Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · Sorrentino‘s...
. . . .

Sorrentino‘s Situation

Robert Downes - January 10th, 2011
Sorrentino’s Situation
There was a shirtless photo of Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino of MTV’s
Jersey Shore in last week’s edition of Entertainment Weekly. The
Situation, of course, is world-famous for his abs, and looks to be ‘cut’
about as deep as the Grand Canyon.
Anyone who’s ever trained for a body building competition, a black
belt, or for their first marathon, can appreciate the kind of effort
that goes into Sorrentino’s level of fitness. But as any fitness junkie
knows, getting there is one thing -- staying there is another.
We‘re a bit of an ‘abs obsessed’ society, with gadgets such as the
Coaster Abs and Abs Circuit machines advertised on TV as ways to tone
your tummy. And has there ever been an issue of Men’s Health magazine
in its 24 years of publication that didn’t have a front page story
along the lines of this week’s “Strip Away Belly Fat”?
Some of the people in the infomercials look like they’ve taken obsession
with their abdominal muscles to the brink of madness. But for those
whose six-pack tends to be in the refrigerator rather than above the
belt loops, Sorrentino notes that there’s no easy route to a washboard
gut.
Sorrentino reportedly does 3-4 abdominal exercises every other day,
along with lower back exercises to complement the force of his ab
muscles. He reports on various websites that he does a half-hour cardio
workout in the gym 5-6 days each week along the lines of running,
swimming or cycling.
He also avoids sugary foods, cake, cookies, salty snacks, Coca-Cola and
other counter-productive junk foods. He favors clean-burning veggies and
protein, avoiding high-carb foods. He smokes cigarettes, but that’s a
prerequisite for Jersey Shore lounge lizards.
“I also do three or four very, very difficult exercises,” he tells Us
magazine. “They’re very, very difficult, done over months of time to
get used to it,” he adds for emphasis, noting that these may involve
hanging upside down. “It looks like I’m doing gymnastics.”
Sounds pretty tough. It makes you wonder though, Sorrentino is a
28-year-old former fitness trainer. What will he look like 10, 20, 30
years from now?
Pretty good if he keeps it up, but that -- as any Weight Watchers
success story can tell you -- is the tough part.
Persevering.
Persevering is the devil’s bargain in fitness. You might be able to
chisel your gut into something resembling Sorrentino’s belly. You might
knock yourself silly to achieve a sub-40-minute 10k. You might lose 300
lbs. and win The Biggest Loser’s grand prize. But holding on to that
peak moment of fitness or dietary denial -- that’s the hard part.
Staying motivated long past the chipper hard-body days of your 20s and
30s is the price of the fitness lifestyle. Will Sorrentino continue
with his “very, very difficult” abs workout for years on end, hanging
upside down like a fruit bat five times a week and doing endless
vertical crunches and hanging lifts? Or will he get bored silly by the
time he hits 40 and start that flabby slide into what passes for
normality in America? That’s ‘the situation’ faced by every lifetime
devotee to fitness.
Studies claim that muscle mass begins to decrease in a big way after
the age of 40. By one estimate, your skeletal muscle mass decreases by
up to 40% by the time you reach the age of 80.
But it doesn’t have to be so. According to the American College of
Sports Medicine, strength training twice a week on top of 20-30 minutes
of cardio each day can counteract a decline in muscle mass. This is why
you sometimes see weight trainers, yoga practitioners, runners and
cyclists in their 60s who still have the strength of people 30 years
younger; they’re locked into a lifestyle and their workouts and never
quit long enough to waste away.
It all gets back to persevering with a daily exercise plan and mixing
it up with different modalities: yoga, swimming, weight training,
pilates, walking/running, skiing, etc., when the same old grind gets to
be too much to endure.
So get moving and good luck -- your abs are counting on you. Who knows?
By this time next year your stomach may even be mistaken for that of
Mike Sorrentino‘s.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close