Letters 10-12-2015

Replacing Pipeline Is Safe Bet On Sept. 25, Al Monaco, president and CEO of Enbridge, addressed members of the Northern Michigan Chamber Alliance. His message was, “I want to be clear. We wouldn’t be operating this line if we didn’t think it was safe.”

We pretty much have to take him for his word...

Know The Root Of Activism Author and rabbi Harold Kushner has said, “People become activists to overcome their childhood fear of insignificance.” The need to feel important drives them. They endeavor good works not to help the poor or sick or unfortunate but to fill the void in their own empty souls. Their various “causes” are simply a means to an end as they work to assuage their own broken hearts...

Climate’s Cost One of the arguments used to delay action on climate change is that it would be too expensive. Such proponents think leaving environmental problems alone would save us money. This viewpoint ignores the cost of extreme weather events that are related to global warming...

A Special Edition Cuckoo Clock The Republican National Committee should issue a special edition cuckoo clock commemorating the great (and lesser) debates and campaign 2016...

Problems On The Left Contrary to letters in the Oct 5th edition, Julie Racine’s letter is nothing but drivel, a mindless regurgitation of left-wing stuff, nonsense, and talking points. They are a litany of all that is wrong with the left: Never address an issue honestly, avoid all facts, blame instead of solving; and when all else fails, do it all over again...

Thanks, Jack It is so very difficult for the average American to understand the complex issues our country faces in far off places around the globe. (Columnist) Jack Segal’s career and his special ability to explain these issues in plain English in many forums make him a precious asset to all of us in northern Michigan...

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The murder & madness of MacBeth

Erin Cowell - July 5th, 2010
The Murder & Madness of Macbeth: Interlochen production offers an intimate look into a royal crime
By Erin Crowell
Macbeth -- the psychological story of murder, power and a royal
couple’s downward spiral – is William Shakespeare’s most infamous
tragedy, aside from the star-crossed lovers of Romeo & Juliet.
Interlochen Art Center’s professional theatre—a 32-person ensemble of
faculty, staff and alumni—presents Macbeth as the third installment of
the its annual Shakespeare Festival, July 1-11.
The first two productions included the lighthearted comedies Twelfth
Night and The Taming of the Shrew. This season, the arts center goes
“We chose Macbeth as our first tragedy, to break out of the comedy
mode,” says director and Shakespeare Festival creator William Church.
“I think it’s the most accessible to audiences. It’s scary, sexy and

What makes this production of Macbeth different from others?
“We have personalized this play. We made Macbeth a real person,” says
James Francis Ginty, who plays the title role.
Ginty, who graduated from Interlochen in 1999, currently lives in Los
Angeles. He is credited with acting roles in films such as “K-19: The
Widowmaker” and “Surrogates,” along with appearances on television
shows “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Days of Our Lives.”
“For me, the excitement is the audience’s ability to experience what
Macbeth is feeling. You can really read his thoughts,” says Church.
A major contribution to the play’s intimacy comes from the venue.
Performed in Harvey Theater, on the Interlochen campus, Macbeth will
take place on a three-quarters thrust stage, with the audience
situated on three of the four sides.
“This sort of proximity and intimacy really helps for this type of
production,” says Church. “For the set, itself, we’re collaborating
with sculptor Bill Allen.”

Allen—a local artist whose work has been featured at several venues,
including the Dennos Museum Center and the Michigan Legacy Art Park—is
known for his latest abstract and dark figures.
“I checked out his work and I was struck by how tormented, frightening
and disturbing the sculptures are,” says Church. “It really felt like
Allen has worked on several artistic collaborations; including his
work with poet Fleda Brown in the spring exhibit “ConTexTure,” at the
Dennos Museum Center.
“I enjoy using my art,” explains Allen. “I feel it expands the meaning
of my work.”
The sculptures exude the torment that Shakespeare’s main character
experiences throughout the play; but, this production of Macbeth is
more than just “double, double toil and trouble.”
“We’ve infused a sense of tenderness,” says Ginty, “between my
character and Lady Macbeth,” (played by alumna Caitlin
Ginty says Macbeth isn’t about a guy who’s crazy, but rather “a man who falls.”
One of the challenges for Ginty was telling his agent that he would
disappear into the Northern Michigan woods for several weeks.
“Theatre doesn’t pay the, uh, premiums that film and television do,’
he explains. “My agent asked me, ‘Why would you want to go to the
middle of nowhere for practically no money?’
“I said, ‘this is where I went to school.’
“His response was, ‘Great, give a lecture,’” Ginty laughs.
Church says all the alumni have been fully supportive of the production.
“There’s a lot of talent here,” says Church. “It’s a way to celebrate
Interlochen’s theater alumni. It also gives our faculty and staff a
way to keep up on their art.”
Church and Ginty believe everyone will be able to relate to the play –
whether it’s thrilling sword fights or the romanticism of the
Shakespearean world.
“It’s a great first-time Shakespeare experience,” says Ginty. “We want
people to leave this play saying, ‘Man, I really want that Shakespeare
guy to become a part of my life.”

The Third Annual Shakespeare Festival is happening now, July 1-11, at
Interlochen’s Harvey Theater. Tickets are $26 and are available at
tickets.interlochen.org or by calling the box office at 800-681-5920.
But, hurry – they’re going fast.

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