Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Book Roundup
. . . .

Book Roundup

Elizabeth Buzzelli - June 28th, 2010
Book Roundup: Local authors bring out their best
By Elizabeth Buzzelli
It seems as though almost every cottage stuck back in the Northern woods harbors a writer, toiling away at a memoir, a novel, short stories, anything that can be written. I find this an exciting occurrence. I was once told it is due to the confluence, the commingling of Lake Michigan and Lake Erie, with even a bit of Lake Superior thrown in, that has brought this burst of creativity to our area.
Since the lakes have been here for awhile, I don’t think that’s the real answer. Personally, I would opt for the laptop — which goes anywhere, works as long as there is electricity, and stores mountains of files. And then, of course, we have all these creative types fleeing to the woods where the biggest distraction might be a noisy woodpecker. Whatever the cause, there are lots of new ideas, new voices, writers’ groups, events and conferences. So, on to new books, writer appearances, and even one intriguing contest open to everyone.
Crossings -- Crooked Tree Arts Center in Petoskey (www.crookedtree.org) is running a contest with $5,000 going to one lucky participant. The event, a fundraiser for the Crooked Tree Arts Center and the Charlevoix Area Hospital Foundation, is based on “Crossings,” a book by local author, Patti Aikin, which ends with a mystery readers are challenged to solve through clues planted in the pictures in the book and in the text. Each book, purchased through the arts center or at local bookstores, contains a raffle ticket to be returned with a guess at the solution to the mystery.
On August 1, all of the right answers will become part of a drawing for the $5000 prize with the money raised through book sales being divided between the organizations involved. “Crossings” may be purchased online or at the Arts Center at 461 E. Mitchell, Petoskey, at McLean and Eakin Books, Round Lake Books in Charlevoix, or Local Flavor in Boyne City. The book prize is sponsored by the Bank of Northern Michigan and the Charlevoix State Bank. For more information contact the arts center at 231-347-4337.

Family at Booknook -- A new novel by an Ann Arbor writer, Brenda Humphrey Meisels, includes a scene on the Pine River in Northern Michigan. “Family at Booknook” is a first novel that begins in 1959, when Sparrow, a pregnant 16-year-old, begins to feel at home in the quiet corners of Booknook, a local bookstore. The baby grows as Sparrow and Dave, the bookstore owner, become friends, bringing both Dave and his shop back to life.
The book follows Finch, the baby, as she grows and begins to search for her real father, causing Sparrow, her mother, to examine her own life and choices.
Meisel’s home, outside Ann Arbor, is near a wooded area where she and her family watch birds, giving her the names for her main characters.
She will be signing books at Horizon Books in Traverse City and Horizon Books in Cadillac on July 17.

A Good High Place -- From Northern Illinois University Press comes a novel set in Elk Rapids. “A Good High Place” by L.E. Kimball, takes place during the years before Would War I, and continues over the next five decades. It begins with Luella’s suspicion that her supposedly deceased younger sister is being raised by the family of her friend, Kachina. Kachina, a Native American woman, is blessed with a healing touch. Her goal is to help her family resist being absorbed by white culture. What comes of Luella’s suspicions generates an unlikely friendship that brings up more questions than answers. Lynn Kimball lives on a trout stream in the Upper Peninsula.

Elizabeth Buzzelli’s latest best selling mystery, “Dead Sleeping Shaman,” is available in bookstores everywhere.




 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close