Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · College & the middle...
. . . .

College & the middle class

Robert Downes - August 9th, 2010
College & the Middle Class
Several years ago, I hurt a reader’s feelings by reporting on the
amount of income it takes to be considered “middle class” in America
these days.
I can’t remember the amount now -- it was probably some arbitrary
figure cooked up by an economics professor.
But I do remember the crushed look on her face as she said, “If that’s
how much money you need to earn, then I’m no longer in the middle
class.”
To a single mom trying to get by on two part-time jobs, the income
level I reported in my column was a barrier to hope and the American
dream.
Being in the middle class is a very big deal in America because it
means you’re “okay.” You haven’t slipped or been left behind. You’re
still a contender for the American dream of owning a home in a nice
part of town and providing for your family. Being middle class means
having enough money to have no worries for retirement -- something
that is increasingly a fleeting dream.
The reader’s words left an impression, and inspired me to revise my
definition of what it is to be middle class in America. You see,
although she had a limited income barely above the minimum wage, she
was somehow figuring out a way to send her daughter through college.
Perhaps that was with the help of grants, loans, and urging her kid to
take up the slack with part-time work and summer jobs, but somehow,
she was making it happen.
So I’m no economist, but that has since become my measure of whether a
person is in the middle class: if they have the wherewithal to somehow
get their kid through college by hook or by crook.
What is money anyway? Many of us know people making six figures who
are house poor from three mortgages and neck-deep in credit card and
auto debt. Ironically, in America, you can be “rich” and widely
considered to be a member of the “upper” middle class and still be
poverty-stricken -- a slave to your Lexus payment and your six-bedroom
mansionnette.
But to get a kid through college -- that takes good old-fashioned
middle-class values of hard work and gumption, brass-tacked to your
workboots (or high heels, as the case may be).
And these days, getting a kid through school is brutal. In addition
to the recession, there are factors such as rising tuition, housing
and food costs, and fewer student jobs to go around.
It lends credence to the calls from some sectors of academia to end
the traditional 4-year college undergrad education in favor of a
3-year degree. Why? Because many middle class parents and students
can no longer afford to go the distance for a 4-year degree.
Especially when today’s 4-year degrees are packed with dubious
elective courses, the need for which defies the economic realities of
our times.
I can’t imagine what sacrifices parents are going through to send
their kids to schools where the annual bill is $30,000 or more. My
wife and I were determined to spare our daughter the serfdom of
student loans when she graduates and we’ve paid the equivalent of a
nice starter home to her business college so far, just for a two-year
degree.
Obviously, as any college grad or parent knows, the money we’ve
spent and the years of learning won’t guarantee a job in our
daughter’s hoped-for profession. What we’ve paid for runs more along
the lines of an experience, memories, and a chance at a good career.
Just a chance.
A chance, perhaps, to remain in the middle class, and someday pass on
the opportunity to a child of her own.

Carp Diem
Over the past few months, sportsmen, environmentalists and political
leaders have warned of the threat of the Asian carp making its way
into Lake Michigan via the waterways from the Mississippi River.
But no one’s been watching Lake Michigan’s “back door.”
Weighing up to 100 lbs., the carp are aquatic eating machines,
scooping up algae and plankton. The fear is that if they make their
way into the Great Lakes, they‘ll consume the lower end of the food
chain, starving trout and other fish species out of existence.
“They’re like the locusts of the river,” says David Ullrich, executive
director of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative.
While attempts are (slowly) underway to block passage of the carp
through the canals and waterways of Chicago, a new threat has arisen
far to the east.
The Wildlife Volunteer, a publication of the Michigan Wildlife
Conservancy, notes that Asian carp have been found in Lake Erie as far
back as 1995. A carp was also captured in a commercial net off Point
Pelee in
Ontario in 2000.
It’s believed that the carp were released from private ponds in Ohio,
or released by individuals in Toronto, where a large China town
provides a market for the fish.
This is sort of like getting flattened by a misguided driver on a
one-way street while you’re watching for traffic coming from the right
direction. We need to start looking both ways if we’re going to send
the Asian carp packing.

 
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