Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Books · The Science of Santa
. . . .

The Science of Santa

Erin Crowell - December 13th, 2010
The Science of Santa : Flight of the Reindeer celebrates 15th anniversary edition
By Erin Crowell
Santa Claus is real.
We knew it when we were five and if we’re lucky, we know it now.
Being a young believer, I thought I had the answer around age five, playing in the snowy yard of my parent’s farmhouse—a few days past Christmas—when I looked up and saw a mark on the side of the chimney: a wet spot only a fat man could make brushing his snow-covered belly against the brick.
“It’s not from Santa,” my sister had said, rolling her eyes.
Despite her having three years of life experience on me, I remained confident that the Man in Red had lapsed in caution, leaving evidence of his existence (other than a trail of cookie crumbs).
It was a moment that brought the stars a little closer to earth and the magic surrounding Christmas shine a bit brighter -- and it has stuck with me to this day.
Maybe you have had one of these aha! moments...maybe you’re a doubter – a left-brained logical since birth. After all, how could one man circle the globe and deliver gifts to all the world’s children in one night?
With flying reindeer, of course.

DOCUMENTED MAGIC
15 years have passed since Robert Sullivan wrote “Flight of the Reindeer,” but the book that claims to give “The True Story of Santa Claus and His Christmas Mission” has re-emerged as a sound source to believers everywhere – in the form of a 15th anniversary edition.
“I have to say that before I got the call (from Sullivan) I did not know much about Santa and the team,” said Glenn Wolff, illustrator for “Flight of the Reindeer.” “Oh, I had heard the stories, seen the TV specials, and happily opened the presents, but like any young artist discovering the cold cruel world of survival in the ‘90s, I began to doubt my once solid beliefs.”
In 1995, while working in his Traverse City studio, Wolff got a phone call from Sullivan in New York City.
“He said he had written a story about Santa Claus, the truth about his Christmas Mission, and the secret of flying reindeer…and went on to say he thought I was just the artist to map the North Pole, Santa’s Christmas Eve flight routes and show how caribou antlers are aerodynamic.
Despite initial doubt, Wolff said he changed his mind quickly after a lunch meeting with Sullivan and his wife in New York’s Greenwich Village.
“He made a compelling case, laying out much of the ‘evidence’ and in no time I was convinced and signed on to the project,” said Wolff.

ABOUT THE BOOK
“Flight of the Reindeer” goes beyond a tale of what happens in one night – covering everything from man’s fascination with flying reindeer for the past 5,000 years to the geography of the North Pole to the land’s few visitors; and includes detailed accounts from historians, scientists and ‘helpers’ alike, including meteorologist Al Roker.
With a collaboration between Sullivan, Wolff and book designer J. Porter, the concept of “Flight of the Reindeer” materialized into a historical, scientific and logical look into who Santa is and how he does, well, what he does every year.
Not that he does it alone.
“Mrs. Claus is in charge of the factories, which are in operation twenty-four hours each day, 364 days a year. Einar Gustavsson, the Icelander who envisioned Santa’s flight from Greenland and is an expert on all aspects of elfin society, says this is in no way unusual for a community of elves.” –page 52
With an operation over 2,000 years old, the Christmas Mission has garnered support from ‘helpers’ all over the globe, including physicists, air traffic controllers and chimney sweeps.
Sweeper Lisa Patrick of the Hawaiian Islands is quoted in the book as saying, “It’s a dirty job, but somebody’s got to do it.”
Sullivan also goes beyond the logistics of Santa – exploring something much deeper.
“What I tried to convey in “Flight of the Reindeer” was not so much how they do what they do, but why,” he explained. “The science is fun, perhaps, but the moral of the story is what it’s all about for me. Why does this elfin community expend such effort for a charitable act of giving to all peoples? What is Santa trying to tell us about generosity and brotherhood? The more I learned about the Christmas Mission, the more I tuned my own moral compass.”
What about those flying reindeer?
Santa uses Peary caribou – the true fliers—even though many species of reindeer can fly. Well… sort of.
And the lighter weight of a Peary’s antlers allow for liftoff at slower speeds while its splayed hooves can excel it faster and at higher angles of attack.
Think passing commercial flights scare them on Christmas Eve? Not a chance when, every year, the President of the United States orders a moratorium on all flights close to the North Pole.
Seriously.
As for the old skeptic question, how can one man reach so many places in one night? All is explained, thanks to the careful pen, ink and watercolor maps created by Wolff who said he had plenty of sleigh flight data, diagram and maps to reference.

TIMELESS TALE
Still not a believer? Pick up a copy, maybe after gathering all the “evidence” will see you that anything is truly possible.
“Santa is a universal army of one out to simply do good and bring joy into the world,” said Wolff. “Who can argue with that? There are no party affiliations, scandals, corporate bail outs, or negative ad campaigns. Year after year, this guy just gets it done! To quote John Lennon, ‘Imagine...’”
“Flight of the Reindeer, 15th Anniversary Edition The True Story of Santa Claus and His Christmas Mission” by Robert Sullivan, drawings by Glenn Wolff is published by Skyhorse Publishing and retails for $22.95. Wolff will be singing copies of the book at McLean and Eakin Booksellers, in Petoskey, Dec. 16, from 5-7 p.m.; and at Horizon Books, Traverse City, Dec. 19, from 2-5 p.m. For more information on Wolff, visit glennwolff.com or see his fine art at 230 E. 14th Street, Traverse City, Studio D.The Science of Santa
Flight of the Reindeer celebrates 15th anniversary edition
By Erin Crowell

