Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Features · The River Wild
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The River Wild

Mike Terrell - July 12th, 2010
The River Wild: The Sturgeon runs fast & feisty
By Mike Terrell
With a whoop and shout, one-by-one, six paddlers took turns easing
over a two-foot drop on the Sturgeon River.  It was an old dam site
that had been removed years ago.  Sizeable standing waves, which you
had to negotiate, waited at the bottom of the drop.
This occurs within the first half-hour down the river after launching
from Lumbermen’s Park in downtown Wolverine.  A fast, feisty river,
the Sturgeon quickly establishes its character with the dam drop.
The Sturgeon is one of the fastest – if not the fastest – flowing
streams in the Lower Peninsula. Lots of tight bends with fallen trees
and sweepers, occasional narrow passages between bushel-basket-sized
boulders, submerged trees and fast riffles with standing waves, make
it one of the most challenging paddles in Northern Michigan.  It drops
on the average 14 feet per mile from beginning to end as it flows
north to Burt Lake.  It’s one of the few north-flowing rivers in the
It’s more than a handful for novice paddlers.  You need at least basic
paddling skills to negotiate the many hazards you encounter.  The
liveries that service the river clear a path through downed trees, but
the swift current tries to sweep you into the obstacles and leaves you
precious little time to decide on a course.

Jerry Dennis, in his book, “Canoeing Michigan Rivers,” says, “The
swift current combined with tight turns, leaning trees and occasional
obstructions make it a river not recommended for absolute beginners.”
That doesn’t mean the river doesn’t draw its share of beginning
paddlers, according to Jon Henley, owner of Henley’s Canoe and Kayak
Livery, located in Wolverine.
“It’s a popular river, especially on hot summer weekends, and we get
our share of people that probably shouldn’t be paddling that want to
do it anyway.  They want to have fun and don’t mind getting wet.  We
warn them about the hazards, but still they want to go.”
The stretch of river south of Wolverine, from Trowbridge Road access
north to the village park, is an easier section of river to paddle,
according to Henley.
“That’s a nice stretch of river below Wolverine, and it isn’t as hard
or fast as the river north of town.  It’s about a two-hour trip back
to the livery.  That’s where I try to send the real beginners.”
 Henley does routine cleanups along the river, because the frequent
dumping of canoes and kayaks during a downstream trip can leave refuse
strewn along river banks and stuck in streamers.
“It’s part of the cost of doing business,” he laughed.  “I moved up
here with my family years ago because of the clean environment.  I
want to make sure it stays that way.  This is one of the most
beautiful rivers that I’ve seen. It’s so pristine.”

The Sturgeon, also considered a premier trout stream, is as beautiful
as it is challenging.  But, sometimes it’s hard to see the beauty,
because you have to pay such close attention to the river and your
course.  It remains about 30 to 50 feet wide through most of the river
north of Wolverine.  Quick, narrow passages around and through
obstacles can be thrown at you on a moments notice as you round a bend
in the river.  It keeps it fun and exciting.
The river alternates winding through dark cedar forests and bright,
open meadows with waving grasses and wildflowers.  Much of the river
meanders through state forest.  There are few obtrusive cottages along
the way until you get near the town of Indian River.  The spring-fed
river, whose headwaters begin near Gaylord, is a little over 40 miles
in length, but only the last 16 or so miles – from Trowbridge Road
where it crosses below I-75 to Burt Lake – are considered navigable.
Our small group of Traverse Area Paddle Club paddlers did an 11-mile
section north from the township park to the Fisher Woods Road access
site.  It took us a little over four hours with a stop for lunch along
the river.  It was a fun day spent on a feisty little river that likes
to give as much as it takes.
 Weekends can be busy with tubers, especially from the White Road
Bridge access north to Indian River.  One of our group said they had
encountered as many as 75 tubes through this two-mile stretch a few
summers ago.  It was a group an Indian River outfitter had put into
the river; talk about a log – er, tube – jam.
Henley’s will spot your vehicle if you have your own watercraft.  For
more information on canoe and kayak rental rates and trips, call
231-525-9994 or log onto www.henleysrentals.com.  Big Bear Adventures,
located in Indian River, is another outfitter servicing the Sturgeon
River.  They can be reached at 231-238-8181 or by logging onto

If you are looking for like-minded people that love to do river
floats, the Traverse Area Paddle Club, on average, will have over 150
trips scheduled on area rivers and lakes throughout the paddling
months of April through October.  Check them out at
www.traverseareapaddleclub.org.  Membership is only $15 individual or
$25 for a family.
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