Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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TC: A beacon of light for medical marijuana patients

Bob Heflin - October 18th, 2010
TC: a beacon of light for medical marijuana patients
By Bob Heflin
The Northern Express recently ran a story about a “climate of fear”
among area medical marijuana patients. After speaking to local
authorities, the Traverse City Compassion Club learned that medical
marijuana is not a high police priority at this time in Grand Traverse
County, although recent arrests do include a patient growing over
their limits, and someone growing without patient certification.
Our club recommends that patients prevent arrest by learning about the
limits of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act and the Traverse City
Medical Marijuana Ordinance.
We consider ourselves lucky. Many communities in Michigan are
struggling with implementation of this new law. Some communities have
chosen to take an adversarial relationship with their local medical
marijuana community.
In 2004, Traverse City was one of five cities in Michigan which passed
an initiative for medical marijuana to be the lowest police priority.
With this in mind, Traverse City leaders decided to take a different
approach to the development of a local ordinance. Shortly after a
moratorium was placed on new marijuana businesses, Russ Soyring, TC
Planning Director, invited a group of medical marijuana patients and
caregivers to help draft the city’s new ordinance. For months,
patients negotiated with city leaders to craft a document which would
eliminate some of the ambiguity of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act,
thereby reducing the risk of more patient arrests in the future, while
ensuring that local medical marijuana patients would have access to
safe, quality medicine.
Growing limits are set by state law but the TC Ordinance does add
several “good neighbor” restrictions on growers residing in the city.
The commercial zone section of the ordinance allows a patient
collective to offer a private group meeting restricted to certified
patients. Private patient meetings, with a security guard at the door
checking patient certification, ensure that medical cannabis will be
restricted to the local certified patient population. Patients
leaving or entering the private meeting may not possess more than
their legal limit. No money or cannabis is left in the building
overnight.
These meetings encourage the development of a local, sustainable
supply of medicine for patients -- one not dependent on the black
market or the druglords in Mexico. It keeps medical cannabis out of
the hands of kids and the public.
Finally, private patient meetings reduce the incentive for others to
continue to operate a storefront dispensary in competition to a
private patient meeting because overhead and other expenses are
incorporated into dispensary pricing. Dispensaries are typically
50-75% more expensive than private patient meetings.
At our last TC Compassion Club private meeting, patients offered 17
different strains of high-quality cannabis, 50-75% cheaper than
dispensary prices, and a greater proportion of the compensation goes
to a local patient/caregiver who is then able to grow more medicine.
Donations and vender fees pay to lease the club meeting space.
Currently the Traverse City Compassion Club holds private patient
meetings at Crema, the downtown coffee shop at 300 Front St., on
Monday and Thursday nights from 6-9 p.m. Certified patients are
welcome to attend.

Bob Heflin, a founding board member of the Michigan Medical Marijuana
Association and past president of the
Traverse City Compassion Club, has worked professionally in criminal
justice, mental health, and addictions counseling.

 
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