Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · Job #1: downsizing...
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Job #1: downsizing Lansing

Robert Downes - November 8th, 2010
Job #1: downsizing Lansing
There was an odd moment on TV 7&4 News last week that indicated where
we might be headed now that the balance of power has shifted in
government.
Greg MacMaster, who ran for office on a pledge to downsize state
government, said in an interview that he has 13 new bills in mind for
his role as the new State Rep for the 105th District.
Congratulations to Greg on his win and for representing the citizens
of Antrim County. We assume that some of his bills will be aimed at
downsizing state government.
But still, 13 new bills sounds a bit much. If all 110 State Reps and
38 State Senators show up in Lansing with similar baggage... well,
you get the picture:
More government.
Or, as a popular saying in Asia goes: “Same, same, but different.”
It makes you wonder, did Michigan really need the 6,000-plus bills and
resolutions which went through the State House and Senate last year?
During this tide of anti-government fervor, wouldn’t this seem a good
time for our lawmakers to sit on their hands for a bit and resist the
urge to be, well, lawmakers?
One might argue that we could do without 75% of the bills and
resolutions introduced in Lansing and be better off for it. You can
see for yourself what our legislature is up to at
www.legislature.mi.gov. Last Wednesday, Nov. 3, for instance, there
were 37 bills and resolution in the works, including declarations of
November as Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month, along Lung Cancer
Month and Diabetes Awareness and Blood Glucose Control Month. Then
there were separate resolutions of tribute for the Honorable Deborah
Cherry and the Honorable Stevens T. Mason, and so on.
It’s nice to know that our legislators are giving a passing thought to
pancreatic cancer, lung cancer and glucose control, and that a couple
of judges are getting a scrap of paper suitable for framing to hang on
their walls.
But does Michigan really need to pay 148 lawmakers salaries of close
to $80,000 per year to fiddle around with this kind of busy-work
during such dire times? Cops and teachers are being laid off, and
kids are being denied art education and phys-ed in our schools. What
are our priorities?
We have far too many conflicting, outdated and unnecessary laws on the
books and don‘t need a raft of new ones if Michigan is going to move
forward.
As Rick Coates notes in this issue on the controversy over bringing
your own wine to restaurants, there’s such a thicket of conflicting,
contradictory laws regarding this issue that neither the cops or local
restaurants seems to know which law has precedence. Some local
restaurants report that they are being driven out of business because
customers can no longer enjoy a local vintage with dinner.
Locally, some day care providers are also grappling with updated rules
from the Department of Human Service’s Bureau of Children and Adult
Licensing.
Obviously, kids must be protected in day cares, but is it really
necessary to require providers to post “Exit” signs on their windows
in case of an emergency? It seems unlikely that adults would need to
search for an exit sign in their own home.
One could also argue the wisdom of requiring “No Smoking” signs in the
homes of day care providers, since that seems a bit of a no-brainer.
Or the requirement that one must report anyone in the day care
household who is involved in “breaking and entering into a tent, boat
or railroad car...”
Michigan Capitol Confidential, a publication of the Mackinac Center,
posts some of the absurd laws proposed by our legislature. Their fall
issue lists these gems:
• Senate Bill 1441 would “Allow Spartan stores (but not competitors)
to hold wine tastings.”
• House Bill 6311 would “Impose regulations on amateur mixed marital
arts competitors,” with the addition of license fees, of course.
• House Bill 5305 would increase the cost of a marriage license from
$20 to $40, with $10 of that amount going to government-funded “family
counseling services.”
Consider that Michigan, with its rapidly shrinking population base, is
one of only 11 states that have full-time legislatures. Maybe it’s
too much to ask in a situation where the foxes are guarding the
henhouse, but isn’t this revolutionary time of downsizing government
an ideal opportunity to pass a bill that would provide Michigan with a
part-time legislature? There are 17 U.S. states whose legislators meet
on a half-time basis. Why not Michigan?

 
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