Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Features · The future of farming
. . . .

The future of farming

Anne Stanton - December 13th, 2010
The Future of Farming:Small dairy farms struggle to survive as factory farms move in
By Anne Stanton
A drive down a quiet paved road outside of Mesick reveals a contrast
in the old and the new: Old McDonald’s versus Factory Farming.
At one end of West Four Road is farmer Mike Hampel’s place. About 50
cattle stand among neat rows of stumpy brown cornstalks. A few gaze
curiously as a lone car passes by. Inside a large shed are tools and
several vehicles in the midst of repair. Two white stray cats,
powdered with dust, are newcomers to the farm, sleeping away the day
in the back of an old car.
A half-mile down the road is what’s called a “confined animal feeding
operation” (CAFO) with rows and rows of large black and white Holstein
heifers munching grain, their heads poking through black metal bars.
More cows are inside one of the property’s many barns, either eating
or lying down on the dirt floor. Despite the negative reputation of
CAFO, these animals have room to walk around in the barn and spend
time outdoors.
Hampel said the strong manure smell emanating periodically from the
CAFO doesn’t bother him. This is farm country, after all. The barns’
dirt floors are kept clean of manure, in part, because much of it goes
through floor slats and into a pit where it liquefies into a slurry.
The manure is sprayed as fertilizer onto fallow fields where corn and
hay are planted for the cows—about 120,000 pounds each day, an
estimate based on United States Department of Agriculture statistics.
The question is this: does the Mesick CAFO bode more for the same in this area?

The CAFO has actually been in Mesick for quite some time, with local
farmer Butch Broad gradually expanding his farm into an industrialized
operation. About three years ago, a downstate corporation bought the
farm. The new owner, Mike Geerlings, replaced the beef herd with about
1,000 black and white heifers (young females) that he raises for
transfer to his dairy CAFOs downstate.
The corporation is Scenic View Dairy Northern Beef and Grain, which
owns three downstate dairy CAFOs, cited multiple times by the Food and
Drug Administration for the illegal presence of antibiotics in dairy
cows that were slaughtered and intended for human consumption.
There are a total of 230 CAFOs in the State of Michigan and they tend
to cluster together.  They’ve only edged into Northern Michigan with
six industrialized swine farms and a heifer CAFO near Ludington in
Mason County. In McBain, a small town west of Cadillac, there are five
dairy CAFOs; one with the name of Many Blessings Dairy. They were
drawn to the area with the promise of an ethanol plant in McBain,
which would have produced a plentiful and cheap corn byproduct for
cattle to eat. The plant never materialized, but the CAFOs did.
Mike Hampel doesn’t know if more CAFOs will move into the Grand
Traverse region, but he does know that profit margins are thin and
driving small dairy farms out of business. He makes most of his money
on corn and hay, with his beef cattle serving as sort of “maintenance”
on his farm, with cows chewing down the grass and hay where needed. He
makes only about a 5% profit on his beef cattle because industrial
farming has driven down prices, he said.
“The CAFO is a thing of the future, part of the evolution.
Unfortunately I don’t know how you can feed the world any other way.
It can’t be done the old way. All the billions of people in the world
get up every morning and eat breakfast, and then lunch and dinner. The
next day they get up and do it all over again. Everything is so huge,
and there are so many less farmers. I’m not in love with seeing things
going this way, but I don’t have another answer to it,” said Hampel,
standing in his shop, while his four-year-old son played with boxes of
bolts and tools.

