Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · College & the middle...
. . . .

College & the middle class

Robert Downes - August 9th, 2010
College & the Middle Class
Several years ago, I hurt a reader’s feelings by reporting on the
amount of income it takes to be considered “middle class” in America
these days.
I can’t remember the amount now -- it was probably some arbitrary
figure cooked up by an economics professor.
But I do remember the crushed look on her face as she said, “If that’s
how much money you need to earn, then I’m no longer in the middle
To a single mom trying to get by on two part-time jobs, the income
level I reported in my column was a barrier to hope and the American
Being in the middle class is a very big deal in America because it
means you’re “okay.” You haven’t slipped or been left behind. You’re
still a contender for the American dream of owning a home in a nice
part of town and providing for your family. Being middle class means
having enough money to have no worries for retirement -- something
that is increasingly a fleeting dream.
The reader’s words left an impression, and inspired me to revise my
definition of what it is to be middle class in America. You see,
although she had a limited income barely above the minimum wage, she
was somehow figuring out a way to send her daughter through college.
Perhaps that was with the help of grants, loans, and urging her kid to
take up the slack with part-time work and summer jobs, but somehow,
she was making it happen.
So I’m no economist, but that has since become my measure of whether a
person is in the middle class: if they have the wherewithal to somehow
get their kid through college by hook or by crook.
What is money anyway? Many of us know people making six figures who
are house poor from three mortgages and neck-deep in credit card and
auto debt. Ironically, in America, you can be “rich” and widely
considered to be a member of the “upper” middle class and still be
poverty-stricken -- a slave to your Lexus payment and your six-bedroom
But to get a kid through college -- that takes good old-fashioned
middle-class values of hard work and gumption, brass-tacked to your
workboots (or high heels, as the case may be).
And these days, getting a kid through school is brutal. In addition
to the recession, there are factors such as rising tuition, housing
and food costs, and fewer student jobs to go around.
It lends credence to the calls from some sectors of academia to end
the traditional 4-year college undergrad education in favor of a
3-year degree. Why? Because many middle class parents and students
can no longer afford to go the distance for a 4-year degree.
Especially when today’s 4-year degrees are packed with dubious
elective courses, the need for which defies the economic realities of
our times.
I can’t imagine what sacrifices parents are going through to send
their kids to schools where the annual bill is $30,000 or more. My
wife and I were determined to spare our daughter the serfdom of
student loans when she graduates and we’ve paid the equivalent of a
nice starter home to her business college so far, just for a two-year
Obviously, as any college grad or parent knows, the money we’ve
spent and the years of learning won’t guarantee a job in our
daughter’s hoped-for profession. What we’ve paid for runs more along
the lines of an experience, memories, and a chance at a good career.
Just a chance.
A chance, perhaps, to remain in the middle class, and someday pass on
the opportunity to a child of her own.

Carp Diem
Over the past few months, sportsmen, environmentalists and political
leaders have warned of the threat of the Asian carp making its way
into Lake Michigan via the waterways from the Mississippi River.
But no one’s been watching Lake Michigan’s “back door.”
Weighing up to 100 lbs., the carp are aquatic eating machines,
scooping up algae and plankton. The fear is that if they make their
way into the Great Lakes, they‘ll consume the lower end of the food
chain, starving trout and other fish species out of existence.
“They’re like the locusts of the river,” says David Ullrich, executive
director of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative.
While attempts are (slowly) underway to block passage of the carp
through the canals and waterways of Chicago, a new threat has arisen
far to the east.
The Wildlife Volunteer, a publication of the Michigan Wildlife
Conservancy, notes that Asian carp have been found in Lake Erie as far
back as 1995. A carp was also captured in a commercial net off Point
Pelee in
Ontario in 2000.
It’s believed that the carp were released from private ponds in Ohio,
or released by individuals in Toronto, where a large China town
provides a market for the fish.
This is sort of like getting flattened by a misguided driver on a
one-way street while you’re watching for traffic coming from the right
direction. We need to start looking both ways if we’re going to send
the Asian carp packing.

  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5