Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Music · The Sound of Music
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The Sound of Music

Robert Downes - November 22nd, 2010
Sound of Music ;New amphitheatre dovetails with garden & barns project at GT Commons
By Robert Downes
A new 1,000-seat outdoor concert facility at the site of the historic barns of the Grand Traverse Commons could fill the surrounding hills with the sound of music within the next two years.
“We’re very excited about this project, which will combine the efforts of the Botanic Garden Society to create a new 25-acre botanic garden, along with a plan to renovate and restore the cathedral barns at the Grand Traverse Commons,” says Benjamin Marentette, executive director of the Recreational Authority for both the City of Traverse City and Garfield Township.
Marentette has been working on the project known as the Historic Barns Park for the past two-and-a-half years. He says it’s a team effort with three nonprofit players, including the Botanical Garden Society of Northwest Michigan, as well as Little Artshram (which overviews a community garden at the site) and SEEDS, which offers a farmer residency program.
Another key player is concert promoter Sam Porter of Porterhouse Productions, who has taken a pro bono role as an advisor on the creation of an amphitheatre at the intersection of the two 11,500-square-foot barns at the southern end of the Grand Traverse Commons. Porter hopes to bring in big-name national acts for a summer season of outdoor concerts in the years ahead.

TOURIST ATTRACTION
When completed, the Historic Barns Park is expected to have the same sort of allure as Meijer Gardens in Grand Rapids, a lush sculpture park which also offers a summer concert series, featuring top acts such as Chris Isaak and Willy Nelson.
“Meijer Gardens is a major tourist draw for Grand Rapids and we see the same sort of excitement happening here in Traverse City with the new park,” Marentette says.
He adds that the barns will play a year-round role in the entertainment and cultural mix. Both the Cathedral Barn (built in 1932) and the Historic Barn (1900) have two floors available for multiple uses. These could include symphonic concerts, plays and dance events; a year-round farm market; weddings, expositions and art fairs.
Organizers are preparing a fundraising campaign to raise the $1.5 million needed to launch the Botanic Garden, renovate the barns, and create the amphitheatre. Details on the capital campaign will be announced soon.
So, assuming the fundraising campaign goes well, when could the public begin enjoying their first concerts on the site, or a stroll through the new Botanic Garden?
“We certainly wish for sooner rather than later, but we’re hoping for 2012 or 2013 at the latest.”
 
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