Letters

Letters 07-06-2015

Safety on the “Bridge to Nowhere” Grant Parsons wrote an articulate column in opposition to the proposed Traverse City pier at the mouth of the Boardman River. He cites issues such as limited access, lack of parking, increased congestion, environmental degradation, and pork barrel spending of tax dollars. I would add another to this list: public safety...

Vote Carefully A recent poll showed 84% of Michiganders support increasing Michigan’s renewable energy standard to at least 20% from the current 10%. Yet Representative Ray Franz has sponsored legislation to eliminate the standard. This out of touch position is reminiscent of Franz’s opposition to the Pure Michigan campaign and support for increased taxes on retirees....

Credit Where Credit Is Due I think you should do another article about the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund giving proper credit to all involved, not just Tom Washington. Many others were just as involved...

I’ve Changed My Mind The Supreme Court has determined that states cannot keep same-sex couples from marrying and must recognize their unions. This has happened with breathtaking suddenness. It took 246 years for Americans to decide that slavery was wrong and abolish it, but it’s been only a couple of decades since any successful attempt was made to legalize same-sex marriage, and four years since a majority of the American public supported legalization...


Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play: Squeeze, Sting, Autolux,...
. . . .

4Play: Squeeze, Sting, Autolux, David Gray

Kristi Kates - September 20th, 2010
Squeeze - Spot the Difference - XOXO Records
In a unique and remarkably fun album idea, talented singer-songwriters
Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook have taken a roster of old Squeeze
songs and have replicated them - with just a few minor changes (hence
the album title.) Some are easy to spot, such as Tilbrook subbing in
his own vocal for Paul Carrack on what is perhaps Squeeze’s best known
song, “Tempted”; but others are more subtle, such as different synth
patterns or instrument effects. The music is full of sass and energy,
and those deftly-written Squeeze songs are just as good as always.


Sting - Symphonicities - Deutsche Grammophon
Symphonicities serves as a companion, of sorts, to Sting’s world tour,
and features the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra interpreting the
songs of Sting and The Police. The album re-imagines Sting’s songs as
symphony arrangements, which actually showcases Sting’s exceptional
songwriting skills and nicely highlights the structures of the songs
themselves. “Every Little Things She Does Is Magic” takes on a magic
sound of its own with such rich instrumentation, while “When We Dance”
embellishes only slightly on the original; and “We Work the Black
Seam” introduces darkly effective horns.



Autolux - Transit Transit - TBD Records
L.A. band Autolux recorded their latest in their own studio, Space 23,
with the band’s own Greg Edwards serving as engineer. Vintage synths
and current electro-drum beats and loops co-exist nicely on tracks
like the predictably rhythmic “Census,” and the catchy “Supertoys” -
all three members of the band alternate through lead vocal duties, and
even throw some harmonies and horn and miniature piano sounds into the
mix. Interesting static and noises are filtered through to add even
more depth to this unique set.



David Gray - Foundling - Downtown
Singer-songwriter Gray, while not one of the best-known UK performers
in the U.S., has definitely been consistently putting out exceptional
albums that more singer-songwriter fans should hear. His latest, which
he worked on primarily on his own (instead of with his usual
bandmates), brings together his focused, warm vocals with his
descriptive lyric work, this time slightly more pared down than before
and with a more languid focus. “Gossamer Thread” sounds effortless in
its arrangement, “We Could Fall in Love...” removes the bass for a
more personal feel, and “Davy Jones’ Locker” offers up interesting
imagery and harmonies as well.

 
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