Letters

Letters 11-28-2016

Trump should avoid self-dealing President-elect Donald Trump plans to turn over running of The Trump Organization to his children, who are also involved in the transition and will probably be informal advisers during his administration. This is not a “blind trust.” In this scenario Trump and family could make decisions based on what’s best for them rather than what’s best for the country...

Trump the change we need?  I have had a couple of weeks to digest the results of this election and reflect. There is no way the selection of Trump as POTUS could ever come close to being normal. It is not normal to have a president-elect settle a fraud case for millions a couple of months before the inauguration. It is not normal to have racists considered for cabinet posts. It is not normal for a president-elect tweet outrageous comments on his Twitter feed to respond to supposed insults at all hours of the early morning...

Health care system should benefit all It is no secret that the health insurance situation in our country is controversial. Some say the Affordable Care Act is “the most terrible thing that has happened to our country in years”; others are thrilled that, “for the first time in years I can get and afford health insurance.” Those who have not been closely involved in the medical field cannot be expected to understand how precarious the previous medical insurance structure was...

Christmas tradition needs change The Christmas light we need most is the divine, and to receive it we do not need electricity, probably only prayers and good deeds. But not everyone has this understanding, as we see in the energy waste that follows with the Christmas decorations...

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS 

A story in last week’s edition about parasailing businesses on East Grand Traverse Bay mistakenly described Grand Traverse Parasail as a business that is affiliated with the ParkShore Resort. It operates from a beach club two doors down from the resort. The story also should have noted that prior to the filing of a civil lawsuit in federal court by Saburi Boyer and Traverse Bay Parasail against Bryan Punturo and the ParkShore Resort, a similar lawsuit was dismissed from 13th Circuit Court in Traverse City upon a motion from the defendant’s attorney. Express regrets the error and omission.

A story in last week’s edition about The Fillmore restaurant in Manistee misstated Jacob Slonecki’s job at Arcadia Bluffs Golf Course. He was a cook. Express regrets the error.

Home · Articles · News · Music · Sevendust
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Sevendust

Kristi Kates - October 18th, 2010
Sevendust Searches for its Soul
By Kristi Kates
Beautiful fall colors, a short drive - and some impressively aggressive rock music - are all great reasons to head up to Sault Ste. Marie for the evening on October 19. Especially if you’re a fan of Georgia-based band Sevendust.
Just don’t try to pigeonhole them - the band themselves aren’t even sure where to place their sound within the alt-rock genre, according to Sevendust guitarist John Connolly.
“I don’t know - I’ve been trying to figure that out,” he said in a recent interview, “people, for five minutes, called us progressive, and then it was nu-metal. Then, all of a sudden, we were playing alternative metal. We are some kind of heavy, and some kind of rock, and some kind of metal.”

SNAKES TO SEVENDUST
Teaming up with Lajon Witherspoon on vocals, Clint Lowery on guitar, Vincent Hornsby on bass, and Morgan Rose on drums, Connolly and his band went through a number of name changes before settling on the Sevendust moniker, which is, interestingly, also the name of an insecticide and a computer virus.
Formed in 1994, the band was initially called Snake Nation; when they added Lowery on guitar, they renamed themselves Rumblefish. After running into another band called Rumblefish, they re-dubbed themselves Crawlspace, releasing the track “My Ruin” on the Mortal Kombat soundtrack album - and yes, you guessed it, it wasn’t long before another band called Crawlspace surfaced and wanted the band to pay them for the rights to the Crawlspace name.
So Sevendust it was.

MEMORY TO TODAY
Sevendust’s eponymous debut hit stores in 1997, and the band quickly became known for their forceful, heavy vocals, dark guitars, and bombastic beats. Fans of prog-rock/nu-metal/alt-metal — whichever you’d like to call it — were quickly won over, and Sevendust snagged a spot on the Billboard charts, where it remained for four months.
Over a dozen years later, the band found themselves in Chicago recording their latest set, Cold Day Memory, during which they chose to keep fans involved in the process.
Even during the remarkably busy sessions, Sevendust posted regular videos both on their own website and their YouTube channel, giving behind-the-scene looks at the recording process and making them feel
like part of the project.
And now arriving full-circle, Sevendust are following up Cold Day Memory with a special re-release of that first album from 1997 - now titled Sevendust: Definitive Edition, the re-release will include five new songs, and brings this ambitious band back to where they began, while their current tour will be bringing them to Michigan, too.

Sevendust will be appearing live in the Dream Makers Theater at the Kewadin Casino in Sault Ste. Marie on October 19. Tix are $28.50 and are available online at www.kewadin.com, or via the Kewadin box office
at 1-800-KEWADIN (539-2346.)


 
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