Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · The Sound of Music
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The Sound of Music

Robert Downes - November 22nd, 2010
Sound of Music ;New amphitheatre dovetails with garden & barns project at GT Commons
By Robert Downes
A new 1,000-seat outdoor concert facility at the site of the historic barns of the Grand Traverse Commons could fill the surrounding hills with the sound of music within the next two years.
“We’re very excited about this project, which will combine the efforts of the Botanic Garden Society to create a new 25-acre botanic garden, along with a plan to renovate and restore the cathedral barns at the Grand Traverse Commons,” says Benjamin Marentette, executive director of the Recreational Authority for both the City of Traverse City and Garfield Township.
Marentette has been working on the project known as the Historic Barns Park for the past two-and-a-half years. He says it’s a team effort with three nonprofit players, including the Botanical Garden Society of Northwest Michigan, as well as Little Artshram (which overviews a community garden at the site) and SEEDS, which offers a farmer residency program.
Another key player is concert promoter Sam Porter of Porterhouse Productions, who has taken a pro bono role as an advisor on the creation of an amphitheatre at the intersection of the two 11,500-square-foot barns at the southern end of the Grand Traverse Commons. Porter hopes to bring in big-name national acts for a summer season of outdoor concerts in the years ahead.

TOURIST ATTRACTION
When completed, the Historic Barns Park is expected to have the same sort of allure as Meijer Gardens in Grand Rapids, a lush sculpture park which also offers a summer concert series, featuring top acts such as Chris Isaak and Willy Nelson.
“Meijer Gardens is a major tourist draw for Grand Rapids and we see the same sort of excitement happening here in Traverse City with the new park,” Marentette says.
He adds that the barns will play a year-round role in the entertainment and cultural mix. Both the Cathedral Barn (built in 1932) and the Historic Barn (1900) have two floors available for multiple uses. These could include symphonic concerts, plays and dance events; a year-round farm market; weddings, expositions and art fairs.
Organizers are preparing a fundraising campaign to raise the $1.5 million needed to launch the Botanic Garden, renovate the barns, and create the amphitheatre. Details on the capital campaign will be announced soon.
So, assuming the fundraising campaign goes well, when could the public begin enjoying their first concerts on the site, or a stroll through the new Botanic Garden?
“We certainly wish for sooner rather than later, but we’re hoping for 2012 or 2013 at the latest.”
 
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