lot of local music and some
clothes by a local clothing designer,” says Kinney. “We’re a local
family. We live a mile away from the shop and ride our bikes. So we
are very involved in the community. We shop at local stores here and
support whatever we can locally. So it all just keeps getting
circulated.
“People get concerned about the economy in the U.S. and shopping at an
import store; but then I point out to people if they go to Wal-Mart—or
wherever they mostly shop—if they look at the labels, most of what
they buy is imported anyway. So this is an assurance that the people
who made it are being paid fairly.”

LOTS OF RESEARCH
Before Kinney finalizes a fair trade deal, she does her share of research.
“I start by going and looking at members of the Fair trade
Organization and read their stories and see who stands out to me.
There are a lot of people importing in the fair trade world.
“I want to be able to ask those questions of the people I’m buying
from and how and what they’re putting back into their own community.”
When it comes to pay, Kinney says the process is personal.
“Because it’s so culturally different from region to region, it has to
be very personalized. It’s really based on respect. If I was someone
who wanted to import something, I would go and meet with a cooperative
of, let’s say weavers, and they would talk and negotiate that process
of what their costs are, what they need to make. So it’s a real direct
relationship-based process. Part of fair trade, too, is that the goal
is to create sustainable income, so it’s not just a fly-by-night kind
of thing.”
Does Kinney believe Northern Michigan has fully embraced the idea of
fair trade or could we be doing more?
“Both,” she says. “I think that once people hear about it, they’re
very eager to embrace it. It’s still just not very mainstream in this
part of the country. Some people come in during the summer saying, ‘Oh
this looks like it could be in California,’ you know? Where people get
information more quickly than we do.
“Even though we’re not a nonprofit, I’m looking at having a community
outreach program. Getting out and talking with people about fair trade
and what it is. We want to be sustainable so we can educate people;
and it’s just an easy way to do something good.”

Small Planet is located at 113 East State Street, behind Union Street
Station and the City Opera House, in Traverse City. Their winter hours
are Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Thursday; and
closed on Sunday. Call 929-4228 or visit them online at
SmallPlanetFairTrade.com.

 
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