Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Random Thoughts

George Foster - October 9th, 2003
Rush Limbaugh‘s sneak attack - on himself
Rush knew what he was doing.
His characterization of Donavan McNabb as an overrated NFL quarterback (because McNabb is black) was a trap. Gottcha.
It is not a racist act to accuse the media‘s football coverage of being slanted on skin color. It is only an opinion. If you listened to or read Rush Limbaugh‘s remarks on ESPN TV about the Philadelphia Eagles‘ QB and didn‘t know who was speaking, you may have considered the words insensitive - but certainly not racist. When Limbaugh discusses race, however (and most anything else), divisiveness is sure to follow.
Rush knows football. Football is his passion and he watches it religiously. Yet, his statement that degrades McNabb‘s abilities is absurd - and Limbaugh knows it. McNabb has one of the strongest arms and is certainly the best running QB in the NFL. He has been voted into the Pro Bowl (pro football‘s all-star game) and his play helped lift a mediocre team to elite status in a very short time. The Philadelphia Eagles have won 36 of 58 games in which McNabb has started. Many experts think McNabb is underrated and maybe the most valuable player in the league.
Also, Limbaugh‘s charge that “the media has been very desirous that a black quarterback do well“ is laughable. There are plenty of black QB‘s doing well in the NFL - Michael Vick, Steve McNair, etc. Also, since 70% of current NFL players are black, why would there be any liberal media bias (as Rush insinuates) to promote blacks unduly in a sport where relatively few whites are even playing?
Rush is not stupid. He knew his comments would create a firestorm in the media and put El Rushbo in the spotlight where he longs to be. He has been accused of racism in the past and knew any opinion of his regarding race would automatically bring a knee-jerk reaction from his critics.
So, why did he do it? Rush must be anxious about his future earning power. His radio audience peaked years ago. His first fling with a television show in the 1990‘s ended quickly and with a big thud. With the Clintons out of office almost three years now, it is a little more difficult to blame the world‘s ills on Bill and Hillary and keep a straight face. Limbaugh‘s reign as conservative talk-show king may be in peril.
Rush has been preaching to the choir for a long time now with few new converts. He must have believed this gig as a football analyst on ESPN was a potential coup for the Rush Limbaugh radio show. The TV roundtable provided a forum to be taken seriously in front of people other than same old Dittoheads who regularly listen to the radio program.
I‘ll bet Rush was thinking, “Let‘s see, what is the best way to be noticed by more potential radio listeners (men aged 25-35) who are also the largest audience for the ESPN TV show? “Aha, I‘ve got it: cause a commotion by pulling out the race card on the ESPN telecast. “Then point out to the world why it was not a racist statement - only an opinion twisted into racism by the liberal media.“
It seemed like a brilliant maneuver - Rush immediately got the attention he craved. Every TV news program ran interviews of those who disagreed with Rush‘s statements -on and on and on. In the end, the criticism was so severe, though, Rush had to resign.
Whatever happened to standing up for principle? If his remarks were not racist (I don‘t believe they were), why didn‘t Limbaugh hang in there and deal with the fallout?
What Rush didn‘t bargain for was the fact that he can‘t censor opposing opinions as he does on his radio show. When insensitive comments are made on talk radio, it is expected. Loyal listeners laugh and demand even more. People who disagree with radio hosts rarely receive air-time.
When insensitive remarks are made on national TV, the dynamic changes. Ask Michael Savage if you don‘t believe me. A cross-section of Americans with a wide range of opinions tune in to these broadcasts. Opposing beliefs cannot be dismissed so easily.
I don‘t know if Rush is a racist or not - he insists he is not. There is one thing that Rush Limbaugh would have to admit, though. He can dish it out, but he can‘t take it.

 
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