The local CAFO has had no problems or environmental violations, said
Garth Aslakson, environmental quality analyst for the Department of
Natural Resources and Environment.
But the corporation does have a troubling record. In a rare move, the
U.S. Department of Justice filed a request on August 31 of this year
for a permanent injunction against Scenic View, owner Mike Geerlings,
and three managers that oversee the dairy CAFOs in Fennville, Freeport
and Gowen, Michigan.
The request came after nine years of warnings. From 2001 to 2010, the
FDA contacted Scenic View Dairy eight times, while the USDA gave the
company 11 different written warnings. Yet the dairy continued to
medicate animals intended for slaughter at illegally high levels. The
company also used the antibiotic, neomycin, on lactating cows, which
violated the drugs’ FDA-approved labeling without a valid veterinary
prescription authorizing the extra-label use. Owner Mike Geerlings
didn’t return phone calls for an interview.
Lynn Henning, an award-winning investigator who works for the Michigan
Sierra Club Chapter, drew attention to a diesel spill at a Scenic View
CAFO into an irrigation pond in 2009. The spill necessitated the
removal of 5,500 gallons of water film and 65 tons of spoiled material
from the pond, which the company promptly completed when requested.
Henning has also raised questions with the DNRE about a mushroom
factory that was sold to Scenic View and contains sodium chloride

Antibiotics are routinely given to beef cattle, pigs and poultry to
fatten the animal quicker and to prevent disease that can knock down a
herd like dominoes.
All this matters because beef, swine and chicken dosed with
antibiotics—neomycin, penicillin, and sufadimethoxine in the case of
Scenic View—are consumed by humans. Antibiotics that don’t remain in
the animal are excreted into the environment.
Each year, 25 million pounds or 70% of the total antibiotics and
related drugs produced in the United States are fed to cattle, pigs
and poultry, according to an article on the website of the Union of
Concerned Scientists.
The medication of these CAFO animals is a key suspect of resistant
bacteria or superbugs that can’t be tamed with standard antibiotic
drugs. The most troublesome is MRSA, an extremely resistant staph
infection that can turn deadly.
Strains of this resistant bacteria can get carried from the CAFOs into
kitchens, according to the Union of Scientist’s article, “Prescription
for Trouble: Using Antibiotics to Fatten Livestock.”
Campylobacter, the number one cause of infectious diarrhea in the U.S,
is carried into kitchens on poultry and can make people sick when they
eat raw or undercooked chicken, the article said.
“While this does not always cause severe illness, the CDC estimates
that there are two to four million Campylobacter infections per year,
resulting in as many as 250 deaths each year in the United States,”
according to the article.
When it comes to dairy cows, the FDA disallows the sale of milk from
animals undergoing antibiotic treatment. But the CAFO practice of
giving low-level, continuous feedings of antibiotics, such as
penicillin and tetracycline to livestock and poultry for growth
promotion is not only legal, it’s also encouraged and defended by
government extension offices. Hormone growth implants are also legal.
These are synthetic estrogen compounds that cost only $1.50, but can
add up to 50 pounds to the weight of the steer, but are highly
controversial because they turn up in our meat and waterways,
according to a New York Times article by Michael Pollan.
The irony is that Hampel—who only uses antibiotics for sick animals
and never hormone growth implants—sells 80% of his pasture-raised
cattle to Tyson Foods in Joslyn,  Illinois, one of the nation’s
largest meat processors.   That’s the same place that CAFO operations
ship cattle.  Yet grocery shoppers have no way of distinguishing where
their meat comes from.

The practice of packing thousands of animals into small spaces has
Americans wondering about the safety of their food supply. In August
of this year, Wright County Egg and Hillendal Farms recalled a half
billion eggs because of salmonella contamination.  (One could say that
chickens suffer most greatly under this system; one CAFO in Ionia,
Michigan, houses close to 60,000 chickens.)
Earlier this summer, stores were ordered to take a million pounds of
tainted hamburger off their shelves, along with 400,000 pounds of deli
meats contaminated by listeria, according to news reports.
Awareness is growing. Some fear the presence of antibiotics, growth
hormones and bacteria, while others simply feel sorry for the animals,
such as hens that live out their plump, short lives enclosed in a
one-cubic foot battery cage barely able to move among their cellmates.
Some farmers in Northern Michigan have realized they can’t compete
with the CAFOs, in part, because they don’t have the land to grow the
needed grain or to dispose of the massive amount of manure.
According to the USDA, the average dairy cow produces up to 148 lbs.
of manure a day, depending on its age and size. That manure has to go
somewhere, and often it gets spread on hay and corn fields as
fertilizer—a ratio of five to six cows for every acre.

Next week: CAFO farmers on why their cattle are healthier.

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