Letters

Letters 02-01-2016

Real Contamination In 1968, Chicago (its Mayor Richard Daley in particular) felt menaced by anti-war protesters (Abbie Hoffman in particular) threatening to put the hallucinogenic LSD into Chicago’s water supply. In reaction to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., we reacted vigorously to a perceived threat of chemical or biological terrorist attacks on our water supply. A religious cult contaminating a city water tank with salmonella in Oregon, sickening about 700, was the only such attack in our country until now. The water supply of Flint, Mich., was attacked and contaminated, not by terrorists or protesters, but by our own government...

Why The Muslim Debate? I was passing through your fine town last week and picked up a couple copies of Northern Express. There I noted a discourse concerning the Muslim situation in Dearborn. It is interesting to note that I see similar conversations in newspapers and blogs throughout the country and, in fact, throughout the world...

Kachadurian Has It All Wrong Thank you for continuing to publish Thomas Kachadurian’s bigoted editorials. If not for this publication, I wouldn’t know that such people lived in my sweet northern Michigan...

Over The Line I felt Sarah Palin crossed the line when she indicated our president did not care about those like her son who came home wounded. No one challenges her on these remarks; to me it is shameful...

Flints’ Man-made Disaster Governor Snyder’s Financial Emergency Manager Law has created a State of Emergency in Flint. In 2011, newly elected Governor Snyder signed Public Act 4, giving him the freedom to take over any city government his office found financially bankrupt, with power to override any decision of elected city officials. This law showed his primary motive — money before people. In November 2012, the People of Michigan voted down his Financial Emergency Manager Law, as they resented losing control of their cities. In December 2012, he showed his contempt for the people’s vote and signed a revised version, one that did not give power back to the people...

Defending the AR15 And Gun Rights I was amazed to read David Downer’s recent letter. He admits he is a gun owner but he expresses his ignorance of what an “assault rifle” really is, and thereby spreads the antigun position that an AR15 is an assault rifle...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Nifty at 90: Sue Garthe
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Nifty at 90: Sue Garthe

Anne Stanton - October 4th, 2010
Nifty at 90: In perfect health, Sue Garthe shares her surprising advice
By Anne Stanton
As the weather grows colder and the days a little shorter, Sue Garthe
offers this wisdom for getting old with your body intact. Go outside
and walk every single day -- no matter if the sun is shining or the
rain is pouring down in blinding sheets.
Garthe is out the door by 6 a.m., pulling on her tennis shoes a few
minutes after her alarm goes off. She missed walking only four days
this past winter, and that’s because black ice covered the streets.
Garthe just celebrated her 90th birthday in near perfect health—as far
as she knows. She never goes to the doctor for check-ups. For years,
her family had no health insurance, so she always took special care to
keep her weight down and to exercise. Now she has Medicare, but still
avoids doctors.
“They’ll just find something wrong with you and ask you to come in
again. My parents never saw a doctor and they lived to be 95.”
Garthe has been walking all her life, even while raising six children.
As a girl living outside of Cedar, she walked 5½ miles each way to
school, except for the coldest winter months when the school kids
would board with the Catholic nuns. It was a time when there was no
electricity, no furnace, no phones, and no cars.
“We had 13 kids and we ate what we could afford and what people gave
us. Most of it came off the farm, even the ground wheat. It’s the best
flour for pies and bread. We had fresh bread every day,” she said.
 Garthe, who now lives in Traverse City, still eats the same diet of
meat, potatoes, fruit and vegetables, along with homemade pies and
bread, all in small portions. For snacks? “Whatever goes with a
cocktail!”
Besides walking, Garthe cleans her extremely tidy two-story house,
hangs up her laundry on the clothesline, and plays golf every week,
weather permitting. “Use it or lose it, that’s my motto!”
She also enjoys a daily cocktail of vodka and orange juice and swing
dances at the Hayloft, where she allows herself two cocktails. Her
stress level is low, since she lives comfortably on Social Security
dividends. “When I was younger, we poured every extra dollar into
paying off the mortgage.”
Garthe’s husband died four years ago, but she has the constant company
of her adopted son, Peter, nearby family members, and several friends
who are a couple decades her junior. She used to go to church every
day, but now attends just once a week.
Does she still drive?
“Not since yesterday,” she quipped.