Santa Claus is real.
We knew it when we were five and if we’re lucky, we know it now.
Being a young believer, I thought I had the answer around age five, playing in the snowy yard of my parent’s farmhouse—a few days past Christmas—when I looked up and saw a mark on the side of the chimney: a wet spot only a fat man could make brushing his snow-covered belly against the brick.
“It’s not from Santa,” my sister had said, rolling her eyes.
Despite her having three years of life experience on me, I remained confident that the Man in Red had lapsed in caution, leaving evidence of his existence (other than a trail of cookie crumbs).
It was a moment that brought the stars a little closer to earth and the magic surrounding Christmas shine a bit brighter -- and it has stuck with me to this day.
Maybe you have had one of these aha! moments...maybe you’re a doubter – a left-brained logical since birth. After all, how could one man circle the globe and deliver gifts to all the world’s children in one night?
With flying reindeer, of course.

DOCUMENTED MAGIC
15 years have passed since Robert Sullivan wrote “Flight of the Reindeer,” but the book that claims to give “The True Story of Santa Claus and His Christmas Mission” has re-emerged as a sound source to believers everywhere – in the form of a 15th anniversary edition.
“I have to say that before I got the call (from Sullivan) I did not know much about Santa and the team,” said Glenn Wolff, illustrator for “Flight of the Reindeer.” “Oh, I had heard the stories, seen the TV specials, and happily opened the presents, but like any young artist discovering the cold cruel world of survival in the ‘90s, I began to doubt my once solid beliefs.”
In 1995, while working in his Traverse City studio, Wolff got a phone call from Sullivan in New York City.
“He said he had written a story about Santa Claus, the truth about his Christmas Mission, and the secret of flying reindeer…and went on to say he thought I was just the artist to map the North Pole, Santa’s Christmas Eve flight routes and show how caribou antlers are aerodynamic.
Despite initial doubt, Wolff said he changed his mind quickly after a lunch meeting with Sullivan and his wife in New York’s Greenwich Village.
“He made a compelling case, laying out much of the ‘evidence’ and in no time I was convinced and signed on to the project,” said Wolff.

ABOUT THE BOOK
“Flight of the Reindeer” goes beyond a tale of what happens in one night – covering everything from man’s fascination with flying reindeer for the past 5,000 years to the geography of the North Pole to the land’s few visitors; and includes detailed accounts from historians, scientists and ‘helpers’ alike, including meteorologist Al Roker.
With a collaboration between Sullivan, Wolff and book designer J. Porter, the concept of “Flight of the Reindeer” materialized into a historical, scientific and logical look into who Santa is and how he does, well, what he does every year.
Not that he does it alone.
“Mrs. Claus is in charge of the factories, which are in operation twenty-four hours each day, 364 days a year. Einar Gustavsson, the Icelander who envisioned Santa’s flight from Greenland and is an expert on all aspects of elfin society, says this is in no way unusual for a community of elves.” –page 52
With an operation over 2,000 years old, the Christmas Mission has garnered support from ‘helpers’ all over the globe, including physicists, air traffic controllers and chimney sweeps.
Sweeper Lisa Patrick of the Hawaiian Islands is quoted in the book as saying, “It’s a dirty job, but somebody’s got to do it.”
Sullivan also goes beyond the logistics of Santa – exploring something much deeper.
“What I tried to convey in “Flight of the Reindeer” was not so much how they do what they do, but why,” he explained. “The science is fun, perhaps, but the moral of the story is what it’s all about for me. Why does this elfin community expend such effort for a charitable act of giving to all peoples? What is Santa trying to tell us about generosity and brotherhood? The more I learned about the Christmas Mission, the more I tuned my own moral compass.”
What about those flying reindeer?
Santa uses Peary caribou – the true fliers—even though many species of reindeer can fly. Well… sort of.
And the lighter weight of a Peary’s antlers allow for liftoff at slower speeds while its splayed hooves can excel it faster and at higher angles of attack.
Think passing commercial flights scare them on Christmas Eve? Not a chance when, every year, the President of the United States orders a moratorium on all flights close to the North Pole.
Seriously.
As for the old skeptic question, how can one man reach so many places in one night? All is explained, thanks to the careful pen, ink and watercolor maps created by Wolff who said he had plenty of sleigh flight data, diagram and maps to reference.

TIMELESS TALE
Still not a believer? Pick up a copy, maybe after gathering all the “evidence” will see you that anything is truly possible.
“Santa is a universal army of one out to simply do good and bring joy into the world,” said Wolff. “Who can argue with that? There are no party affiliations, scandals, corporate bail outs, or negative ad campaigns. Year after year, this guy just gets it done! To quote John Lennon, ‘Imagine...’”
“Flight of the Reindeer, 15th Anniversary Edition The True Story of Santa Claus and His Christmas Mission” by Robert Sullivan, drawings by Glenn Wolff is published by Skyhorse Publishing and retails for $22.95. Wolff will be singing copies of the book at McLean and Eakin Booksellers, in Petoskey, Dec. 16, from 5-7 p.m.; and at Horizon Books, Traverse City, Dec. 19, from 2-5 p.m. For more information on Wolff, visit glennwolff.com or see his fine art at 230 E. 14th Street, Traverse City, Studio D.
 
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