Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Man in black/ Shawn Baker
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Man in black/ Shawn Baker

Kristi Kates - June 7th, 2010
Man in Black :Shawn Barker Gets Rhythm as Johnny Cash
By Kristi Kates
“I’ve always been a Johnny Cash fan, as were my dad and grandpa,” musician Shawn Barker says of his “Man in Black” tribute show. “Johnny Cash grew up in the same area of Arkansas as my dad’s family. Growing up, I remember visiting my dad’s side of the family and hearing Johnny being played a lot on the radio and record player; I love Johnny’s voice, and the way his songs tell a story. I also love the way he always let the music speak for itself.”
Barker, who was born and raised in St. Louis and still lives there today when he’s not traveling, began his interest with music in school, with his first performance experience as a line drummer with the school band in 8th grade. In high school, he sang with local cover bands and learned the guitar; later, his Elvis-like good looks drew him into performing at Elvis tribute shows.
“I really loved his music, and thought he was so cool, so it fit for me,” Barker says.
That ‘good fit’ led to Barker traveling around the U.S. for a few years, performing at Elvis tribute shows, and even winning the Elvis tribute contest at the Gibson Showcase in Nashville. Then, things took an even more interesting turn.

ELVIS TO CASH
“About six years ago, a casting director for the musical “The Million Dollar Quartet” (a stage play built around an impromptu jam session between Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Carl Perkins) heard about me and asked if I wanted to audition for the part of Elvis,” Barker explains, “he also suggested that I audition for the Johnny Cash part. I worked on the Cash character, and went to Hollywood to audition.... and I was cast as Johnny Cash.”
Barker would spend the next four months traveling back and forth to Hollywood, doing script readings and working on the Cash part for his role in the musical. During that same time period, the ambitious singer kept doing his Elvis shows.
One fateful January night in a chilly northern Wisconsin venue, Barker and his touring mates all got terrible colds, with no one being able to sing. Barker offered to perform as Johnny Cash instead of Elvis (“because I thought I could sing the lower notes,” he explains.) The crowd went crazy at Barker’s Cash tribute, and the opportunities changed yet again for the singer.
“My now-manager recorded my segment of the show (as Cash) and put a demo together to upload to his website,” Barker explains, “incredibly, we immediately had 10 bookings to do the Cash tribute, including the Trump Casino in Atlantic City. We sat down and wrote the script, and never looked back.”
Although this meant that Barker had to withdraw from his Broadway part in “The Million Dollar Quartet” - which has gone on to successful runs in Chicago and New York - the Cash part seems to suit him, and he’s flourished in it.
“I don’t really consider myself a Johnny Cash tribute artist, although that’s what I’ve been called,” Barker says, “I look at myself now as more of a singer and actor playing a role.”

FROZEN IN TIME
Barker’s performance as Johnny Cash today takes the audience back to “seeing” what Johnny Cash’s shows were like back in the early ‘60s, and offer glimpses into other facets of the Man in Black’s career, as well.
“The show really is a frozen moment in time,” Barker explains, “however, we also cover all aspects of Johnny’s career, from the early Sun Records days through his later work with Rick Rubin. I stay in the Cash character for most of the show, telling stories about the music and about his life.”
Barker performs with a full four-piece band and a backup singer, Jilla Webb, who sings harmony and covers the vocals parts of June Carter for several duets, although Barker stresses that she wasn’t “cast” as June Carter.
“Everyone dresses in black,” he continues, “and I wear the signature black suits that Johnny wore.”
For Barker, though, this isn’t merely a way to make a quick buck because of his visual resemblance and vocal abilities. Barker emphasizes that he is a Johnny Cash fan, and has a huge amount of respect for what Cash did for music.
“The show is definitely done in honor of Johnny Cash’s music and career,” he says, “If there wasn’t as big a demand, I wouldn’t be touring each year doing the show; but I would definitely still have some of Johnny’s music in any performance that I was doing.”

CHALLENGES AND REWARDS
One of the best things that’s happened to him during this experience, Barker says, was performance-based, as well; he was able to actually work with one of the members of Johnny Cash’s band.
“A couple of years ago, I was asked by Jonathan Holiff, the son of Johnny’s manager Saul Holiff, to perform with W.S. ‘Fluke’ Holland (Johnny Cash’s drummer from 1960 through the ‘90s) at a special 40th anniversary concert at Folsom Prison,” Barker explains, “unfortunately, the show was cancelled at the last minute, but we were still able to arrange to have W.S. join our show in Las Vegas; he was a great guy, and we are still friends today.”
And one of the most challenging?
“I think everything about it is difficult,” Barker ponders, “I have worked very hard on my voice, and mannerisms. I work on it every day. It’s always a work in progress. Johnny was one of a kind, and I don’t think I will ever be close to what he really was. His voice, stage presence and the way he delivered a song was so unique. We work very hard to be as close to the original as we can, and I believe we are very good at it, but no one will be able to duplicate what he did. I love everything about this show, though - the band, the music, the people, being on stage, all of it.”
“Being on the road for six years is hard work, but rewarding,” he smiles, “and at the end of the night, there is nothing I would rather be doing.”

The Man in Black Show: A Tribute to Johnny Cash starring Shawn Barker, will take place at Traverse City’s Ground Zero on Friday, June 11. It will be Barker’s first Traverse City appearance. Doors open at 7 p.m., show begins at 8 p.m.; advance tix are $10 plus handling charges. Find out more and purchase tickets at www.groundzeroonline.com

 
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