Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Features · What the river dragged in
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What the river dragged in

Doug Stanton - August 9th, 2010
What the River Dragged In
By Doug Stanton
It’s strange having your own oil spill.
What we have, of course, is a blip compared to the one in the Gulf of
Mexico, which this week formally broke all records for offshore
spills. But after watching the gulf catastrophe unfold from afar, the
news that oil was gushing from a pipeline just three hours south of
here into a small creek that flows into the Kalamazoo River and,
potentially, into Lake Michigan, came as a surprise.
Until last week, I wasn’t aware that a pipeline even existed, though I
must have driven over or past it hundreds of times. The leak is now
under control, but a good storm could still blow some of the estimated
one million gallons of spilled oil into the lake, and maybe even north
along its sandy coast, past numerous resort towns and into the Grand
Traverse Bay, to a place called Clinch Park, where I’ve been swimming
most mornings from June to October since I was kid.
It’s hard enough to try to capture oil floating in an ocean. But oil
moving downstream in a swift river? Forget about it. As the
pre-Socratic philosopher Heraclitus said, you can’t step into the same
river twice.
But despite the danger to the lake, many people here, busy enjoying
their summer vacations, haven’t paid much attention to the spill.
After all, Lake Michigan has lived through worse. It may be near the
center of the continent, but it’s not immune to the outside world, as
we’ve learned over and over.
First there were the invasive Asian carp, swimming around the Chicago
River a mere six miles from the mouth of the lake. These voracious
eaters get excited by the sound of boat motors and can leap by the
hundreds into the air all at once, in some hellish version of a water
ballet. An oil spill seems almost benign in comparison.
We’ve also had to contend with an invasion of gobies - small, bug-eyed
fish you’re supposed to kill if you catch. They disrupt the food chain
that normally supports native lake trout, perch and bass. They entered
the lake in the ballast water of international shipping traffic, along
with zebra mussels, which filter micro-organisms - also food for
native fish - out of the water.
As a result of the zebra mussel infestation, the lake, several summers
ago, was often as clear as a Bahamian bay. When I swam, I could see 50
feet in any direction. This extra sunlight fed more algae at deeper
depths, which created algal blooms that floated up on the beach in
smelly heaps. Now that the mussels have died off, the lake has
returned to something like normal.
So for now, I swim. Winters are so long in northern Michigan, nearly
nine months of gray skies and deep snow, that summer comes as a fresh
burst. Amnesia sets in—you forget that winter will ever return.
Friends from other parts of the country descend. The days ripen
perfectly, the air no warmer or colder than your skin so that the
edges of your body seem to extend beyond you, up and down the
tree-lined streets.
Traverse City sits halfway between the North Pole and the Equator, and
our summer days are long. The light seems to take forever to vanish
from the sky and, when it does, it goes out like someone folding a
white sheet in the dark. A flare on the horizon. Then a rustle:
I swim in the midst of bad news to stay sane. I crawl over the sand
bottom in six feet of water, which is cold and green, and nothing has
changed in my life - I’m a kid again. No zebra mussels, no carp, no
oil spill headed my way. No politicians, no bloggers. Every day I step
refreshed and clean from the water, and go up to the bookstore,
Horizon’s, and order a coffee and stand on the street in flip-flops in
the chill air, feeling the hot cup in my hand, the fine texture of its
paper, feeling as if I’ve just come awake from a dream.
And what I carry around in my head is this, the image of the water, of
looking around 20 feet in any direction, and beyond my periphery the
lake darkening to the color of light in a storm. Sometimes I see fish
slicing around my field of vision - silver missiles headed to deeper
The work day is about to begin; traffic pours past on the four-lane
parkway. I wonder what the people driving by think of me, when I’m
swimming out there along the buoys; and in a time when there is too
much news to think about, I hope they think nothing at all.
When the oil spill in Michigan began, I heard about a memorial service
for Paul Miller, a 22-year-old Marine corporal from the nearby village
of Lake Ann, who was killed on July 19 in Afghanistan. Later in the
week, I stood in the funeral home, not far from the beach where I
swim, and stared at Corporal Miller’s flag-draped coffin.
I thought this: that the world’s troubles can be nearer to us than we
think, flowing in our direction, flowing toward home.
And while it’s true that we used to live in Lake Ann, and our son may
have played summer baseball with Corporal Miller years earlier, I
don’t remember meeting him. Maybe I passed him on the street, a tyke
headed over to the ice cream shop with his parents, where we were
standing in line, too, with our children, all of us oblivious to the
news to come, the depth and coldness of the water ahead.

This was reprinted with permission from the New York Times, which
published the essay last week. Doug Stanton is founder of the
National Writers Series, a year-round book festival, and author of
“Horse Soldiers: The Extraordinary Story of a Band of U.S. Soldiers
Who Rode to Victory in Afghanistan” and “In Harm’s Way: The Sinking
of the USS Indianapolis.”

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