Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · The Buy Local Movement
. . . .

The Buy Local Movement

Robert Downes - December 6th, 2010
The Buy Local Movement
In some ways, the early ’90s were a scarier time for downtowns in
Northern Michigan than what we face today in the “Great Recession.”
Nearly 20 years ago, we interviewed Bryan Crough, executive director
of the Downtown Development Authority about the future of downtown
Traverse City. At the time, America was undergoing the recession of
1991-’92. Merchants and restaurateurs in Northern Michigan were also
threatened by an invasion of chain stores and eateries.
Back then, there were plans to build the Grand Traverse Mall south of
town; an outlet mall was also in the works; and there were empty
storefronts downtown, similar to those popping up all over America.
WalMart and the ‘big box’ retailers were sucking Main Streets dry
across the country.
Would downtown survive, we asked Bryan? How could it with all of the
mammoth chain stores moving to the area? He expressed confidence,
despite the gloomy outlook.
Crough called it right: today most downtowns in Northern Michigan are
thriving. In TC, the shopping and dining action runs well after dark,
with downtown streets filled with people strolling throughout the
evening.
Despite gaining a beachhead here, several big box stores have come and
gone through the years (Circuit City, Eastern Mountain Sports) along
with a number of chain stores (remember Hudson’s? Prange’s?). And
today, TC’s outlet mall is practically a ghost town.
What happened? Us. The “buy local” movement had its fans long before
that phrase went viral. Many of us chose to vote with our dollars to
support our downtowns.
Our downtowns also responded with makeovers: hardware stores and other
small town institutions moved on, replaced by boutiques, upscale
restaurants and ethnic dining options. Street fairs and gallery walks
were established, and theaters in Frankfort, Elk Rapids and TC got
makeovers. ‘Downtown’ quickly became the fun place to be.
These days, “buy local” is a rallying cry for those who recognize that
you‘ve got to use it or lose it if you want to live in a healthy, fun
community. It’s in sync with the “local foods” movement, which has
been a godsend for area farms, farm markets and independent
restaurants.
Recently, a “Shop Your Community Day” raised $23,000 in donations for
local nonprofits in Traverse City, with 15% of sales donated to the
customer’s favorite charity.
What the “buy local” and “local foods” movements have in common is
quality that lasts, along with the personal touch, the smile, and the
eye contact that make you feel welcome. You may pay a little more at
times, but that’s a small price for enriching your life and your home
town.

***

Then there’s the Internet and the growing push from the mainstream
media to do your shopping online.
I like this comment from a Facebook friend who noted that you shop
online on Cyber Monday, get your stuff on Tuesday, send it back in the
mail because it’s not right on Wednesday, and go downtown to buy it in
person on Thursday...
Last week, one of our local broadcasters was on the air suggesting
various websites for holiday shopping: It made me think: honey, don’t
you know you’re putting yourself out of a job when you don’t ‘buy
local’? Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but soon and for the
rest of your life...
According to an outfit called the Michigan Main Street Center, $68 of
every $100 you spend at a local business stays in your community.
That compares to $43 for every $100 you spend at a chain store or
non-local business.
That means that when you buy gifts off the Internet, you’re sending
your home town a lump of coal for Christmas.

***

Add to that, how do you buy gifts of music and books in the age of
digital downloads?
I used to enjoy buying CDs for presents, but we’ve moved on to
downloading iTunes, which falls flat in the gift-giving department.
And how do you make a gift of a digital book for the person on your
list who owns an e-reader?
Perhaps an empty box with a note inside: “Look for the new Shakira
album in your iTunes.”
Not much fun in that.

 
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