Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

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. . . .

It‘s the berries...

Robert Downes - July 5th, 2010
It’s the berries...
What do people do when times get tough? They hold big parties and try
to fuggedaboudit for awhile.
It’s a global impulse: in Rio de Janeiro, where millions live in dire
poverty, slum-dwellers who may not even have electricity or running
water spend the entire year working on parade costumes and floats for
their annual Carnival.
The same community spirit holds true for the National Cherry Festival,
which brings out hundreds of volunteers who contribute more than
35,000 hours of their time to host an
8-day party for more than 500,000 people. This is on top of 10,000
hours of professional staff time: Cherry Festival staffers Tim
Hinkley, Susan Wilcox Olson, Trevor Tkach, Karen Siekas, Stephanie
Neville, Chuck O’Connor, Mandy DePuy, Jennifer Parlette, Erika Olsen
and Emily LaFollette get the ball rolling on 150 events, based out of
a small suite of offices in downtown Traverse City.
This is the 84th outing for the Cherry Festival, which got its start
in 1926 as a harvest celebration for the cherry crop. It’s been a bit
of a bum season for the cherry crop this year, owing to a hard frost
which split the budding fruit this spring. On the other hand, the
remaining cherries came early this year, so we’ll have something of
the spirit of 1926 with our own local fruit to savor, instead of the
imported stuff.
Some people have groused in recent years that the Festival has grown
“too corporate” with sponsorships. But the good news is that 85% of
festival events are still free of charge, and that’s a fine thing in
this economy, especially for cash-strapped families who are looking to
catch a break at a time when even a bucket of movie popcorn runs $5 or
Last week was filled with somber news: the gusher in the Gulf pounded
out another 700,000 barrels of oil and the stock market fell something
like 400 points. Republicans shot down an extension of unemployment
benefits, leaving an extra 200,000 people per week dangling without a
safety net, on top of 1 million whose benefits have already expired.
The Asian Carp splashed its way to within five miles of Lake Michigan.
Unemployment is reportedly up to 19% in Benzie County and other
pockets of Northern Michigan. And there was the usual creepy stuff in
the news about child molesters, break-ins, druggers, muggers and other
In short, we could use a break from the status quo, and lo and
behold, here ‘tis. This week, hundreds of thousands of us will line
the bay to watch the fireworks and the Blue Angels; camp out on Front
Street for hours of parades; party with our friends at the Open Space
and its Bayside Music Stage; and enjoy the simple sensation of walking
to town with our kids, if only to avoid the traffic. People from all
over the country will be here, enjoying one of the Top 10 Festivals in
the United States. And the good news is that every small town in
Northern Michigan has its own version of the Cherry Festival as the
summer unfolds. As the saying goes, it’s the berries. See you

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