Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Shingle Mill Pathway
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Shingle Mill Pathway

Mike Terrell - July 26th, 2010
Shingle Mill Pathway: As close as you can get to wilderness in the lower peninsula
By Mike Terrell
One of the great wilderness tracts in the Lower Peninsula is the
97,000-acre Pigeon River Country State Forest.  Located east of I-75
and Vanderbilt, it is host to a wide variety of outdoor activities;
hiking, mountain biking, trout fishing, hunting, horseback riding,
and, in the winter, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and
snowmobiling.
 While it may be a misnomer to call the state forest wilderness – most
of it is accessible* – the Pigeon remains a haven of peace and
wildness.  It is home to the largest elk herd east of the Mississippi
River, which I’ve seen while both mountain biking and cross-country
skiing.  There are also lots of deer, black bear, bobcat and snowshoe
hare.  You see massive beaver lodges on many of the little lakes that
dot the area.  Pileated woodpeckers and eagles are often spotted.
I’ve never seen one, but the DNRE has confirmed that wolves are
present in the northern Lower Peninsula.  With a natural food source
like deer and elk present, the Pigeon would be a very attractive
habitat for wolves, but, to my knowledge, none have been spotted yet.

CHOICES, CHOICES
Ernest Hemingway hunted and fished all three major rivers as a
teenager – the Pigeon, Sturgeon and Black rivers – that flow north
through the state forest. He loved the area and wrote that it was
“wild as the devil.”
The forest offers a couple of opportunities for backpackers.  There’s
the High Country Pathway, a 77-mile loop that passes through four
counties and the heart of the northern Lower Peninsula.  Most
backpackers need at least five days, and many take a week, to complete
the circle hike.
You can camp almost anywhere along the route as long as you’re 100
feet away from the trail or any body of nearby water, and there are
also designated campgrounds.  Three of the campgrounds exist along the
most popular trail, the Shingle Mill Pathway, which is an 11-mile loop
with shorter segments.  The first-half of the loop shares the same
trail as the High Country Pathway.
Shingle Mill is popular with both hikers, for overnight trips, and
mountain bikers, who enjoy biking along the scenic Pigeon River.
Along the way you cross the Pigeon twice, cruise along scenic
“sinkhole lakes” -- meaning small lakes and lily ponds -- and climb to
a panoramic overlook of Grass Lake and distant hills up to 20 miles
away.  The trail is mostly hard-pack dirt with a few sandy sections
and lots of roots.  Oh yeah, there’s also one long section of
boardwalk over a bog-like area near the end.  Walking your mountain
bike over the fairly narrow walkway is a good idea.

LOGISTICS
The trail starts in the back of the campground that you encounter
after crossing the Pigeon River Bridge on Sturgeon Valley Road out of
Vanderbilt.  The bridge is about 11 miles due east of the village.
You park across the road from the campground in the designated parking
area.
There are three small loops when you first start out that total about
a mile-and-a-half between signposts 1-4.  When you come to signpost 3
you head toward signpost 5 and the 6, 10 and 11-mile trails.  If you
head towards signpost 4 it leads back to the campground and starting
point.
You quickly move away from the river, which you won’t see for another
three miles.  The trail climbs a wooded ridge once you leave the
river.  It descends to the Pigeon River Country State Forest
headquarters at about two miles, which is an impressive large log
lodge full of information on the land, its history, and all the
recreational opportunities that it holds.  The lobby displays are
quite nice.
At three miles the pathway drops down into another campground and
crosses the Pigeon on a forest road bridge where you can soak your
feet in a pool that campers created by partially damning the stream
with rocks.  Many of the campsites are right along the rustic river.
There are toilets, picnic tables and drinking water from an artesian
well.
The six-mile loop breaks off here, climbs a steep ridge and heads over
to rejoin the longer loop at signpost 12.  It’s about a
mile-and-a-half across to the post and than another mile-and-a-half
back to the Pigeon River Bridge campground and starting point.

GHOST TOWN
If you choose to continue on the longer, scenic trail, you head on
over to signpost 7 where the 11-mile loop splits from the 10-mile
loop.  I wouldn’t recommend the extra mile for mountain bikers.  If
you’re hiking, it’s okay.  It drops steeply down by the river again
and back up.  It does pass a historical marker where an old lumbering
mill once stood that was called Cornwall Flats.
The 10-mile loop continues on over to Grass Lake, another walk-in
campground on a lily-padded pond, and climbs to the scenic overlook at
signpost 10.  Distant hills, 20 miles away, blend into the horizon.
It’s a great place to relax and enjoy the incredible view after the
long climb.
At signpost 11 the High Country Pathway, which you’ve been sharing
since leaving the starting point, heads on north and Shingle Mill
turns back south.   After a nice long downhill run by the Devil’s Soup
Bowl, one of two sinkhole lakes that you pass, you drop down along
beautiful Grass Lake.  Stop and observe some of the large beaver
lodges found along its edge.
The Pathway continues rolling through forest and some extensive
clear-cut areas before passing Ford Lake and reaching signpost 12.
You’re just a little over a mile from the end.
It’s one of the truly great mountain bike rides in the Lower
Peninsula, and not a bad hike either.  Jeremiah Johnson would have
loved this place.

“Wilderness” is a term generally reserved to any place that requires
at least a full day’s hike from any road -- ed.

 
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