Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · The greatest baseball...
. . . .

The greatest baseball player of all time

George Foster - November 1st, 2010
As the 2010 World Series winds down, you and I are once again left to
debate that centuries-old dilemma: who really is the greatest baseball
player to ever trod the earth?
Babe Ruth was famous for his power-hitting (and power-living), Ty Cobb
had the best career batting average, and pitcher Cy Young won over 500
games in his long and storied career. We youngsters might put our vote
in for Alex Rodriquez, Barry Bonds, or Roger Clemens.
Though I never saw Joe DiMaggio play, my generation always considered
him the greatest living ballplayer until he died in 1999. My most
vivid images are of a smiling, older gentleman pawning off
coffeemakers for decades on TV commercials, not a contender for the
absolutely best player in history.
Ironically, after reading the disturbing account of “Joe DiMaggio: The
Hero’s Life” by Richard Ben Cramer, I came to realize the Yankee
Clipper was the greatest baseball player of all time. Before reading
Cramer’s controversial book, I would have taken Ruth or Cobb as my
choice.
“The Hero’s Life” is tirelessly researched – looking behind Joe D.’s
public image as the wholesome son of a poor fisherman. Cramer’s book
concludes that DiMaggio was a cruel, selfish, and vindictive man,
especially toward his own friends and family. He may have even
physically abused Marilyn Monroe. Though he earned huge salaries for
his playing era and millions after his baseball career was over,
DiMaggio expected everyone else to pay his tabs because he was… well,
a hero.
Though the book accuses DiMaggio of being personally flawed in the
extreme, Cramer also illustrates why he was the best baseball player
in history. He hit for average and power. He played center field
without equal in the cavernous Yankee Stadium - with a powerful
throwing arm.
The Yankee Clipper was also fleet afoot and driven to win – the nine
World Series titles he won were more than any player in history except
Yogi Berra (10). While Berra’s accomplishments were spread out over 19
seasons, DiMaggio played only 13 years - missing three baseball
seasons 1943 to 1945 while serving in the military during World War
II.
In 1941 Joltin’ Joe set one of sport’s most famous records that may
never be broken: 56 consecutive games with at least one hit.
Amazingly, after going hitless in the 57th game, DiMaggio immediately
had another hitting streak of 16 straight games.
The Yankee Clipper ‘s personal accomplishments are impressive, but a
few others were able to rack up gaudier statistics overall. However,
if the goal in professional sports is to win titles (and it is), Joe
DiMaggio was the best. He was the best player on the best team of his
era – a time when the New York Yankees dominated baseball.
In his nine championship seasons, Joltin’ Joe put the team on his back
and carried them into the Series almost single-handedly. He rose to
the pinnacle of his profession while often injured and under the
intense scrutiny of the New York press, the center of the sports
universe in the 1940s. Joe DiMaggio was the greatest hero of the
greatest generation.
Paul Simon might have decided baseball’s greatest player when he
wrote, “Where have you gone Joe DiMaggio? A nation turns its lonely
eyes to you (woo woo woo).”
If you don’t agree, maybe you just had to be there.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close