Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

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The murder & madness of MacBeth

Erin Cowell - July 5th, 2010
The Murder & Madness of Macbeth: Interlochen production offers an intimate look into a royal crime
By Erin Crowell
Macbeth -- the psychological story of murder, power and a royal
couple’s downward spiral – is William Shakespeare’s most infamous
tragedy, aside from the star-crossed lovers of Romeo & Juliet.
Interlochen Art Center’s professional theatre—a 32-person ensemble of
faculty, staff and alumni—presents Macbeth as the third installment of
the its annual Shakespeare Festival, July 1-11.
The first two productions included the lighthearted comedies Twelfth
Night and The Taming of the Shrew. This season, the arts center goes
“We chose Macbeth as our first tragedy, to break out of the comedy
mode,” says director and Shakespeare Festival creator William Church.
“I think it’s the most accessible to audiences. It’s scary, sexy and

What makes this production of Macbeth different from others?
“We have personalized this play. We made Macbeth a real person,” says
James Francis Ginty, who plays the title role.
Ginty, who graduated from Interlochen in 1999, currently lives in Los
Angeles. He is credited with acting roles in films such as “K-19: The
Widowmaker” and “Surrogates,” along with appearances on television
shows “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Days of Our Lives.”
“For me, the excitement is the audience’s ability to experience what
Macbeth is feeling. You can really read his thoughts,” says Church.
A major contribution to the play’s intimacy comes from the venue.
Performed in Harvey Theater, on the Interlochen campus, Macbeth will
take place on a three-quarters thrust stage, with the audience
situated on three of the four sides.
“This sort of proximity and intimacy really helps for this type of
production,” says Church. “For the set, itself, we’re collaborating
with sculptor Bill Allen.”

Allen—a local artist whose work has been featured at several venues,
including the Dennos Museum Center and the Michigan Legacy Art Park—is
known for his latest abstract and dark figures.
“I checked out his work and I was struck by how tormented, frightening
and disturbing the sculptures are,” says Church. “It really felt like
Allen has worked on several artistic collaborations; including his
work with poet Fleda Brown in the spring exhibit “ConTexTure,” at the
Dennos Museum Center.
“I enjoy using my art,” explains Allen. “I feel it expands the meaning
of my work.”
The sculptures exude the torment that Shakespeare’s main character
experiences throughout the play; but, this production of Macbeth is
more than just “double, double toil and trouble.”
“We’ve infused a sense of tenderness,” says Ginty, “between my
character and Lady Macbeth,” (played by alumna Caitlin
Ginty says Macbeth isn’t about a guy who’s crazy, but rather “a man who falls.”
One of the challenges for Ginty was telling his agent that he would
disappear into the Northern Michigan woods for several weeks.
“Theatre doesn’t pay the, uh, premiums that film and television do,’
he explains. “My agent asked me, ‘Why would you want to go to the
middle of nowhere for practically no money?’
“I said, ‘this is where I went to school.’
“His response was, ‘Great, give a lecture,’” Ginty laughs.
Church says all the alumni have been fully supportive of the production.
“There’s a lot of talent here,” says Church. “It’s a way to celebrate
Interlochen’s theater alumni. It also gives our faculty and staff a
way to keep up on their art.”
Church and Ginty believe everyone will be able to relate to the play –
whether it’s thrilling sword fights or the romanticism of the
Shakespearean world.
“It’s a great first-time Shakespeare experience,” says Ginty. “We want
people to leave this play saying, ‘Man, I really want that Shakespeare
guy to become a part of my life.”

The Third Annual Shakespeare Festival is happening now, July 1-11, at
Interlochen’s Harvey Theater. Tickets are $26 and are available at
tickets.interlochen.org or by calling the box office at 800-681-5920.
But, hurry – they’re going fast.

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