Letters

Letters 08-03-2015

Real Brownfields Deserve Dollars I read with interest the story on Brownfield development dollars in the July 20 issue. I applaud Dan Lathrop and other county commissioners who voted “No” on the Randolph Street project...

Hopping Mad Carlin Smith is hopping mad (“Will You Get Mad With Me?” 7-20-15). Somebody filed a fraudulent return using his identity, and he’s not alone. The AP estimates the government “pays more than $5 billion annually in fraudulent tax refunds.” Well, many of us have been hopping mad for years. This is because the number one tool Congress has used to fix this problem has been to cut the IRS budget –by $1.2 billion in the last 5 years...

Just Grumbling, No Solutions Mark Pontoni’s grumblings [recent Northern Express column] tell us much about him and virtually nothing about those he chooses to denigrate. We do learn that Pontoni may be the perfect political candidate. He’s arrogant, opinionated and obviously dimwitted...

A Racist Symbol I have to respond to Gordon Lee Dean’s letter claiming that the confederate battle flag is just a symbol of southern heritage and should not be banned from state displays. The heritage it represents was the treasonous effort to continue slavery by seceding from a democratic nation unwilling to maintain such a consummate evil...

Not So Thanks I would like to thank the individual who ran into and knocked over my Triumph motorcycle while it was parked at Lowe’s in TC on Friday the 24th. The $3,000 worth of damage was greatly appreciated. The big dent in the gas tank under the completely destroyed chrome badge was an especially nice touch...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · It‘s the...
. . . .

It‘s the berries...

Robert Downes - July 5th, 2010
It’s the berries...
What do people do when times get tough? They hold big parties and try
to fuggedaboudit for awhile.
It’s a global impulse: in Rio de Janeiro, where millions live in dire
poverty, slum-dwellers who may not even have electricity or running
water spend the entire year working on parade costumes and floats for
their annual Carnival.
The same community spirit holds true for the National Cherry Festival,
which brings out hundreds of volunteers who contribute more than
35,000 hours of their time to host an
8-day party for more than 500,000 people. This is on top of 10,000
hours of professional staff time: Cherry Festival staffers Tim
Hinkley, Susan Wilcox Olson, Trevor Tkach, Karen Siekas, Stephanie
Neville, Chuck O’Connor, Mandy DePuy, Jennifer Parlette, Erika Olsen
and Emily LaFollette get the ball rolling on 150 events, based out of
a small suite of offices in downtown Traverse City.
This is the 84th outing for the Cherry Festival, which got its start
in 1926 as a harvest celebration for the cherry crop. It’s been a bit
of a bum season for the cherry crop this year, owing to a hard frost
which split the budding fruit this spring. On the other hand, the
remaining cherries came early this year, so we’ll have something of
the spirit of 1926 with our own local fruit to savor, instead of the
imported stuff.
Some people have groused in recent years that the Festival has grown
“too corporate” with sponsorships. But the good news is that 85% of
festival events are still free of charge, and that’s a fine thing in
this economy, especially for cash-strapped families who are looking to
catch a break at a time when even a bucket of movie popcorn runs $5 or
more.
Last week was filled with somber news: the gusher in the Gulf pounded
out another 700,000 barrels of oil and the stock market fell something
like 400 points. Republicans shot down an extension of unemployment
benefits, leaving an extra 200,000 people per week dangling without a
safety net, on top of 1 million whose benefits have already expired.
The Asian Carp splashed its way to within five miles of Lake Michigan.
Unemployment is reportedly up to 19% in Benzie County and other
pockets of Northern Michigan. And there was the usual creepy stuff in
the news about child molesters, break-ins, druggers, muggers and other
bummers.
In short, we could use a break from the status quo, and lo and
behold, here ‘tis. This week, hundreds of thousands of us will line
the bay to watch the fireworks and the Blue Angels; camp out on Front
Street for hours of parades; party with our friends at the Open Space
and its Bayside Music Stage; and enjoy the simple sensation of walking
to town with our kids, if only to avoid the traffic. People from all
over the country will be here, enjoying one of the Top 10 Festivals in
the United States. And the good news is that every small town in
Northern Michigan has its own version of the Cherry Festival as the
summer unfolds. As the saying goes, it’s the berries. See you
downtown.

 
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