Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · Sorrentino‘s...
. . . .

Sorrentino‘s Situation

Robert Downes - January 10th, 2011
Sorrentino’s Situation
There was a shirtless photo of Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino of MTV’s
Jersey Shore in last week’s edition of Entertainment Weekly. The
Situation, of course, is world-famous for his abs, and looks to be ‘cut’
about as deep as the Grand Canyon.
Anyone who’s ever trained for a body building competition, a black
belt, or for their first marathon, can appreciate the kind of effort
that goes into Sorrentino’s level of fitness. But as any fitness junkie
knows, getting there is one thing -- staying there is another.
We‘re a bit of an ‘abs obsessed’ society, with gadgets such as the
Coaster Abs and Abs Circuit machines advertised on TV as ways to tone
your tummy. And has there ever been an issue of Men’s Health magazine
in its 24 years of publication that didn’t have a front page story
along the lines of this week’s “Strip Away Belly Fat”?
Some of the people in the infomercials look like they’ve taken obsession
with their abdominal muscles to the brink of madness. But for those
whose six-pack tends to be in the refrigerator rather than above the
belt loops, Sorrentino notes that there’s no easy route to a washboard
gut.
Sorrentino reportedly does 3-4 abdominal exercises every other day,
along with lower back exercises to complement the force of his ab
muscles. He reports on various websites that he does a half-hour cardio
workout in the gym 5-6 days each week along the lines of running,
swimming or cycling.
He also avoids sugary foods, cake, cookies, salty snacks, Coca-Cola and
other counter-productive junk foods. He favors clean-burning veggies and
protein, avoiding high-carb foods. He smokes cigarettes, but that’s a
prerequisite for Jersey Shore lounge lizards.
“I also do three or four very, very difficult exercises,” he tells Us
magazine. “They’re very, very difficult, done over months of time to
get used to it,” he adds for emphasis, noting that these may involve
hanging upside down. “It looks like I’m doing gymnastics.”
Sounds pretty tough. It makes you wonder though, Sorrentino is a
28-year-old former fitness trainer. What will he look like 10, 20, 30
years from now?
Pretty good if he keeps it up, but that -- as any Weight Watchers
success story can tell you -- is the tough part.
Persevering.
Persevering is the devil’s bargain in fitness. You might be able to
chisel your gut into something resembling Sorrentino’s belly. You might
knock yourself silly to achieve a sub-40-minute 10k. You might lose 300
lbs. and win The Biggest Loser’s grand prize. But holding on to that
peak moment of fitness or dietary denial -- that’s the hard part.
Staying motivated long past the chipper hard-body days of your 20s and
30s is the price of the fitness lifestyle. Will Sorrentino continue
with his “very, very difficult” abs workout for years on end, hanging
upside down like a fruit bat five times a week and doing endless
vertical crunches and hanging lifts? Or will he get bored silly by the
time he hits 40 and start that flabby slide into what passes for
normality in America? That’s ‘the situation’ faced by every lifetime
devotee to fitness.
Studies claim that muscle mass begins to decrease in a big way after
the age of 40. By one estimate, your skeletal muscle mass decreases by
up to 40% by the time you reach the age of 80.
But it doesn’t have to be so. According to the American College of
Sports Medicine, strength training twice a week on top of 20-30 minutes
of cardio each day can counteract a decline in muscle mass. This is why
you sometimes see weight trainers, yoga practitioners, runners and
cyclists in their 60s who still have the strength of people 30 years
younger; they’re locked into a lifestyle and their workouts and never
quit long enough to waste away.
It all gets back to persevering with a daily exercise plan and mixing
it up with different modalities: yoga, swimming, weight training,
pilates, walking/running, skiing, etc., when the same old grind gets to
be too much to endure.
So get moving and good luck -- your abs are counting on you. Who knows?
By this time next year your stomach may even be mistaken for that of
Mike Sorrentino‘s.

 
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