“I’M A FATALIST”
Garthe shrugs off stories of cancer survivors who credit their annual
mammograms, physicals and colonoscopies for detecting problems early
and allowing them to live decades longer.
“I’m a fatalist. I’m going to die when my day comes up,” she said.
If you press her on her health problems, she’s initially tight lipped
on the matter. “When people ask me how I am, I tell them, ‘I am.’ I
don’t have enough time to talk about my aches and pains.”
Seventy years ago, she almost died from double viral pneumonia and
spent three months in the hospital. Nowadays, she has an occasional
leg cramp and near constant pain in her hands from arthritis. She also
had some skin cancer on her face, which was removed, and cataract
surgery, which caused a hemorrhage in her left eye, resulting in a
periodic flare-up in one eye. She claims her eyesight gets better with
age. She takes absolutely no medicine, except for the occasional
Aleve. Her cure is to stay busy. “Hard work never killed anyone,” she
said. “If I take something for pain, it will just pop somewhere else.
I think everyone has to go through pain. I really do. I don’t think
about it, so it doesn’t hurt.”
Garthe has strong opinions on health care and laments that most
Americans would rather take a pill than take a walk.  With the
controversy raging these days about Medicare, she feels it’s time for
common sense. She was outraged to read a report last week that a new
$93,000 drug treatment only adds four months to the life of patients
with incurable prostate tumor. Medicare will cover the treatment cost.
She thinks the controversy over “death panels” should have sparked a
more serious discussion: how much money is spent to briefly extend the
life of someone with an incurable disease? Instead, the politicians
dodged the issue.
“I think it’s an outrage to use that money when it could go to help
someone in real  need,” she said.  “I think seniors are vote-getters.
All you hear about is health care for seniors. I say let them take
care of the kids first. There are so many of them who don’t go
walking. A lot are obese or heavy at least. A lot continue to smoke,
and complain that they should be able to smoke. It’s almost criminal
that the seniors’ favorite pastime is to keep doctor appointments.”
She waved toward the house across the street.
“The ambulance just took my neighbor twice to the hospital today. He
weighs 450 pounds.”

HELPING THE HOMELESS
Lest you think that Garthe is hard-hearted, you need only hear about
her walks where she strikes up conversations with homeless people, who
are often climbing out of sleeping bags about the same time walkers
and runners are getting out. She used to sit on a bench and talk to a
homeless man, who drove the Clinch Park train. She didn’t see him for
a few days, and learned that he was found dead on the beach of Lake
Michigan where he often slept.
“There was a Thanksgiving, about five years ago when my husband was
still alive, I was out walking. It was so cold and windy, and when I
got down a block or so, I met a man who asked me how to get to a
street in Williamsburg. He told me he’d been incarcerated since
August; he had on shorts, no cap, no gloves, no nothing, and they just
released him from jail, and he didn’t know where he was going.”
So Garthe took him home and gave him a cup of coffee, along with a
winter coat, hat, and gloves. Her husband, now deceased, also gave him
a ride home.
“That was the end of the story,” she said.
Garthe has a strong Catholic faith, and loves the opportunity of
helping someone in need. Years ago, she fed the hoboes that used to
come off the train near her house—there were so many who happened to
stop by, she felt there might be a secret mark on her door. She
recently met an Afghan mom and her two children at a bus stop. One
morning, the mom wasn’t there and her two kids, uneasy about being
alone, asked Garthe to wait for the bus with them.
Her biggest blessing is her 51-year-old adopted son, Peter Garthe.
Decades ago, already a young mother of five, she took in Peter, who
was nearly deaf and suffered from a serious heart condition. He didn’t
talk until the age of 5 and was eventually diagnosed with mild autism.
Now he is known in Traverse City as a statistical sports guru.  Each
year on her birthday, he writes a long heartfelt note of love and
thanks.
“I need him and he needs me. He’s what keeps me going,” she said.
Unfortunately, Peter does have health problems, most of them related
to a car accident and getting beat up one night as he walked home
after selling National Cherry Festival pins. He suffers from painful
headaches and was on his way last week to a … doctor’s appointment.
“When he keeps busy, they don’t bother him as much,” Garthe said,
smiling just before she climbed into her Subaru to drive away.

 
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