Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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4Play: Brian Wilson, Madlib, Lloyd Miller, Various Artists

Kristi Kates - November 8th, 2010
Brian Wilson - Reimagines Gershwin - Disney
The uber-talented Brian Wilson keeps evolving as a creative musician, this time taking on two pieces of music left by the equally skillful George Gershwin when he passed away (with the approval of the Gershwin estate.) Wilson’s gift for melodies blends perfectly with Gershwin’s
lush, beautiful compositions, adding modernity to the likes of “They Can’t Take That Away From Me” and “Summertime.” And Wilson completes the unfinished “The Like in I Love You” and “Nothing But Love” with his gift for songcraft; he adds beachy buoyancy and delicate emotion to both of these tracks that Gershwin unintentionally left in very good musical hands.


Madlib - Medicine Show No. 7: High Jazz- MLS
The always-busy Madlib presents another of his Medicine Show installments, on which he works out various jazzy themes with his jazz quintet; on this set, he experiments with more of a jazz-fusion selection, chopping up bits of psychedelic music, funk, soul, and worldbeats into his own blended array of sounds. “Electronic Dimensions” throws robotic bass and futuristic chords into a blender sassed by a hi-hat, while “Steppin’ Into Tomorrow” offers galloping spare guitars, and the humorously named “Funky Butt, Pt. 1” is definitely funky with its choppy rhythms, catchy-repetitive harmony bass, and background vocal throw-ins to cut up the mix even more.


Lloyd Miller - Lloyd Miller and Heliocentrics - Strut Records
The UK musical collective (Heliocentrics) pairs up with jazzy multi-instrumentalist Miller for this collection of songs, which blends New Orleans jazz and Middle Eastern flair together perfectly, bouncing the angles of the more American jazz harmonies off of the more freeform, pitchy tones of the Eastern instruments and Oriental soundscapes. “Electricone” focuses the album’s sound right from the beginning (it’s the opening track) with its massive range of notes and expansive feel, and “Spirit Jazz” veers around and around within its own arrangement, adding surprising elements on each layer; other standouts include “Nava” and “Sunda Sunset.”


Various Artists - Book a Trip: The Psych Pop Sounds of Capitol Records - Now Sounds
This album collects a variety of rare late ‘60s psychedelic singles from the Capitol Records roster, some included here in stereo for the first time. A full-page booklet guides you through each track’s liner notes, which include production by David Axelrod, arrangements by Leon Russell, and compositions by a host of famed songwriters. You’ll hear Capitol pop from the era by the likes of The Moonpark Intersection, the Teddy Neeley Five, The Staccatos, and This Side Up, among others; some of these kitschy retro tunes are even presented in (whoa!) new stereo.
 
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