Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · The River Wild
. . . .

The River Wild

Mike Terrell - July 12th, 2010
The River Wild: The Sturgeon runs fast & feisty
By Mike Terrell
With a whoop and shout, one-by-one, six paddlers took turns easing
over a two-foot drop on the Sturgeon River.  It was an old dam site
that had been removed years ago.  Sizeable standing waves, which you
had to negotiate, waited at the bottom of the drop.
This occurs within the first half-hour down the river after launching
from Lumbermen’s Park in downtown Wolverine.  A fast, feisty river,
the Sturgeon quickly establishes its character with the dam drop.
The Sturgeon is one of the fastest – if not the fastest – flowing
streams in the Lower Peninsula. Lots of tight bends with fallen trees
and sweepers, occasional narrow passages between bushel-basket-sized
boulders, submerged trees and fast riffles with standing waves, make
it one of the most challenging paddles in Northern Michigan.  It drops
on the average 14 feet per mile from beginning to end as it flows
north to Burt Lake.  It’s one of the few north-flowing rivers in the
state.
It’s more than a handful for novice paddlers.  You need at least basic
paddling skills to negotiate the many hazards you encounter.  The
liveries that service the river clear a path through downed trees, but
the swift current tries to sweep you into the obstacles and leaves you
precious little time to decide on a course.

EXPERIENCE COUNTS
Jerry Dennis, in his book, “Canoeing Michigan Rivers,” says, “The
swift current combined with tight turns, leaning trees and occasional
obstructions make it a river not recommended for absolute beginners.”
That doesn’t mean the river doesn’t draw its share of beginning
paddlers, according to Jon Henley, owner of Henley’s Canoe and Kayak
Livery, located in Wolverine.
“It’s a popular river, especially on hot summer weekends, and we get
our share of people that probably shouldn’t be paddling that want to
do it anyway.  They want to have fun and don’t mind getting wet.  We
warn them about the hazards, but still they want to go.”
The stretch of river south of Wolverine, from Trowbridge Road access
north to the village park, is an easier section of river to paddle,
according to Henley.
“That’s a nice stretch of river below Wolverine, and it isn’t as hard
or fast as the river north of town.  It’s about a two-hour trip back
to the livery.  That’s where I try to send the real beginners.”
 Henley does routine cleanups along the river, because the frequent
dumping of canoes and kayaks during a downstream trip can leave refuse
strewn along river banks and stuck in streamers.
“It’s part of the cost of doing business,” he laughed.  “I moved up
here with my family years ago because of the clean environment.  I
want to make sure it stays that way.  This is one of the most
beautiful rivers that I’ve seen. It’s so pristine.”

WINDING WATERWAY
The Sturgeon, also considered a premier trout stream, is as beautiful
as it is challenging.  But, sometimes it’s hard to see the beauty,
because you have to pay such close attention to the river and your
course.  It remains about 30 to 50 feet wide through most of the river
north of Wolverine.  Quick, narrow passages around and through
obstacles can be thrown at you on a moments notice as you round a bend
in the river.  It keeps it fun and exciting.
The river alternates winding through dark cedar forests and bright,
open meadows with waving grasses and wildflowers.  Much of the river
meanders through state forest.  There are few obtrusive cottages along
the way until you get near the town of Indian River.  The spring-fed
river, whose headwaters begin near Gaylord, is a little over 40 miles
in length, but only the last 16 or so miles – from Trowbridge Road
where it crosses below I-75 to Burt Lake – are considered navigable.
Our small group of Traverse Area Paddle Club paddlers did an 11-mile
section north from the township park to the Fisher Woods Road access
site.  It took us a little over four hours with a stop for lunch along
the river.  It was a fun day spent on a feisty little river that likes
to give as much as it takes.
 Weekends can be busy with tubers, especially from the White Road
Bridge access north to Indian River.  One of our group said they had
encountered as many as 75 tubes through this two-mile stretch a few
summers ago.  It was a group an Indian River outfitter had put into
the river; talk about a log – er, tube – jam.
Henley’s will spot your vehicle if you have your own watercraft.  For
more information on canoe and kayak rental rates and trips, call
231-525-9994 or log onto www.henleysrentals.com.  Big Bear Adventures,
located in Indian River, is another outfitter servicing the Sturgeon
River.  They can be reached at 231-238-8181 or by logging onto
www.bigbearadventures.com.

If you are looking for like-minded people that love to do river
floats, the Traverse Area Paddle Club, on average, will have over 150
trips scheduled on area rivers and lakes throughout the paddling
months of April through October.  Check them out at
www.traverseareapaddleclub.org.  Membership is only $15 individual or
$25 for a family.
 
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