Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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The sorry state of our state

Stephen Tuttle - January 24th, 2011
The Sorry State of Our States
It’s the time of year for State of the State addresses. If they are
honest, governors old and new will offer the same stark message –
states are in deep trouble.
Despite all the talk of the federal deficit, and it’s plenty bad, many
states are now facing calamitous deficits. Unlike the Feds, states
are confronted with constitutional requirements to balance their
budgets and they can’t just borrow from China or print more money.
According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, only Alaska,
Arkansas, Montana and North Dakota are not facing a deficit. Every
other state is in trouble.
Some state deficits, at least on paper, seem insurmountable. Eight
states have deficits that represent more than 30% of their budgets.
Michigan’s deficit, which is less than 10% of the budget, pales in
comparison.
Then there’s Nevada. They’re #1 in foreclosures and fully 67% of
their homes with mortgages are now under water (the home is worth less
than the mortgage). Their deficit this year will be an
incomprehensible 54% of the budget. If they cut their spending in
half it still won’t be quite enough.
We continue to bark at the politicians to stop spending, start cutting
and live within their means like we do. Of course, we do no such
thing. According to the Federal Reserve, we’ve racked up $2.7
trillion in personal debt and that excludes mortgage debt.
Besides, virtually every state has already started drastic cutting.
The last two or three years has seen a bloodletting of unprecedented
proportions in state and municipal budgets across the country. States
have used almost all the accounting tricks, delayed every payment they
could, hacked away at perceived waste, fraud and duplication and are
still coming up short as property tax, income tax and sales tax
revenues continue to sag.
In most states, the bulk of the budget goes to K-12 education,
community colleges and state universities and healthcare costs
associated with their Medicaid programs. In Michigan, public
education and healthcare consume nearly half the budget.
So what do we cut? Public schools are struggling as it is. Do we
eliminate art, music and other non-core classes? Close school
libraries? Eliminate school nurses and counselors? Eliminate all-day
kindergarten and pre-K learning? Do we dramatically increase class
sizes? Do we slash away at the benefits our teachers have been
promised?
What about state-funded healthcare programs for low-income families?
My old stomping grounds in Arizona, now faced with a deficit that’s
nearly 37% of their budget, has already eliminated organ transplants
and the governor has proposed eliminating 280,000 low income adults
altogether from their Medicaid program. It will save them more than
$500 million annually, at least on paper.
But no healthcare does not mean no illness. Those who might have made
it to a doctor early in a health crisis, or who might have had a
serious problem nipped in the bud with an annual preventative
check-up, will now use the healthcare system only in emergencies.
That means going to an emergency room where federal law requires they
be treated. That means much more uncompensated care costs landing at
the door of the hospitals. And it means lost revenue they would have
received from the state’s Medicaid program. As a bonus, states that
carve up their Medicaid programs may lose federal funding. That means
healthcare costs will increase, not decrease.
How did the states get in this mess in the first place?
We need to back up to the Clinton Administration. Times were good.
Real personal income was growing for the first time in two decades.
The stock market was on an upward slope many thought would never end.
Pension funds and investment portfolios were creating new
millionaires, at least on paper, day after day.
States were awash with revenues as we bought houses, cars, appliances
and other big ticket items. Private sector job creation was cruising
along at a record clip. Flush with all that new money, states started
hacking away at their tax rates while approving massive new spending.
Still, the cash flowed in and rates were cut even further.
What states did not do is protect their tax base or save money. As
long as the revenues kept flowing, Republicans and Democrats alike
just kept reducing rates and spending more.
Then the tech bubble burst and the markets tumbled. Investment
portfolios, including pension funds, took a big hit. So did tax
revenues as consumer spending began to stagnate.
States had committed to record levels of spending with a downsized tax
structure. When the housing market collapsed, states were screwed.
Revenues began to fall precipitously and there was no way to
compensate for the losses. State after state drifted into the red
until we ended up where we are today with 46 states trying to figure
out how to balance budgets.
Our past state legislatures spent wildly, saved little and diminished
revenue bases. Current legislatures are faced with impossible
choices. There are huge obligations, no money and, given the current
political landscape, no way to increase revenues.
It’s a sad state of affairs.

 
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