Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play: Arctic Monkeys, The...
. . . .

4Play: Arctic Monkeys, The National, Jonsi, Band of Horses

Kristi Kates - May 17th, 2010
Arctic Monkeys - My Propeller - Domino
Of remarkable note for a mere 4-song EP (likely a fan-placating measure until the next AM album is well underway), My Propeller’s title track is the definite standout here, taken directly from the band’s last full-length, Humbug, and showcasing the English band’s new, California-inflected sound, in part courtesy of new producer Josh Homme. Accompanying the single are quirky “The Afternoon’s Hat,” the guitar-heavy “Joining the Dots,” and the danceable, confident “Don’t Forget Whose Legs You’re On.”






The National - High Violet - 4AD
Moody and manic by turns, The National’s latest is full of both spiky attacks and contrasting introspective (if gloomy) numbers. Harmony-rich and festooned with horns and strings, the Brooklyn band knows how to coordinate texture and temper, hitting some of their best moments on this album towards the end of the set. “Sorrow” is a heavy yet compelling song, with the weight deftly echoed in the drums/percussion; and “Conversation 16”’s wind instruments add an interesting detached element to the song that suits it well.





Jonsi - Go - XL Recordings
After ten years of performing as frontman for Icelandic electro-mood outfit Sigur Ros, Jn Thor Birgisson, aka Jonsi, has decided to strike out on his own (but don’t worry, Sigur fans, he’s reportedly not leaving the band any time soon.) Jonsi’s solo works are more dynamic and pop than what he creates with Sigur Ros, like the harmonic lift of “Go Do,” the dark pop balladry of “Grow Till Tall,” and the accomplished songcraft of “Sinking Friendships”; lyrically, things are a bit obscure, but all the better for letting the instrumentals show through.





Band of Horses - Infinite Arms - Columbia
Horses’ third full-length finds them at a new major label home, with two new bandmates (Tyler Ramsey and Bill Reynolds) and working wix mixmaster Dave Sardy on the album itself. Choosing to open in an unusual fashion with a ballad (the pretty “Factory”) instead of a more propulsive number, they set the album’s tone right away with the density of their guitar work and the mid-range tempo. The title track adds a more ethereal feel to those guitars, while “Neighbor” mixes in organ, and “NW Apt.” throws in a little unexpected pep.


 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close