Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Big Band Bill plays Charlevoix
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Big Band Bill plays Charlevoix

Kristi Kates - May 17th, 2010
Big Band Bill plays Charlevoix: Trumpeter brings memories of playing with the greats
By Kristi Kates
It was Bill Hart’s fourth grade year in Iowa, where his parents owned
a service station. Traveling big bands would stop on their way to and
from gigs to grab some gas and perhaps an ice-cold Coca-Cola; all of
them seemed pretty exotic to the little boy.
One day, Vaughn Monroe’s band was passing through, and one of his
musicians took the time to say a few words to Bill. Little did he know
how influential those words would be.
“We’re going to play tonight in Cedar Rapids,” the anonymous musician
explained, “there will be lots of good food, and people will be
dancing. Then we’ll get back on the bus, drive to a different city,
and do the same thing tomorrow night!”
The road had now officially called to
Bill Hart, and his trumpeting career was about to begin.

BIG BAND BEGINNINGS
“They all seemed so happy,” Hart says, remembering his first meeting
with the big-band musicians, “and I thought, ‘how do I sign up to be
part of this’?”
Hart began playing trumpet that year, supported by his mother, who
played piano, and his grandmother, who lived with the family and gave
Hart “lots of encouragement,” he says.
When Hart’s father passed away, the family moved to East Grand Rapids,
which, while from sad beginnings, was another turning point in Hart’s
musical growth.
“Our move was a tremendous break for me, as the band director there,
Warren Faulkner, was an excellent trumpet player and was passionate
about teaching. He stayed after school three or four nights a week,
playing trumpet duets. I ended up going to Interlochen on a
scholarship for several summer sessions, and played first chair in the
University Symphony.”
The following two summers would finally see Hart stepping onto the
tour bus with Chicago’s Peter Palmer Orchestra, where he found himself
sharing stages with the likes of The Lennon Sisters and Les Paul.

TOMMY AND LOUIS
In June 1962, Hart met trumpet great Don “Jake” Jacoby during his
junior year of high school via Mr. Faulkner’s introduction. Jacoby and
his wife took Hart into their home for a week, treating him like a
family member and gifting him with lessons, a new trumpet, and visits
to Jacoby’s own studio sessions.
“I heard wonderful, inspiring music there,” Hart remembers.
Jacoby then recommended Hart for a position in the Tommy Dorsey
Orchestra, and his career took yet another big step forward
“I toured with the Dorsey band from June through December of 1962,”
Hart explains, “the band is still touring today, as is the Glenn
Miller Orchestra; these bands are called ‘ghost bands,’ performing
even though their leaders are gone.”
One night in Fruitport, Michigan, Hart was at the dance pavilion, and
found himself sitting next to none other than the great Louis
Armstrong during an intermission.
“His sideman stopped me, explaining that the backstage area was for
musicians,” Hart says, “but Louis said, ‘if he’s a trumpet player,
it’s okay.’ He gave me eye contact, answered all my questions, and
wrote down the address of a place to get his favorite lip salve. The
friendly advice helped me become a better trumpet player; and I always
play Louis’ “What a Wonderful World” at my programs.”
Hart would run into Armstrong again at a later date, at the Croydon
Hotel in Chicago.
“Louis stayed there, also Woody Herman and Count Basie,” Hart
explains, “it was a real ‘band’ hotel. It was wonderful just being in
the same room with them and hearing them talk.”

MUSIC TO MATH
Hart’s many conversations with famed musicians - some of which he’ll
be sharing at his upcoming lecture event at the Charlevoix Library -
both helped him continue pursuing his musical career and his secondary
career, as well. Hart has now accomplished 50 years of professional
trumpet playing, and 46 years as a math teacher at Detroit’s Macomb
Community College; he says that each career affects and supports the
other.
“Knowing the power of the encouraging remarks I received from the
likes of Armstrong and Henry Mancini - who was a judge at the
Collegiate Jazz Festival in April 1962 when I won the Trumpet Award -
I enjoy talking to my math students and letting them know that they’re
going to do well in any math course they encounter,” he explains.
In what is perhaps now his third career - as a lecturer - Hart shares
his favorite big-band stories and songs (“anything from the Great
American songbook, really - music by Irving Berlin, Cole Porter,
Mancini, George Gershwin...”) and plays snippets of trumpet music to
give the audience an authentic ear as to what those days sounded like.
He also plans to continue teaching - and won’t give up the music any
time soon, either, continuing to play live with an award-winning
Detroit-based band.
“I am a regular with The Rhythm Society Orchestra,” Hart says, “it’s a
16-piece swing band.”
And he’s taken the musical lessons he’s learned over the years to both
heart and horn.
“I enjoy playing close to the melody whenever I do my programs,” Hart
explains, “it’s like Louis said; ‘Billy, you’re never wrong when
you’re playing the melody.’”
Bill Hart will share stories from his 50 years as a trumpet player at
his highly-interactive “Big Band Memories” lecture/program at the
Charlevoix Public Library on Sunday, May 23 at 2 p.m.; telephone
231-547-2651 for details. More information on Bill Hart and his music
may be found at the Rhythm Society Orchestra’s website,
www.rhythmsociety.net, while his math efforts are showcased at
www.mathwithhart.com.

 
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