Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Books · Cloud 9
. . . .

Cloud 9

Rick Coates - January 24th, 2011
Cloud 9:New book aims to teach kids traditional values
By Rick Coates
At 64, Larry Kuhnke has opened a new “chapter” in his life: that of an author. After a career in the airline and banking industries Kuhnke decided to impart his wisdom unto others. But instead of writing about his observations and knowledge from his professional world, he decided on sharing his insights on how to best pursue a life of happiness. Advice that he hopes the younger generation will grasp early in life and carry with them into adulthood.
This Saturday, January 29, the Traverse City author will sign copies of his book “Cloud 9” at Horizon Books in Traverse City from 2 to 4 pm.
Kuhnke believes that it is “easier to learn while you are young than when you grow older.” He wrote “Cloud 9” with the idea that it would serve as a conversation starter between parents or grandparents and children. The 80-page book has 43 chapters, each representing an important value to live by.
“This book is my lifestyle, it is based on what I was taught growing up. Now, some of these values I came to understand in adulthood,” said Kuhnke. “As I reflect on my life these are the values that I believe will help a person achieve happiness and fulfillment in life. These concepts are how I raised my two daughters and now what I am sharing with my four grandchildren.”

10 YEARS IN THE MAKING
Kuhnke, who describes himself as a person of few words and one who observes his surroundings closely, started developing the concept of the book 10 years ago.
“I noticed in my travels and daily observations that many young people were not being taught the basic fundamentals and values of life,” said Kuhnke. “That peer pressure and life’s daily distractions seemed to be leading many down a path of unhappiness rather then happiness. In addition, many children are not getting parental guidance on core values and beliefs.”
Kuhnke believes that many parents “often struggle with how to instill in their children a system of values that will guide them toward happiness, good health, and success in life.” His goal with the book is that if children start early adopting these values they will go through life living on “cloud 9.”
“These concepts are simple, basic values that in recent years have been overlooked by many and I think the result is we are paying for it in society today,” said Kuhnke. “My wife and I decided to do the simple things with our daughters, like nightly meals without electronic distractions.”

CREATING A DIALOGUE
How “Cloud 9” differs from other books in the same vein is that Kuhnke does not use a preachy tone, but instead is suggestive and encouraging in his approach.
“My goal with this book was to create a dialogue between parents and their children. Children, regardless of their age, will ask questions and their parents will be able to share the specifics of each value with them.”
“Cloud 9” covers what most would consider to be obvious values such as ‘The Truth,” “Integrity,” “Responsibility” and “Ethics & Morals.” Kuhnke also expands beyond the obvious and touches on “Sportsmanship,” “Your Word,” “Dreams,” “Financial “Accountability,” “Goals” and the importance of “singing and dancing.”
“Well like I said, not everything in this book I learned in childhood… and certainly singing and dancing is one of those things,” said Kuhnke. “I understand their importance now and am trying to do both. They make you feel good and both are great ways to meet new people.”
Kuhnke grew up in Monroe, Michigan in what he describes as a humble upbringing. His father was a Marine and eventually worked at Ford while his mother worked part time in a tavern. He had four siblings and lived in a three-bedroom house with one bathroom. His grandmother also lived in the home. Kuhnke learned many life lessons at an early age and setting goals was one of them.
“I did set goals, one of my most meaningful was to become an Eagle Scout. I accomplished that by the age of 13. I also learned that by growing up with so many of these values it opened doors for my personally and professionally through my life.”
So was there anything Kuhnke would change about the book?
“I forgot one value, an important one and if there is a second printing I will add it,” said Kuhnke. “Forgiveness is so important in life; it was an oversight on my part.”
As for the future, Kuhnke is not sure if another book is in store for him. He wants to see how this one plays out. He also wants to be active in his grandchildren’s lives. Plus he has plenty of hobbies to keep himself busy, from downhill skiing and tinkering with tractors to boating and waterskiing in the summer.
“I can still get up on one ski and I am very proud of that.”

Author Larry Kuhnke will be at Horizon Books in downtown Traverse City this Saturday from 2 to 4 pm signing copies of his book “Cloud 9.” He has committed 50% of the proceeds from all sales of the book to charities that benefit children. To get a sneak peak of the book check out www.tiny.cc/cloud9.
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close