Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Chris Dorman's...
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Chris Dorman's Vermont-Michigan-Internet connection

Kristi Kates - October 11th, 2010
Dorman’s dual locales aren’t stopping him from promoting his album, either; as a matter of fact, he says that there are many interesting ways that musicians can transcend their physical locations in order to present their music to wider audiences.
“I am encouraged by the new accessibility that web-based technology has provided for independent musicians and listeners,” Dorman says, “and I plan to continue walking intentionally down the path towards making music for a living.”

LIVE ON THE INTERNET
Dorman grew up with parents who were both amateur singers. He got his own start in music when he was presented with a battered 1960s Yamaha guitar at the age of 15.
From that point on, Dorman was hooked; he soon began performing regularly at an open mic in Lansing, proceeded to become the host of the weekly event, and subsequently began taking his own music across the country, “from street corners to coffee shops.”
Today, one way that Dorman is harnessing the power of the internet is via his 10.10.10 show, which, as you may guess, was set to take place on Sunday, October 10. Dorman, along with musical pal Steve Leaf, performed in Craftsbury Common, Vermont, while Seth and May performed in Kalamazoo; both sets were recorded and streamed live on the internet.
“Viewers will be able to watch the show on their computers as if it was one show,” Dorman said in advance of the show. “Live audiences in both states will watch the long distance set projected in their venue. You’ll be able to access the show from our respective websites, www.chrisdormanmusic.com, and www.sethandmay.com.”
The 10.10.10 show was put together in order to join millions of other people organizing events for 350.org’s Global Day of Action.
“The purpose of this movement is to bring awareness to Global Climate Change, and to show our world leaders we care about this issue,” Dorman says.

VERMONT-MICHIGAN CONNECTION
In addition to this worthy cause, Dorman’s fans, of course, will also care about his new Sita album, which was recorded in Okemos.
“We set the studio up retreat-style,” Dorman says. “Everyone slept there, ate there, and everyone was invited to bring all of themselves to the session.
“The individual songs draw from many different ideas and experiences, but I think listeners will pick up on my last couple years of transition throughout the album,” he adds.
Dorman’s move - what he calls a “developing story” - also spurred him to start what he’s calling “The Vermont-Michigan Exchange Program.”
“Many friends have already visited the farm, and we will begin next year to host a concert series. There are also theories about humans being drawn to the same latitude even if they move far distances - and I think Burlington and Traverse City are pretty darn close.”
Dorman also put some extra time into arranging the tracks on Sita in a unique fashion that solidifies the album’s presence - and perhaps anchors it even more to both of its geographic locales.
“Each song on Sita ends on a note that is a part of the first chord of the next song,” he explains, “in that way, the album is one piece.”

Chris Dorman will be performing songs from his new album, Sita, at the 10.10.10 Concert via the internet. In addition, he will be performing at Higher Grounds in Traverse City at 8 pm on Oct. 14, at the Great Lakes Bioneers Conference in Traverse City on Oct. 15, and at several additional Michigan shows through Oct. 23. Visit www.chrisdormanmusic.com for details.


 
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