Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Features · Nifty at 90: Sue Garthe
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Nifty at 90: Sue Garthe

Anne Stanton - October 4th, 2010
Nifty at 90: In perfect health, Sue Garthe shares her surprising advice
By Anne Stanton
As the weather grows colder and the days a little shorter, Sue Garthe
offers this wisdom for getting old with your body intact. Go outside
and walk every single day -- no matter if the sun is shining or the
rain is pouring down in blinding sheets.
Garthe is out the door by 6 a.m., pulling on her tennis shoes a few
minutes after her alarm goes off. She missed walking only four days
this past winter, and that’s because black ice covered the streets.
Garthe just celebrated her 90th birthday in near perfect health—as far
as she knows. She never goes to the doctor for check-ups. For years,
her family had no health insurance, so she always took special care to
keep her weight down and to exercise. Now she has Medicare, but still
avoids doctors.
“They’ll just find something wrong with you and ask you to come in
again. My parents never saw a doctor and they lived to be 95.”
Garthe has been walking all her life, even while raising six children.
As a girl living outside of Cedar, she walked 5½ miles each way to
school, except for the coldest winter months when the school kids
would board with the Catholic nuns. It was a time when there was no
electricity, no furnace, no phones, and no cars.
“We had 13 kids and we ate what we could afford and what people gave
us. Most of it came off the farm, even the ground wheat. It’s the best
flour for pies and bread. We had fresh bread every day,” she said.
 Garthe, who now lives in Traverse City, still eats the same diet of
meat, potatoes, fruit and vegetables, along with homemade pies and
bread, all in small portions. For snacks? “Whatever goes with a
Besides walking, Garthe cleans her extremely tidy two-story house,
hangs up her laundry on the clothesline, and plays golf every week,
weather permitting. “Use it or lose it, that’s my motto!”
She also enjoys a daily cocktail of vodka and orange juice and swing
dances at the Hayloft, where she allows herself two cocktails. Her
stress level is low, since she lives comfortably on Social Security
dividends. “When I was younger, we poured every extra dollar into
paying off the mortgage.”
Garthe’s husband died four years ago, but she has the constant company
of her adopted son, Peter, nearby family members, and several friends
who are a couple decades her junior. She used to go to church every
day, but now attends just once a week.
Does she still drive?
“Not since yesterday,” she quipped.

Garthe shrugs off stories of cancer survivors who credit their annual
mammograms, physicals and colonoscopies for detecting problems early
and allowing them to live decades longer.
“I’m a fatalist. I’m going to die when my day comes up,” she said.
If you press her on her health problems, she’s initially tight lipped
on the matter. “When people ask me how I am, I tell them, ‘I am.’ I
don’t have enough time to talk about my aches and pains.”
Seventy years ago, she almost died from double viral pneumonia and
spent three months in the hospital. Nowadays, she has an occasional
leg cramp and near constant pain in her hands from arthritis. She also
had some skin cancer on her face, which was removed, and cataract
surgery, which caused a hemorrhage in her left eye, resulting in a
periodic flare-up in one eye. She claims her eyesight gets better with
age. She takes absolutely no medicine, except for the occasional
Aleve. Her cure is to stay busy. “Hard work never killed anyone,” she
said. “If I take something for pain, it will just pop somewhere else.
I think everyone has to go through pain. I really do. I don’t think
about it, so it doesn’t hurt.”
Garthe has strong opinions on health care and laments that most
Americans would rather take a pill than take a walk.  With the
controversy raging these days about Medicare, she feels it’s time for
common sense. She was outraged to read a report last week that a new
$93,000 drug treatment only adds four months to the life of patients
with incurable prostate tumor. Medicare will cover the treatment cost.
She thinks the controversy over “death panels” should have sparked a
more serious discussion: how much money is spent to briefly extend the
life of someone with an incurable disease? Instead, the politicians
dodged the issue.
“I think it’s an outrage to use that money when it could go to help
someone in real  need,” she said.  “I think seniors are vote-getters.
All you hear about is health care for seniors. I say let them take
care of the kids first. There are so many of them who don’t go
walking. A lot are obese or heavy at least. A lot continue to smoke,
and complain that they should be able to smoke. It’s almost criminal
that the seniors’ favorite pastime is to keep doctor appointments.”
She waved toward the house across the street.
“The ambulance just took my neighbor twice to the hospital today. He
weighs 450 pounds.”

Lest you think that Garthe is hard-hearted, you need only hear about
her walks where she strikes up conversations with homeless people, who
are often climbing out of sleeping bags about the same time walkers
and runners are getting out. She used to sit on a bench and talk to a
homeless man, who drove the Clinch Park train. She didn’t see him for
a few days, and learned that he was found dead on the beach of Lake
Michigan where he often slept.
“There was a Thanksgiving, about five years ago when my husband was
still alive, I was out walking. It was so cold and windy, and when I
got down a block or so, I met a man who asked me how to get to a
street in Williamsburg. He told me he’d been incarcerated since
August; he had on shorts, no cap, no gloves, no nothing, and they just
released him from jail, and he didn’t know where he was going.”
So Garthe took him home and gave him a cup of coffee, along with a
winter coat, hat, and gloves. Her husband, now deceased, also gave him
a ride home.
“That was the end of the story,” she said.
Garthe has a strong Catholic faith, and loves the opportunity of
helping someone in need. Years ago, she fed the hoboes that used to
come off the train near her house—there were so many who happened to
stop by, she felt there might be a secret mark on her door. She
recently met an Afghan mom and her two children at a bus stop. One
morning, the mom wasn’t there and her two kids, uneasy about being
alone, asked Garthe to wait for the bus with them.
Her biggest blessing is her 51-year-old adopted son, Peter Garthe.
Decades ago, already a young mother of five, she took in Peter, who
was nearly deaf and suffered from a serious heart condition. He didn’t
talk until the age of 5 and was eventually diagnosed with mild autism.
Now he is known in Traverse City as a statistical sports guru.  Each
year on her birthday, he writes a long heartfelt note of love and
“I need him and he needs me. He’s what keeps me going,” she said.
Unfortunately, Peter does have health problems, most of them related
to a car accident and getting beat up one night as he walked home
after selling National Cherry Festival pins. He suffers from painful
headaches and was on his way last week to a … doctor’s appointment.
“When he keeps busy, they don’t bother him as much,” Garthe said,
smiling just before she climbed into her Subaru to drive away.

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