Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Books · Don Piper spent 90 Minutes in...
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Don Piper spent 90 Minutes in Heaven

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli - October 11th, 2010
Today, Piper is a pastor and the author of the New York Times best-selling “90 Minutes in Heaven.” He’ll share his experience of the
afterlife in a Big Life Ministries presentation, to be be held at Bay Pointe Community Church, this Sunday, October 17 from 6-7:30 p.m.
How did the book come to be? After months in the hospital and years of therapy and surgeries, another pastor asked him about the time he
was declared dead. Until then Don had kept his experience to himself but he finally opened up to his friend, describing it in words he declared inadequate to the experience. “Warm, radiant light engulfed me . . .” he said. “I could hardly grasp the vivid, dazzling colors.
Every hue and tone surpassed anything I had ever seen. . . I stood speechless in front of a crowd of loved ones.” He became aware of a bright light he called “brilliantly intense and utterly luminous.” But not God and not Jesus. For Piper, heaven was amazing light, old friends standing in front of “a brilliantly ornate gate,” and heavenly music. He’d been sad to leave, he said. He didn’t want to be drawn back to his earthly life.
How does Pastor Don Piper differ now from the man he was before the accident?
Piper: I have learned a far deeper compassion and understanding of others. I was a pastor before the accident and counseled people. I officiated at funerals. I always knew the things to say but now I’m not just saying comforting words. I know where their loved one has gone. My priorities are completely rearranged. There is no fear in
me of the end of life. I hope I can pass that on to others.

NE: The man who hit your car -- an inmate from a local prison driving a guard on a food pickup for the prison -- have you spoken to him since the accident and your experience in heaven?
Piper: The man went back to prison. In a sense, so did I. Years of hospitalization, pain, rehabilitation. He was paroled by the time I
was well enough to contact him but what I’ve done is written him a letter, included in a new book I just finished writing. In the letter I forgive him and tell him that I probably won’t meet him here on earth but I know now I will meet him in heaven.
I didn’t want to write the book at all. It took a long time for friends to convince me I had to tell the story. Then I agreed only if I could tell it with absolute honesty, unvarnished, just as it happened. I’m sure not a hero in this, more a victim. Still, if I could help others, bring comfort, then I said I’d tell the story.
Otherwise I’d never have been talked into writing about heaven. That was so wonderful and so private.

NE: Do you think the life you led before the accident merited the reward you were given?
Piper: No, I was an ordinary man on the way to church. What I know now is that it isn’t what happens to you, but what you do with it. I
had to decide how everything that happened was going to affect me. Was I going to be defeated or use my circumstance to bless others? I know now that heaven is real. Thousands ask how to get there and I know that living a fuller life leads to an eternal life. That doesn’t mean a pain-free life here on earth, not an easy life, but what ever it is, it has a beautiful ending in eternity.

NE: Your wife, Eve, what did she learn from your experience? Has she grown too?
Piper: Eve is the hero of my story. When the truth of what I would become hit me, it hit her too. She took care of me through this long
roller coaster ride. She emptied those bedpans, balanced the checkbook, worked at her teaching job, stayed at the hospital with me through those long months. Eve is stronger now too. She learned to lean on others and on herself. We’ve been married for 37 years. I’m a survivor, but Eve’s an overcomer.

NE: Are you the same person today as you were then, standing outside of heaven’s gates?
Piper: I didn’t understand why I was given that glimpse of heaven and then it was taken away. What changed was that I understood why I had
to go through the pain I went through. Now, when I hold a hospital patient’s hand I understand how real that pain is. When I speak to the family of a loved one who has just died, I speak with assurance.
My message to everyone is always: you can make it. Life may be different after a huge life event, but it will always get better.

NE: In heaven, you say you received no special message; that you were only shown possibility. Do you wish there had been more?
Piper: I’m glad I didn’t see anymore than I did. If I had, I couldn’t have functioned back here. I would have been too angry over the loss. It was enough to know how glorious and magnificent it is and what is waiting for all of us. In the talk I’ll be giving at Bay Pointe Church I’ll be telling people that we’re taking reservations
for heaven now. I was only 38 when I died and came back. You have to be ready for heaven at every moment of your life.

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli will be teaching: A Novel Experience: Fiction Writing Workshop, at NMC on Friday, Nov. 5, 9 am – 4 pm at Oleson Center. Call 231-995-1700 to register.
 
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