Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Up in smoke
. . . .

Up in smoke

Anne Stanton - December 20th, 2010
Up in Smoke:  Legal battles create ongoing drama for medical
marijuana growers
By Anne Stanton
 Medical marijuana grower and patient Cecil Drost was able to drive off for
a Florida vacation last week instead of going to jail, relieved that
Charlevoix Prosecutor John Jarema decided to drop all charges against him.
But Drost anxiously wonders if he’ll be compensated for the estimated
$100,000 worth of medical marijuana plants that were seized in the raid.
Drost’s 32 plants were destroyed on September 20, after the Joint
Operational Law Enforcement (JOLT) multi-jurisdictional drug team flew
over Drost’s property in a black helicopter. Shortly afterward, five JOLT
officers entered Drost’s property next door to his home where he has a
barn, an RV, and an enclosed and locked steel mesh hoop house covered by a
white tarp and surrounded by a six-foot tall chain link fence. It was
here that Drost grew marijuana plants for himself and two other medical
marijuana patients.
The deputies edged around a locked power gate blocking his driveway and
went on Drost’s property without a search warrant at about 1:45 p.m. More
than two hours later, they persuaded Assistant Prosecutor Shaynee Fanara
to sign a search warrant by reporting to her that they had found marijuana
growing behind a tarp and “a fence with large open holes in it.”
Drost’s defense attorney, Jesse Williams, said the report of holes in the
fence was a “complete fabrication,” in documents filed with the court,
using photographs as proof. Deputies seized and destroyed all 32 plants.

More than a dozen people gathered in the courtroom to see the resulting
trial, but heard none of the deliberations that took place in the closed
chambers and at the podium of 90th District Court Judge Richard May.
At the last minute, the prosecutor asked for a promise from Drost to put
chicken wire over the roof of the hoop house. Williams said he readily
agreed because it meant that deputies would “never mess with Cecil again.
Putting that on the record is a safeguard for Cecil. Now he can have a
whole outdoor grow operation, unique to the whole state, and he won’t have
to continue putting plastic on top.”
Jarema said the reason for the chicken wire was that a kid could climb up
the six-foot fence, lean over and grab the plant that was sticking out of
the hoop house near the ground. “I just wanted to make sure people
couldn’t come in and grab his dope.”
Drost said after the trial that he didn’t believe the chicken wire would
make the hoop house any more secure. Someone would need a 14-foot arm with
multiple joints to reach over the six-foot chain link fence and through
another fence (with wider holes than a chicken fence) to the plants
inside, he said.
The Express ran an article about Drost’s troubles in its October 11 issue,
along with a videotaped interview on Up North TV 97. Following
publication, Jarema amped up the original misdemeanor charge to a
four-year felony of delivery and manufacture of a controlled substance,
according to court documents signed on October 19.
Jarema eventually reduced the felony charge to the original misdemeanor
violation of health department regulations after talking to Williams.

Williams asked the court to dismiss the misdemeanor charge, alleging that
the search warrant was obtained on false premises. Along with erroneously
asserting there were holes in the fence, Charlevoix Sheriff’s Deputy
William Church wrote that “the HEMP helicopter spotted marijuana growing”
on the defendant’s property. Williams argued that a “helicopter cannot
visually spot marijuana.”  He added that the law does not require that
medical marijuana plants be invisible from the air space, but only in a
locked and secure enclosure, according to documents filed with the court.
He also said that Drost presented medical marijuana cards for a legal
number of plants, which should have protected him from arrest or
prosecution, according to the law. The deputies failed to mention to
Fareena that Drost was a caregiver and had shown them the cards.
Jarema said in an interview that deputies did not need a search warrant
because they spotted marijuana from the helicopter, and had no way of
knowing that Drost was a legal caregiver until he presented his
state-approved cards once they were on the property. At that point, they
could see a marijuana plant sticking out between the six-foot fence and
hoop house.
        Both Jarema and Williams said after the trial that they felt the
resolution of the case was fair based on the facts.
Drost was grateful. “The Lord works in mysterious ways,” he said, just
before leaving the courthouse. “It’s been a bunch of crap for
everybody—family and friends.”

  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5