Letters

Letters 02-01-2016

Real Contamination In 1968, Chicago (its Mayor Richard Daley in particular) felt menaced by anti-war protesters (Abbie Hoffman in particular) threatening to put the hallucinogenic LSD into Chicago’s water supply. In reaction to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., we reacted vigorously to a perceived threat of chemical or biological terrorist attacks on our water supply. A religious cult contaminating a city water tank with salmonella in Oregon, sickening about 700, was the only such attack in our country until now. The water supply of Flint, Mich., was attacked and contaminated, not by terrorists or protesters, but by our own government...

Why The Muslim Debate? I was passing through your fine town last week and picked up a couple copies of Northern Express. There I noted a discourse concerning the Muslim situation in Dearborn. It is interesting to note that I see similar conversations in newspapers and blogs throughout the country and, in fact, throughout the world...

Kachadurian Has It All Wrong Thank you for continuing to publish Thomas Kachadurian’s bigoted editorials. If not for this publication, I wouldn’t know that such people lived in my sweet northern Michigan...

Over The Line I felt Sarah Palin crossed the line when she indicated our president did not care about those like her son who came home wounded. No one challenges her on these remarks; to me it is shameful...

Flints’ Man-made Disaster Governor Snyder’s Financial Emergency Manager Law has created a State of Emergency in Flint. In 2011, newly elected Governor Snyder signed Public Act 4, giving him the freedom to take over any city government his office found financially bankrupt, with power to override any decision of elected city officials. This law showed his primary motive — money before people. In November 2012, the People of Michigan voted down his Financial Emergency Manager Law, as they resented losing control of their cities. In December 2012, he showed his contempt for the people’s vote and signed a revised version, one that did not give power back to the people...

Defending the AR15 And Gun Rights I was amazed to read David Downer’s recent letter. He admits he is a gun owner but he expresses his ignorance of what an “assault rifle” really is, and thereby spreads the antigun position that an AR15 is an assault rifle...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Cloud 9
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Cloud 9

Rick Coates - January 24th, 2011
Cloud 9:New book aims to teach kids traditional values
By Rick Coates
At 64, Larry Kuhnke has opened a new “chapter” in his life: that of an author. After a career in the airline and banking industries Kuhnke decided to impart his wisdom unto others. But instead of writing about his observations and knowledge from his professional world, he decided on sharing his insights on how to best pursue a life of happiness. Advice that he hopes the younger generation will grasp early in life and carry with them into adulthood.
This Saturday, January 29, the Traverse City author will sign copies of his book “Cloud 9” at Horizon Books in Traverse City from 2 to 4 pm.
Kuhnke believes that it is “easier to learn while you are young than when you grow older.” He wrote “Cloud 9” with the idea that it would serve as a conversation starter between parents or grandparents and children. The 80-page book has 43 chapters, each representing an important value to live by.
“This book is my lifestyle, it is based on what I was taught growing up. Now, some of these values I came to understand in adulthood,” said Kuhnke. “As I reflect on my life these are the values that I believe will help a person achieve happiness and fulfillment in life. These concepts are how I raised my two daughters and now what I am sharing with my four grandchildren.”

10 YEARS IN THE MAKING
Kuhnke, who describes himself as a person of few words and one who observes his surroundings closely, started developing the concept of the book 10 years ago.
“I noticed in my travels and daily observations that many young people were not being taught the basic fundamentals and values of life,” said Kuhnke. “That peer pressure and life’s daily distractions seemed to be leading many down a path of unhappiness rather then happiness. In addition, many children are not getting parental guidance on core values and beliefs.”
Kuhnke believes that many parents “often struggle with how to instill in their children a system of values that will guide them toward happiness, good health, and success in life.” His goal with the book is that if children start early adopting these values they will go through life living on “cloud 9.”
“These concepts are simple, basic values that in recent years have been overlooked by many and I think the result is we are paying for it in society today,” said Kuhnke. “My wife and I decided to do the simple things with our daughters, like nightly meals without electronic distractions.”

CREATING A DIALOGUE
How “Cloud 9” differs from other books in the same vein is that Kuhnke does not use a preachy tone, but instead is suggestive and encouraging in his approach.
“My goal with this book was to create a dialogue between parents and their children. Children, regardless of their age, will ask questions and their parents will be able to share the specifics of each value with them.”
“Cloud 9” covers what most would consider to be obvious values such as ‘The Truth,” “Integrity,” “Responsibility” and “Ethics & Morals.” Kuhnke also expands beyond the obvious and touches on “Sportsmanship,” “Your Word,” “Dreams,” “Financial “Accountability,” “Goals” and the importance of “singing and dancing.”
“Well like I said, not everything in this book I learned in childhood… and certainly singing and dancing is one of those things,” said Kuhnke. “I understand their importance now and am trying to do both. They make you feel good and both are great ways to meet new people.”
Kuhnke grew up in Monroe, Michigan in what he describes as a humble upbringing. His father was a Marine and eventually worked at Ford while his mother worked part time in a tavern. He had four siblings and lived in a three-bedroom house with one bathroom. His grandmother also lived in the home. Kuhnke learned many life lessons at an early age and setting goals was one of them.
“I did set goals, one of my most meaningful was to become an Eagle Scout. I accomplished that by the age of 13. I also learned that by growing up with so many of these values it opened doors for my personally and professionally through my life.”
So was there anything Kuhnke would change about the book?
“I forgot one value, an important one and if there is a second printing I will add it,” said Kuhnke. “Forgiveness is so important in life; it was an oversight on my part.”
As for the future, Kuhnke is not sure if another book is in store for him. He wants to see how this one plays out. He also wants to be active in his grandchildren’s lives. Plus he has plenty of hobbies to keep himself busy, from downhill skiing and tinkering with tractors to boating and waterskiing in the summer.
“I can still get up on one ski and I am very proud of that.”

Author Larry Kuhnke will be at Horizon Books in downtown Traverse City this Saturday from 2 to 4 pm signing copies of his book “Cloud 9.” He has committed 50% of the proceeds from all sales of the book to charities that benefit children. To get a sneak peak of the book check out www.tiny.cc/cloud9.
 
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