Letters

Letters 08-03-2015

Real Brownfields Deserve Dollars I read with interest the story on Brownfield development dollars in the July 20 issue. I applaud Dan Lathrop and other county commissioners who voted “No” on the Randolph Street project...

Hopping Mad Carlin Smith is hopping mad (“Will You Get Mad With Me?” 7-20-15). Somebody filed a fraudulent return using his identity, and he’s not alone. The AP estimates the government “pays more than $5 billion annually in fraudulent tax refunds.” Well, many of us have been hopping mad for years. This is because the number one tool Congress has used to fix this problem has been to cut the IRS budget –by $1.2 billion in the last 5 years...

Just Grumbling, No Solutions Mark Pontoni’s grumblings [recent Northern Express column] tell us much about him and virtually nothing about those he chooses to denigrate. We do learn that Pontoni may be the perfect political candidate. He’s arrogant, opinionated and obviously dimwitted...

A Racist Symbol I have to respond to Gordon Lee Dean’s letter claiming that the confederate battle flag is just a symbol of southern heritage and should not be banned from state displays. The heritage it represents was the treasonous effort to continue slavery by seceding from a democratic nation unwilling to maintain such a consummate evil...

Not So Thanks I would like to thank the individual who ran into and knocked over my Triumph motorcycle while it was parked at Lowe’s in TC on Friday the 24th. The $3,000 worth of damage was greatly appreciated. The big dent in the gas tank under the completely destroyed chrome badge was an especially nice touch...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Lyle Lovett
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Lyle Lovett

Kristi Kates - August 2nd, 2010
Lyle Lovett: Livin‘ Large
By Kristi Kates
Four Grammy Awards, one Large Band, 40 cities on the tour schedule, and one acclaimed all-American performer. The components that make up Texan Lyle Lovett’s success are varied and many, but for the singer-songwriter himself, it all breaks down to the songs.
“My songs can be just a stray thought that’s a reaction to something going on, or a reflection of what’s going on in my own life,” Lovett says. “My songs are about people, about trying to figure out what every day is like, what every day means.”
But writing those songs is most definitely more than just a job, Lovett explains.
“It’s not something that ever seems like work, or that I have to do,” he says.
The “work” part is left up to Lovett’s PR people, who, he points out, sometimes have a difficult time figuring out how to promote the multi-faceted musician, who simply will not be pigeonholed, even within the genre of country music.
“There is not a commercial design to exploring and playing the styles of music that I enjoy listening to,” he says, “In fact, it poses a very difficult marketing situation for the people you’re in business with. But my enjoyment of being able to creatively move wherever I like to outweighs the difficulty.”

NATURAL FORCES
Lovett’s newest album, Natural Forces, brings together the most well-known elements of his songwriting skills, with an even balance between subtle balladry and the Western wit that Lovett has become identified with.
As mentioned above, all of Lovett’s new songs - just as on previous releases - expand broadly on what’s perhaps considered “merely” country music; the arrangements are sprinkled with everything from blues to jazz, gospel to Texas swing.
Standouts on Natural Forces include Lovett’s pretty take on “Whooping Crane,” the interestingly-written “Loretta,” and the quirky original “Farmer Brown/Chicken Reel.” And Lovett’s backing band can handle it all with aplomb - the musical collective that he’s simply dubbed “His Large Band” has easily adapted its numbers and musical approaches over the years to suit whichever songs of Lovett’s they’re performing.

HIS LARGE BAND
“The idea for the band was a result of just trying to do justice to the recordings live,” Lovett explains, “one thing sort of leads to another, and all of a sudden you’re standing in the middle of 18 people on stage.”
Lovett alternates touring with His Large Band with acoustic shows, on which he often appears alongside musical compatriots such as John Hiatt, Joe Ely, and Guy Clark. Although he’s yet to specify exactly which form his upcoming live show at Interlochen will take and how much of His Large Band will be there, the audience can be assured that they’ll be treated to Lovett performing at his best - which for him, is every performance.
“To be so focused for a month or two during a tour, to be that dedicated to one end, to be able to do the best show you can every day - that’s really nice,” Lovett says, “I feel so fortunate that our live audience really has been what’s supported me over these years. That’s really my focus, is to be able to go out and do a good show.”
Lyle Lovett and His Large Band will be performing at Interlochen’s Kresge Auditorium on Monday, August 9 at 8 p.m.

 
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