Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Repeat business
. . . .

Repeat business

Erin Cowell - July 5th, 2010
Repeat Business: Everything old is new again for 3 recycling entrepreneurs
By Erin Crowell
Call it the economy, call it sentiment – whatever the reason,
businesses are growing in the consignment and antiques industry.
Whether it’s a great discount price or a great story, businesses are
offering items from musical instruments to collectables, the practical
to the impractical.
The Express talked with a few Traverse City locals in the
“re-business,” to find out what people are looking to buy…again.

ZAMAR GUITAR
Dave Eickenroth, owner of Zamar Guitar in downtown Traverse City, has
been in the music business for nearly 40 years – including founder of
The Rainmakers, TC’s first rock and roll band, which started in the
1960s.
While he still performs today, Eickenroth has put considerable time
and effort into the used guitar and merchandise sales store, recently
re-located to East Front Street.
“We needed a space with pretty high ceilings for hanging two rows of
guitars,” says Eickenroth. “We also wanted to get into a high-traffic
area.”
Since the store’s relocation in May, business has been good.
“It’s like coming out of the desert into the promise land,” says
Eickenroth, who also serves as a worship leader in his church.
Zamar Guitar offers everything from the old and acoustic guitars to
the new and electric axes. You’ll also find new and used banjos,
along with accessories and sound equipment.
“We have a 5-string American Made signed by Abraham Laboriel… a Hot
Rod ’57 Fender Stratocaster… an ‘80s Japanese version of a ‘60-Strat,”
Eickenroth lists. “It has what we call ‘mojo.’”
Used guitars sell anywhere from $100 to $2,000.
“Right now, I have a gentleman from England who is looking at an
$1,800 guitar,” says Eickenroth.
Zamar Guitar aims for a selling price that is good for the seller,
customer, as well as the company, with 25% going to Zamar. “It can be
a back and forth process,” he says.
One major reason people are buying used guitars is because of history.
“A lot of people go that route because there’s a story behind the
guitar.”
Don’t know how to play? The business also offers lessons from local
instructors including Angelo Meli, Greg Seaman and Eickenroth.
Zamar Guitar is located at 322 E. Front St. in downtown Traverse City.
Hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; and Saturday, 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Call them at 929-0097 or find them online at
zamarguitarinc.com.

SOUND IT OUT RECORDS
Also in the music industry is Sound It Out Records – which has also
moved to a new location in Old Town.
Sound It Out sells everything from CDs to LPs, with an emphasis in
vinyl – the store’s hottest-selling item.
“People are going back to listening to records,” says owner Aaron
Gooch. “I don’t want to say digital music is soulless, but it’s not
physical like listening to a record. With digital you can plug in a
playlist on your iPod. With a record, you have to sit down and listen…
it’s a much more intimate experience.”
Recently, artists have been releasing songs on vinyl – which
contributes to some of Sound It Out’s stock. However, used records
prove to be the dominant item on the shelves.
“We have everything from The Doors to The Carpenters to the Beatles.
We’ve been getting a lot of Beatles albums lately, which is great
because people will always buy them,” says Gooch.
Prices range anywhere from a few cents to a few bucks for purchase.
While Sound It Out regularly gets consignment CDs, LPs and records,
generally the payout is low.
“But, many people are just grateful to not have to throw out their old
records,” explains Gooch. “Sometimes they’ll even do it on trade.”
Gooch opened Sound It Out in 2007, along with several friends and
boyfriend Kyle Weeks.
“We actually bought the store—it was called Vinyl D&D Records—from an
acquaintance because he was moving. We totally remodeled and bulked up
the inventory, and changed the name obviously, before we reopened it,”
says Gooch.
Gooch says New Moon Records of Traverse City was a major influence in
purchasing her own records store.
“I spent a lot of time as a teenager (there),” she says.
Sound It Out Records is located at 418 S. Union St. in Traverse City.
They’re open Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m-8 p.m. Call 922-1599 or visit
them online at sounditoutrecords.com.


CHERRYLAND ANTIQUE MALL & CONSIGNMENT CENTER
What do you do with an abandoned shopping plaza? Recycle it into an
antiques mall.
In May, Adair Correll and his business partner Doug Burkhead, moved
into a 15,000-square-foot space across from the Cherryland Mall in TC
to launch the Cherryland Antique Mall & Consignment Center. The
business offers everything from furniture and household items to pipe
collections, wood ducks and antique gas pumps.
“I felt there was a need to open this place,” says Correll. “Antiques
are growing in popularity.”
“So far, the comments have been very positive,” adds Burkhead.
The name for Cherryland Antique Mall is fitting, considering the
business rents out 72 display cases and 88 booths to collectors near
and far. Each booth and case has its own unique collection of goodies.
“We’re somewhat selective. The antiques have to be at least 25 years
old,” says Correll. “Also, we keep nothing. What (the collectors)
sell, they keep.”
While most antique stores maintain a dark, musty odor about them —
it’s common, seeing as most items are decades old — Cherryland’s space
is wide open, bright and “airy.”
“It’s one of our biggest compliments,” says Burkhead.
When the two started the project back in October, collectors were
already signing leases.
“We have people selling their stuff from places like Cadillac,
Charlevoix, Grand Rapids and Detroit,” says Correll. “Many of them
travel to places like Florida for estate sales and bring the items
back with them to Michigan where we display them here.”
“It’s amazing what people collect,” adds Burkhead.
Some of Cherryland’s stock includes items such as an old turntable
rack for sewing thread, a 1946 Wurlitzer Jukebox (which sells for
$11,000) and an old gas station pump.
Nostalgia is one thing that always comes up with customers, says Correll.
“Oh, we always have people commenting on certain items saying, ‘I
remember when my grandparents had one of those,’” he laughs.
While the big draw is antique items, Cherryland also offers
consignment furniture – which is currently still in the development
process. The business duo plan to fill a 2,000 square foot space soon.
“People are already asking what they can bring in for that space,”
says Burkhead.

Cherryland Antique Mall & Consignment Center is located at 1719 South
Garfield Rd., across from the Cherryland Mall. They are open
Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Call 944-1980
or go to cherrylandantiquemall.com.

 
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