Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · College & the middle...
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College & the middle class

Robert Downes - August 9th, 2010
College & the Middle Class
Several years ago, I hurt a reader’s feelings by reporting on the
amount of income it takes to be considered “middle class” in America
these days.
I can’t remember the amount now -- it was probably some arbitrary
figure cooked up by an economics professor.
But I do remember the crushed look on her face as she said, “If that’s
how much money you need to earn, then I’m no longer in the middle
class.”
To a single mom trying to get by on two part-time jobs, the income
level I reported in my column was a barrier to hope and the American
dream.
Being in the middle class is a very big deal in America because it
means you’re “okay.” You haven’t slipped or been left behind. You’re
still a contender for the American dream of owning a home in a nice
part of town and providing for your family. Being middle class means
having enough money to have no worries for retirement -- something
that is increasingly a fleeting dream.
The reader’s words left an impression, and inspired me to revise my
definition of what it is to be middle class in America. You see,
although she had a limited income barely above the minimum wage, she
was somehow figuring out a way to send her daughter through college.
Perhaps that was with the help of grants, loans, and urging her kid to
take up the slack with part-time work and summer jobs, but somehow,
she was making it happen.
So I’m no economist, but that has since become my measure of whether a
person is in the middle class: if they have the wherewithal to somehow
get their kid through college by hook or by crook.
What is money anyway? Many of us know people making six figures who
are house poor from three mortgages and neck-deep in credit card and
auto debt. Ironically, in America, you can be “rich” and widely
considered to be a member of the “upper” middle class and still be
poverty-stricken -- a slave to your Lexus payment and your six-bedroom
mansionnette.
But to get a kid through college -- that takes good old-fashioned
middle-class values of hard work and gumption, brass-tacked to your
workboots (or high heels, as the case may be).
And these days, getting a kid through school is brutal. In addition
to the recession, there are factors such as rising tuition, housing
and food costs, and fewer student jobs to go around.
It lends credence to the calls from some sectors of academia to end
the traditional 4-year college undergrad education in favor of a
3-year degree. Why? Because many middle class parents and students
can no longer afford to go the distance for a 4-year degree.
Especially when today’s 4-year degrees are packed with dubious
elective courses, the need for which defies the economic realities of
our times.
I can’t imagine what sacrifices parents are going through to send
their kids to schools where the annual bill is $30,000 or more. My
wife and I were determined to spare our daughter the serfdom of
student loans when she graduates and we’ve paid the equivalent of a
nice starter home to her business college so far, just for a two-year
degree.
Obviously, as any college grad or parent knows, the money we’ve
spent and the years of learning won’t guarantee a job in our
daughter’s hoped-for profession. What we’ve paid for runs more along
the lines of an experience, memories, and a chance at a good career.
Just a chance.
A chance, perhaps, to remain in the middle class, and someday pass on
the opportunity to a child of her own.

Carp Diem
Over the past few months, sportsmen, environmentalists and political
leaders have warned of the threat of the Asian carp making its way
into Lake Michigan via the waterways from the Mississippi River.
But no one’s been watching Lake Michigan’s “back door.”
Weighing up to 100 lbs., the carp are aquatic eating machines,
scooping up algae and plankton. The fear is that if they make their
way into the Great Lakes, they‘ll consume the lower end of the food
chain, starving trout and other fish species out of existence.
“They’re like the locusts of the river,” says David Ullrich, executive
director of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative.
While attempts are (slowly) underway to block passage of the carp
through the canals and waterways of Chicago, a new threat has arisen
far to the east.
The Wildlife Volunteer, a publication of the Michigan Wildlife
Conservancy, notes that Asian carp have been found in Lake Erie as far
back as 1995. A carp was also captured in a commercial net off Point
Pelee in
Ontario in 2000.
It’s believed that the carp were released from private ponds in Ohio,
or released by individuals in Toronto, where a large China town
provides a market for the fish.
This is sort of like getting flattened by a misguided driver on a
one-way street while you’re watching for traffic coming from the right
direction. We need to start looking both ways if we’re going to send
the Asian carp packing.

 
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